Drug Elimination in Public and Assisted Housing

Funding Availability for the Public and Indian Housing Drug Elimination Program (PHDEP)

Program Overview

    Purpose of the Program. To provide grants to eliminate drugs and
drug-related crime in public housing and Indian communities.

Available Funds. Approximately $242,750,000 is available during FY99 for PHDEP grants. Eligible Applicants. Public Housing Authorities (PHAs), Tribes, or Tribally Designated Housing Entities (TDHEs) on behalf of the Tribe. Application Deadline. June 16, 1999. Match. None. Additional Information If you are interested in applying for funding under this program, please review carefully the General Section of this SuperNOFA and the following information. I. Application Due Date, Application Kits, Further Information and Technical Assistance Application Due Date. Applications (an original and two copies) are due on or before 6:00 pm local time on June 16, 1999 at the address shown below. See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for specific procedures governing the form of application submission (e.g., mailed applications, express mail, overnight delivery, or hand carried). Address For Submitting Applications. Submit an original and two identical copies of the application by the application due date at the local Field Office with delegated public housing responsibilities: Attention: Director, Office of Public Housing, or, in the case of the Tribes or TDHEs, to the local HUD Administrator, Area Office of Native American Programs (AONAP), as appropriate. For Application Kits. To receive a copy of the Public Housing Drug Elimination Program (PHDEP) application kit please call the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD-8929. Persons with hearing or speech impairments may call the Center's TTY number at 1-800-483-2209. When requesting an application kit, please refer to the Public Housing Drug Elimination Program (PHDEP). Please provide your name, address (including zip code, and telephone number (including area code)). The application kit contains information on all exhibits, forms, and certifications required for PHDEP. For Further Information and Technical Assistance. Please call the local HUD Field Office HUB with delegated housing responsibilities for your housing agency, the Area Office of Native American Programs (AONAPs) with jurisdiction over your Tribe or Tribally Designated Housing Entity (TDHE) preparing your application, HUD's Drug Information and Strategy Clearinghouse (DISC) at 1-800-952-2232; or Sonia Burgos in the Community Safety and Conservation Division, Office of Public and Indian Housing, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Room 4206, Washington, DC 20410, telephone (202) 708-1197, extension 4227; or Tracy C. Outlaw, National Office of Native American Programs, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1999 Broadway, Suite 3390, Denver, CO 80202, telephone (303) 675-1600. (With the exception of the ``1-800'' telephone number, these are not toll-free numbers.) II. Amount Allocated Public Law 105-276 (the FY 1999 HUD Appropriations Act) appropriated $310,000,000 for the Public Housing Drug Elimination Program. Of the total $310,000,000 appropriated, approximately $242,750,000 is being made available for PHDEP grants. Additionally, $14,399 in FY 1999 funds is awarded to the Housing Authority of the City of Cedartown, GA, an FY 1997 PHDEP grantee mistakenly denied this amount for an eligible law enforcement activity. III. Program Description; Eligible Applicants; Eligible/Ineligible Activities (A) Program Description Funds are available for Public Housing Authorities (PHAs), Tribes or Tribally Designated Housing Entities (TDHEs) to develop and finance drug and drug-related crime elimination efforts in their developments. You may use funds for enhancing security within your developments, making physical improvements to enhance security; and/or developing and implementing prevention, intervention and treatment programs to stop drug use in public and Indian housing communities. In FY 1999, HUD is requiring all applicants to establish measurable baseline information and realistic goals for drug-related crime in Public Housing and for all major PHDEP activities being proposed. This information will be reported in a new PHDEP Semi-Annual Reporting System which will be implemented by July 1999. In addition, HUD is developing a formula based system for use in awarding PHDEP grants. (B) Eligible Applicants Eligible applicants include PHAs, Tribes or TDHEs. (A Tribe can apply either in its own name or through its TDHE. A TDHE cannot apply on behalf of a Tribe that is applying on its own behalf.) Resident Management Corporations (RMCs); and incorporated Resident Councils (RCs) are eligible for funding from PHAs as sub-grantees. RMCs and ROs that were operating pursuant to 24 CFR part 950 are eligible for funding from Tribes or TDHEs as subgrantees to develop security and substance abuse prevention programs. (C) Eligible/Ineligible Activities Under statute, PHDEP grants may be used for seven types of activities including: Physical improvement specifically designed to enhance security; Programs designed to reduce use of drugs in and around public or Indian housing developments including drug-abuse prevention, intervention, referral, and treatment; Funding for non- profit public housing resident management corporations (RMCs), Resident Councils (RCs), and Resident Organizations (ROs) to develop security and drug abuse prevention programs involving site residents; Employment of security personnel; Employment of personnel to investigate and provide evidence in administrative or judicial proceeding; Reimbursement of local law enforcement agencies for additional security and protective services; and Training, communications equipment, and related equipment for use by voluntary tenant patrols. Following is a discussion by activity type of: what is fundable; what is not fundable; and specific requirements or items that need to be discussed in your application if you are including that activity in your application. (1) Physical Improvements to Enhance Security. (a) Physical improvements specifically designed to enhance security may include: installing barriers, speed bumps, lighting systems, fences, surveillance equipment (e.g., Closed Circuit Television (CCTV), computers and software, fax machines, cameras, monitors, and supporting equipment), bolts, locks, and landscaping or reconfiguring common areas to discourage drug-related crime. (i) All physical improvements must be accessible to persons with disabilities. For example, locks or buzzer systems that are not accessible to persons with restricted or impaired strength, mobility, or hearing may not be funded by PHDEP. Defensible space improvements must comply with civil rights requirements and cannot exclude [[Page 9746]] or segregate people because of their race, color, or national origin from benefits, services, or other terms or conditions of housing. All physical improvements must meet the accessibility requirements of 24 CFR part 8. (ii) Funding is permitted for the purchase or lease of house trailers of any type that are not designated as a building if they are used for eligible community policing, educational, employment, and youth activities. A justification of purchase versus lease must be supported by your cost-benefit analysis. (b) Ineligible Improvements. (i) Physical improvements that involve demolishing any units in a development. (ii) Physical improvements that would displace persons are ineligible. (iii) Acquiring real property. (2) Programs to Reduce Drug Use (Prevention, Intervention, Treatment, Structured Aftercare and Support Systems). (a) General Requirements and Strategies. HUD is looking for you to structure your substance abuse prevention, intervention, treatment, and aftercare program using a ``continuum of care'' approach. A ``continuum of care'' approach includes not just treating the addiction or dependency but providing aftercare, mentoring, and support services such as day care, family counseling, education, training, employment development opportunities, and other activities. You must develop a substance abuse/sobriety (remission)/treatment (dependency) strategy to adequately plan your substance abuse prevention, intervention, treatment, and structured aftercare efforts. In many cases, you may want to include education, training, and employment opportunities for residents; and support Welfare to Work initiatives. When undertaking these activities, you should be leveraging your PHDEP resources with other Federal, State, local and Tribal resources. For example, your application may propose providing space and other infrastructure for these efforts with several public agencies providing staff and other resources at limited or no cost. Your application should also discuss how your strategy incorporates existing community resources and how they will be used in your program. The strategy should also document how community resources will be provided on-site, or how participants will be referred and transported to treatment programs that are not on-site. A community-based approach also requires you to develop a culturally appropriate strategy. Curricula, activities, and staff should address the cultural issues of the local community, which requires your application to indicate your familiarity and facility with the language and cultural norms of the community. As applicable, your strategy should discuss cultural competencies associated with Hispanic, African-American, Asian, Native American or other racial or ethnic communities. Your activities should focus resources directly to housing authority residents and families. For all activities involving education, training and employment, you should demonstrate efforts to coordinate with Federal, Tribal, State and local employment training and development services, ``welfare to work'' efforts, or other new ``welfare reform'' efforts. The current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of Mental Disorders of the American Psychiatric Association dated May 1994, contains information on substance abuse, dependency and structured aftercare. For more information about this reference, contact: APPI, 1400 K. Street, NW, Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20005 on 1(800) 368-5777 or World Wide Web site at http://www.appi.org. Eligible activities may include: (i) Substance abuse prevention, intervention, and referral programs; (ii) Programs of local social, faith-based and/or other organizations that provide treatment services (contractual or otherwise) for dependency/remission; and (iii) Structured aftercare/support system programs. (b) Activities must be ``in and around''. PHDEP funding is permitted for programs that reduce/eliminate drug-related crime ``in and around'' the premises of the housing authority/development(s). HUD has defined the term ``in and around'' to mean within, or adjacent to, the physical boundaries of a public or Indian housing development. This ensures that program funds and activities are targeted to benefit, as directly as possible, public and Indian housing developments and their residents. (c) Eligible cost. (i) Funding is permitted for reasonable, necessary, and justified purchasing or leasing (whichever is documented as the most cost effective) of vehicles for transporting adult and youth residents for education, job training, and off-site treatment programs directly related to reducing drugs and drug-related crime. The cost reasonableness can be determined by a comparison of the number of participants in and anticipated costs of these programs compared to the purchase or lease cost of the vehicles. If these costs are included in your application, you must include a description of why the expenses are necessary. Under no circumstances are these vehicles to be used for other than their intended purpose under your grant. (ii) Funding is permitted for reasonable, necessary and justified program costs, such as meals and beverages incurred only for training, education and employment activities, and youth services directly related to reducing drugs and drug-related crime. Refer to Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-87, Cost Principles for State, Local and Indian Tribal Governments. (d) Prevention. Prevention programs must demonstrate that they will provide directly, or otherwise make available, services designed to distribute substance/drug education information, to foster effective parenting skills, and to provide referrals for treatment and other available support services in the housing development or the community for housing authority families. Prevention programs should provide a comprehensive prevention approach for residents that address the individual resident and his or her relationship to family, peers, and the community. Your prevention programs activities should identify and change the causal factors present in housing authorities that lead to drug-related crime thereby lowering the risk of drug usage. Many components of a comprehensive approach, including refusal and restraint skills training programs or drug, substance abuse/dependency and family counseling, may already be available in the community of your housing developments and should be included to the maximum extent possible in your proposed program of activities. The following eligible activities under a prevention program are discussed in more detail below: educational opportunities; family and other support services; youth services; and economic and educational opportunities for resident adult and youth activities. (i) Educational Opportunities. The causes and effects of illegal drug/substance abuse must be discussed in a culturally appropriate and structured setting. You may contract (in accordance with 24 CFR 85.36) to provide such knowledge and skills through training programs. The professionals contracted to provide these services are required to base their services on your needs assessment and program plan. These educational opportunities may be a part of resident [[Page 9747]] meetings, youth activities, or other gatherings of public and Indian housing residents. (ii) Family and Other Support Services. ``Supportive services'' are services that allow housing authority families to have access to prevention, educational and employment opportunities. Supportive services may include: child care; employment training; computer skills training; remedial education; substance abuse counseling; help in getting a high school equivalency certificate; and other services to reduce drug-related crime. (iii) Youth Services. ``Educating and enabling America's youth to reject illegal drugs'' is Goal #1 of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) top five goals in the Nation's Drug Control Strategy. Activities that target youth further this goal. Proposed youth prevention programs must demonstrate that they have included groups composed of young people ages 16 through 18. Your youth prevention activities should be coordinated by adults but have housing authority youth actively involved in organizing youth leadership, sports, recreational, cultural and other activities. Eligible youth services may include: youth sports; youth leadership skills training; cultural and recreational activities. These youth services provide an alternative to drugs and drug-related criminal activity for public housing and Native American youth. Youth leadership skills training may include training in leadership, peer pressure reversal, resistance or refusal skills, life skills, goal planning, parenting skills, and other relevant topics. Youth leadership training should be designed to place youth in leadership roles including: mentors to younger program participants, assistant coaches, managers, and team captains. Cultural and recreational activities may include ethnic heritage classes, art, dance, drama and music appreciation. The following are eligible youth services activities: (1) Salaries and expenses for staff for youth sports programs and cultural activities and leadership training; (2) Sports and recreation equipment to be used by participants; (3) Non-profit subgrantees that provide scheduled organized sports competitions, cultural, educational, recreational or other activities, including: Boys and Girls Clubs, YMCAs, YWCAs, the Inner City Games, Association of Midnight Basketball Leagues. (4) Liability insurance costs for youth sports activities. (iv) Economic and Educational Opportunities for Resident Adult and Youth. Your proposed economic and educational activities must provide residents opportunities for interaction with, or referral to, established higher education, vocational institutions and/or private sector businesses in the immediate surrounding communities with the goal of developing or building on the residents' skills to pursue educational, vocational and economic goals and become self-sufficient. You should discuss your economic and educational opportunities for residents and youth activities in the context of ``welfare to work'' and related Federal, Tribal, State and local government efforts for employment training, education and employment opportunities related to ``welfare to work'' goals. Establishing or referring adults and youth to computer learning centers, employment service centers (coordinated with Federal, Tribal, State and local employment offices), and micro- business centers are eligible. Limited educational scholarships are permitted under this section. No one individual award may exceed $500.00, and there is a total maximum scholarship program cap of $10,000. Educational scholarship FY 1999 PHDEP funds must be obligated and expended during the term of your grant. You must demonstrate in your plan and timetable the scholarship strategy; the financial and management controls that will be used; and projected outcomes. (e) Intervention. The aim of intervention is to identify or detect residents with substance abuse issues, assist them in modifying their behavior, and in getting early treatment, and structured aftercare. (f) Substance Abuse/Dependency Treatment. (i) Treatment funded under this program should be ``in and around'' the premises of the housing authority/development(s) you proposed for funding. In undertaking substance abuse/dependency treatment programs, you must establish a confidentiality policy regarding medical and disability related information. (ii) Funds awarded for substance abuse/dependency treatment must be targeted towards developing and implementing, or expanding and improving sobriety maintenance, substance-free maintenance support groups, substance abuse counseling, referral treatment services, and short or long range structured aftercare for residents. (iii) Your proposed drug program must address the following goals for residents: (1) Increasing accessibility of treatment services; (2) Decreasing drug-related crime ``in and around'' your housing authority/development(s) by reducing and/or eliminating drug use; and (3) Providing services designed for youth and/or adult drug abusers and recovering addicts (e.g., prenatal and postpartum care, specialized family and parental counseling, parenting classes, domestic or youth violence counseling). (iv) Approaches that have proven effective with similar populations will be considered for funding. You must discuss in your overall strategy the following factors: (1) Formal referral arrangements to other treatment programs in cases where the resident is able to obtain treatment costs from sources other than this program. (2) Family/youth counseling. (3) Linkages to educational and vocational training and employment counseling. (4) Coordination of services from and to appropriate local substance abuse/treatment agencies, HIV-related service agencies, mental health and public health programs. (v) As applicable, you must demonstrate a working partnership with the Single State Agency or local, Tribal or State license provider or authority with substance abuse program(s) coordination responsibilities to coordinate, develop and implement your substance dependency treatment proposal. (vi) You must demonstrate that counselors (contractual or otherwise) meet Federal, State, Tribal, and local government licensing, bonding, training, certification and continuing training re- certification requirements. (vii) You must get certification from the Single State Agency or authority with substance abuse and dependency programs coordination responsibilities that your proposed program is consistent with the State plan; and that the service(s) meets all Federal, State, Tribal and local government medical licensing, training, bonding, and certification requirements. (viii) Funding is permitted for drug treatment of housing authority residents at local in-patient medical treatment programs and facilities. PHDEP funding for structured in-patient drug treatment under PHDEP funds is limited to 60 days, and structured drug out- patient treatment, which includes individual/family aftercare, is limited to 6 months. If you are undertaking drug treatment programs, your proposal must demonstrate how individuals that complete drug treatment will be provided employment training, education and employment [[Page 9748]] opportunities related to ``welfare to work.'' (ix) Funding is permitted for detoxification procedures designed to reduce or eliminate the short-term presence of toxic substances in the body tissues of a patient. (x) Funding is not permitted for maintenance drug programs. Maintenance drugs are medications that are prescribed regularly for a short/long period of supportive therapy (e.g. methadone maintenance), rather than for immediate control of a disorder. (3) Resident Management Corporations (RMCs), Resident Councils (RCs), and Resident Organizations (ROs). RMCs, and incorporated RCs and ROs, may be a subcontractor to their housing authorities, or Tribe/ TDHE, to develop security and substance abuse prevention programs for residents. Such programs may include voluntary tenant patrol activities, substance abuse education, intervention, and referral programs, youth programs, and outreach efforts. The elimination of drug-related crime within housing authorities/developments must have the active involvement and commitment of public and Indian housing residents and their organizations. Active involvement requires that residents be involved in the planning process and implementation. To enhance the ability of housing authorities, and Tribes/TDHEs, to combat drug-related crime within their developments, Resident Councils (RCs), Resident Management Corporations (RMCs), and Resident Organizations (ROs) may undertake program management functions, notwithstanding the otherwise applicable requirements of 24 CFR part 964. Subcontracts with the RMC/RC/RO must include the amount of funding, applicable terms, conditions, financial controls, payment mechanism schedule, performance and financial report requirements, special conditions, including sanctions for violating the agreement, and monitoring requirements. Costs must not be incurred until a written contract is executed. (4) Employment of HA Security Personnel. You may employ HA security personnel. Employment of security personnel is divided into two categories: security personnel services, and housing authority police departments. You are encouraged to involve police officials residing in public housing to partake in PHDEP security-related programs. The following specific requirements apply to all employment of security personnel activities funded under PHDEP: (a) Compliance. Security guard personnel and public housing authority police departments must meet; and demonstrate compliance with, all relevant Federal, State, Tribal or local government insurance, licensing, certification, training, bonding, or other law enforcement requirements. (b) Law Enforcement Service Agreement. You must enter into a law enforcement service agreement with the local law enforcement agency and if applicable, the contract provider of security. Your service agreement must include: (i) The activities security guard personnel or the public housing authority police department (HAPD) will perform; the scope of authority; written policies, procedures, and practices that will govern security personnel or HAPD performance (i.e., a policy manual and how security guard personnel or the HAPD shall coordinate activities with your local law enforcement agency); (ii) The types of activities that your approved security guard personnel or the HAPD are expressly prohibited from undertaking. (c) Policy Manual. Security guard personnel services and PHPDs must be guided by a policy manual that directs the activities of its personnel and contains the policies, procedures, and general orders that regulate conduct and describes in detail how jobs are to be performed. The policy manual must exist before HUD will execute your grant agreement. To comply with State police department standards and/ or Commission on Accreditation Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA), you must also ensure all security guard personnel and housing authority police officers are trained in the following areas. These areas must also be covered in your policy manual: (i) Use of force; (ii) Resident contacts; (iii) Enforcement of HA rules; (iv) Response criteria to calls; (v) Pursuits; (vi) Arrest procedures; (vii) Reporting of crimes and workload; (viii) Feedback procedures to victims; (ix) Citizens' complaint procedures; (x) Internal affairs investigations; (xi) Towing of vehicles; (xii) Authorized weapons and other equipment; (xiii) Radio procedures internally and with local police; (xiv) Training requirements; (xv) Patrol procedures; (xvi) Scheduling of meetings with residents; (xvii) Reports to be completed; (xviii) Record keeping and position descriptions on all personnel; (xix) Post assignments; (xx) Monitoring; (xxi) Self-evaluation program requirements; and (xxii) First aid training. (d) Data Management. A daily activity and incident complaint form approved by the housing authority must be used by security personnel and officers for the collection and analysis of criminal incidents and responses to service calls. Security guard personnel and HAPDs must establish and maintain a system of records management for the daily activity and incident complaint forms that appropriately ensures the confidentially of personal criminal information. Management Informational Systems (MIS) (computers, software, and associated equipment) and management personnel. Costs in support of these activities are eligible for funding. (5) Security Personnel Services. Contracting for, or direct housing authority employment of, security personnel services in and around housing development(s) is permitted under this program. However, contracts for security personnel services must be awarded on a competitive basis. (a) Eligible Services--Over and Above. Security guard personnel funded by this program must perform services that are over and above those usually performed by local municipal law enforcement agencies on a routine basis. Eligible services may include patrolling inside buildings, providing personnel services at building entrances to check for proper identification, or patrolling and checking car parking lots for appropriate parking decals. (b) Employment of Residents. HUD encourages you to employ qualified resident(s) as security guard personnel, and/or to contract with security guard personnel firms that demonstrate a program to employ qualified residents as security guard personnel. Since your program of eliminating drug-related crime should promote ``welfare to work'' an excellent way to implement this is to employ residents. (6) Employment of Personnel and Equipment for HUD Authorized Housing Authority Police Departments. Funding equipment and employment of housing authority police department (HAPD) personnel is permitted for housing authorities that already have HAPDs. The following 12 housing authorities are approved by HUD as being eligible under the FY 1999 PHDEP for these activities: Baltimore Housing Authority and Community Development, Baltimore, MD Boston Housing Authority, Boston, MA Buffalo Housing Authority, Buffalo, NY [[Page 9749]] Chicago Housing Authority, Chicago, IL Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority, Cleveland, OH Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA Housing Authority of the City of Oakland, Oakland, CA Philadelphia Housing Authority, Philadelphia, PA Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA Waterbury Housing Authority, Waterbury, CT Virgin Islands Housing Authority, Virgin Islands District of Columbia Housing Authority, Washington, DC (a) Notice PIH 98-16, issued March 11, 1998, reinstated PIH 95-58 (PHA) ``Guidelines for Creating, Implementing and Managing Public Housing Authority Police Departments in Public Housing Authorities).'' This Notice identifies prerequisites for creating HAPDs and provides guidance to assist housing authorities in making decisions about public housing security, analysis of security needs, and performance measures and outcomes. (b) Housing authorities with their own HAPDs, but that are not included in the list above, shall request (in writing) to be recognized by HUD as a HAPD. The written request must be sent to the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Public and Assisted Housing Delivery, Public and Indian Housing, Department of Housing and Urban Development, Room 4204, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Washington, D.C. 20410. This request must be approved by HUD before you submit your FY 1999 PHDEP application. (c)(i) HAPDs funded under this program that are not nationally or state accredited must submit a plan and timetable for such accreditation. Housing authorities may use either their State accreditation program, if one exists, or the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) for this purpose. Use of grant funds for HAPD accreditation activities is permitted. (ii) Housing authorities receiving grants for funding HAPDs are required to hire an HAPD accreditation specialist to manage the accreditation program. HAPDs must submit a plan and timetable to be funded for this activity. If you have a public housing police department funded under the FY 1996, 1997, or 1998 PHDEP you must demonstrate in your plan what progress you made in implementing your accreditation program and the projected date of accreditation. HUD will monitor results of your plan and timetable. HAPDs not meeting their timetables will be ineligible for funding in FY 2000. (d) If you are an applicant seeking funding for this activity, you must describe the current level of local law enforcement agency baseline services being provided to the housing authority/ development(s) proposed for assistance. Local law enforcement baseline services are defined as ordinary and routine services provided to the residents as part of the overall city and/or county-wide deployment of police resources to respond to crime and other public safety incidents including: 911 communications, processing calls for service, routine patrol officer responses to calls for service, and investigative follow-up of criminal activity. (e) If you are requesting funding for housing authority public housing authority police department officers, you must have car-to-car (or other vehicles) and portable-to-portable radio communications links between public housing authority police officers and local law enforcement officers to assure a coordinated and safe response to crimes or calls for services. The use of scanners (radio monitors) is not sufficient to meet the requirements of this section. If you do not have such links you must submit a plan and timetable for the implementation of such communications links. This activity is eligible for funding. If you were a housing authority funded under the FY 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, and/or 1998 PHDEP for public housing police departments, you must demonstrate what progress has been made in implementing its planned communications links. (f) HAPDs funded under this program that are not employing a community policing concept must submit a plan and timetable for the implementation of community policing with their application for funding. If you were a housing authority funded under the FY 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, or 1998 PHDEP for HAPDs shall demonstrate what progress they have made in implementing a community policing program. (g) Community policing under PHDEP is defined as a method of providing law enforcement services partnership among residents, police, schools, churches, government services, the private sector, and other local, State, Tribal, and Federal law enforcement agencies to prevent crime and improve the quality of life by addressing the conditions and problems that lead to crime and fear of crime. Community policing uses proactive measures including foot patrols, bicycle patrols, and motor scooters patrols. It also includes KOBAN activities where police officers operate out of police mini-stations, and other community-based facilities in housing authorities providing human resource activities with youth), and citizen contacts. This concept empowers police officers at the beat and zone level and residents in neighborhoods to: (i) Reduce crime and fear of crime; (ii) Ensure the maintenance of order; (iii) Provide referrals of residents, victims, and homeless persons to social services and government agencies; (iv) Ensure feedback of police actions to victims of crime; and (v) Promote a law enforcement value system based on the needs and rights of residents. For additional information regarding KOBAN community policing contact Cedric Brown, (202) 708-1197, extension 4057. (h) Authorized PHPDs can purchase or lease law enforcement clothing or equipment. Eligible law enforcement clothing or equipment may include uniforms and protective vests; firearms/weapons and ammunition; police vehicles including cars, vans, buses; or other equipment supporting PHPDs crime prevention and security mission. If you have not been identified by HUD as having an authorized PHPD, you are not permitted to use PHDEP funds to purchase any clothing or equipment for use by local municipal police departments and/or other law enforcement agencies. (7) Reimbursement of Local Law Enforcement Agencies for Additional (Supplemental--Over and Above Local Law Enforcement Baseline Services) Security and Protective Services. Additional security and protective services are permitted if services are over and above the local police department's current level of baseline services. Housing authorities, Tribes, and TDHEs are required to identify the level of local law enforcement services received and the increased level of services to be received in their local Cooperation Agreement. (8) Employment of Investigators. Employment of, and equipment for, one or more individuals to investigate drug-related crime ``in and around'' the real property comprising your development(s) and providing evidence relating to such crime in any administrative or judicial proceedings is permitted. Under this section, reimbursable costs associated with the investigation of drug-related crimes (e.g., travel directly related to the investigator's activities, or costs associated with the investigator's testimony at judicial or administrative proceedings) may only be those directly incurred by the investigator. [[Page 9750]] (a) If you are a housing authority that employs investigators funded by this program, you must demonstrate compliance with all relevant Federal, Tribal, State or local government insurance, licensing, certification, training, bonding, or other similar law enforcement requirements. (b) Both you and the provider of the investigative services are required to execute a written agreement that describes the following: (i) The activities that your investigators will perform, their scope of authority, reports to be completed, established investigative policies, procedures, and practices that will govern their performance (i.e., a Policy Manual; and how your investigators will coordinate their activities with local, State, Tribal, and Federal law enforcement agencies); and prohibited activities. (ii) The activities the housing authority/Tribal investigators are expressly prohibited from undertaking. (c) Your investigator(s) may use PHDEP funds to purchase or lease any law enforcement clothing or equipment, such as vehicles, uniforms, ammunition, firearms/weapons, or vehicles; including cars, vans, buses, protective vests, and any other supportive equipment. (d) Your investigator(s) shall report on drug-related crime in your developments. You must establish, implement and maintain a system of records management that ensures confidentiality of criminal records and information. Housing authority-approved activity forms must be used for collection, analysis and reporting of activities by your investigators. You are encouraged to develop and use Management Information Systems (MIS) (Computers, software, hardware, and associated equipment) and hire management personnel for crime and workload reporting in support of your crime prevention and security activities. (e) You may not expend funds and funds will not be released by the local HUD Field Office/AONAP until you have met the requirements of (6)(i)(d). (9) Voluntary Tenant Patrols. HUD believes the elimination of drug- related crime within and around the housing authority/development(s) requires the active involvement and commitment of residents and their organizations. Members of tenant patrols must be volunteers and must be residents of the housing authority's development(s). Voluntary tenant patrols are expected to patrol in your development(s) proposed for assistance, and to report illegal activities to appropriate housing authority staff, and local, State, Tribal, and Federal law enforcement agencies, as appropriate. (a) Training equipment, uniforms) for use by voluntary tenant patrols acting in cooperation with officials of local law enforcement agencies is permitted. All costs must be reasonable, necessary and justified. Bicycles, motor scooters, all season uniforms and associated equipment to be used, exclusively, by the members of your voluntary tenant patrol are eligible items. Voluntary tenant patrol uniforms and equipment must be identified with your specific housing authority/ development(s) identification and markings. (b) Housing authorities are required to obtain liability insurance to protect themselves and the members of the voluntary tenant patrol against potential liability for the activities of the patrol under this program. The cost of this insurance is eligible. (c) If you are funding voluntary tenant patrol activities, you, your local law enforcement agency, and the tenant patrol, before expending grant funds, are required to execute a written agreement that includes: (i) The nature of the activities to be performed by your voluntary tenant patrol, the patrol's scope of authority, assignment, policies, procedures, and practices that will govern the voluntary tenant patrol's performance and how the patrol will coordinate its activities with the law enforcement agency; (ii) The activities the voluntary tenant patrol is expressly prohibited from undertaking and that the carrying or use of firearms,weapons, nightsticks, clubs, handcuffs, or mace is prohibited; (iii) Required initial and on-going voluntary tenant patrol training members will receive from the local law enforcement agency; (Please note that training by HUD-approved trainers and/or the local law enforcement agency is required before putting a voluntary tenant patrol into effect); and (iv) Voluntary tenant patrol members will be subject to individual or collective liability for any actions undertaken outside the scope of their authority (described in paragraph (ii) above) and that such acts are not covered under your housing authority liability insurance. (d) PHDEP grant funds must not be used for any type of financial compensation, such as full-time wages or salaries for voluntary tenant and/or patrol participants. Funding for housing authority personnel or resident(s) to be hired to coordinate this activity is permitted. Excessive staffing is not submitted. (10) Evaluation of PHDEP Activities. Funding is permitted to contractually hire organizations and/or consultant(s) to conduct an independent assessment and evaluation of the effectiveness of your PHDEP program. You should include in your plan and budget contracting with an independent survey organization to conduct an annual resident survey in your targeted developments/areas. The amount of funding proposed for conducting assessments or evaluations should be necessary, reasonable, and justified. However, even except if adequately justified, HUD would not expect that this cost should exceed ten (10) percent of the total grant amount requested. (11) High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTAs). Funding may be used for activities to eliminate drug-related crime in housing owned by a public housing agency that is not public housing assisted under the United States Housing Act of 1937 and is not otherwise federally assisted. For example, housing that receives tenant subsidies under Section 8 is federally assisted and would not qualify, but housing that receives only State, Tribal, or local assistance would qualify if it meets the following two requirements: (a) The housing is located in a high intensity drug trafficking area designated pursuant to Section 1005 of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 (see Appendix A); and (b) The PHA owning the housing demonstrates, on the basis of information submitted, that the drug-related crime at the housing authority project has a detrimental affect in or around the housing. The High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTAs) are areas identified as having problems that adversely impact the rest of the country. (D) Ineligible Activities. PHDEP funding is not permitted for any of the activities listed below, unless otherwise specified in this PHDEP section of the SuperNOFA. (1) Costs incurred before the effective date of your grant agreement (Form HUD-1044), including, but not limited to, consultant fees related to the development of your application or the actual writing of your application. (2) The purchase of controlled substances for any purpose. Controlled substance shall have the meaning provided in section 102 of the Controlled Substance Act (21 U.S.C. 802). (3) Compensation of informants, including confidential informants. These should be part of the baseline services provided and budgeted by local law enforcement agencies. [[Page 9751]] (4) Direct purchase or lease of clothing or equipment, vehicles (including cars, vans, and buses), uniforms, ammunition, firearms/ weapons, protective vests, and any other supportive equipment for use in law enforcement or military enforcement except for HAPDs and investigator activities listed in this program section of the SuperNOFA. (5) Construction of facility space in a building or unit, and the costs of retrofitting/modifying existing buildings owned by the housing authorities and TDHEs for purposes other than: community policing mini- station operations, adult/youth education, employment training facilities, and drug abuse treatment activities. (6) Organized fund raising, advertising, financial campaigns, endowment drives, solicitation of gifts and bequests, rallies, marches, community celebrations, stipends and similar expenses. (7) Court costs and attorneys fees related to screening or evicting residents for drug-related crime are not allowable. (8) PHDEP grant funds cannot be transferred to any Federal agency. (9) Costs to establish councils, resident associations, resident organizations, and resident corporations are not allowable. (10) Indirect costs are not allowable. (11) Supplant existing positions/activities. For purposes of the PHDEP, supplanting is defined as ``taking the place of or to supersede''. (12) Alcohol-exclusive activities and programs are not eligible for funding under this program section of the SuperNOFA, although activities and programs may address situations of multiple abuse involving controlled substances and alcohol. This is because under law, PHDEP is limited to only controlled substances. IV. Program Requirements Your application must meet all the applicable threshold requirements described in Section II.B. of the General Section of this SuperNOFA. In addition to the program requirements listed in the General Section of this SuperNOFA, the following are requirements specific to PHDEP: (A) Maximum Grant Award Amounts HUD is distributing grant funds for PHDEP under this SuperNOFA on a national competition basis. Maximum grant award amounts are computed for PHDEP on a sliding scale, using an overall maximum cap, depending upon the number of housing authority, tribe or TDHE units eligible for funding. (1) PHAs. (a) The unit count includes rental, Turnkey III Homeownership, and Section 23 leased housing bond-financed projects. Eligible units are those that are under management and fully developed, and must be covered by an ACC during the period of grant award. In determining unit count for PHA-Owned Rental Housing, a long-term vacancy unit as defined in 24 CFR 990.102 is included in the count. (b) PHAs preparing PHDEP applications are required to confirm/ validate the unit count with the local Field Office (Office of Public Housing) before you submit your application. Field Offices shall not include non-Federally Assisted Housing located in High Intensity Drug- Trafficking Areas in the unit count. Confirmation/Validation may be given if the unit count to be used for a particular program (e.g., PHA- Owned Rental) is the same as the unit count reflected on a PHA's most recently approved Operating Budget (Form HUD-52564) and/or subsidy calculation (Form HUD-52723) submitted for that program. Field Offices that have PHAs that are not required to submit either of these forms may confirm/validate the PHDEP unit count if it is the same as the most recently submitted Form HUD-51234. Field Offices in validating the unit count shall not include Non-Federally Assisted Housing units located in High Intensity Drug-Trafficking Areas. (2) Tribes and TDHEs. (a) The unit count includes rental, Turnkey III and Mutual Help Homeownership units which have not been conveyed to a homebuyer, and Section 23 lease housing bond-financed projects. Such units must be counted as Current Assisted Stock under the Indian Housing Block Grant Program. (b) Eligible units are those units which are under management and fully developed. However, you should note that in determining the unit count for PHA-owned or Native American rental housing, a long-term vacancy unit, as defined in 990.102 or 24 CFR 950.102 (as revised May 1, 1996), is still included in the count. If you are an applicant for Native American housing developments, you must certify that the targeted units were covered by an Annual Contributions Contract (ACC) on September 30, 1997. (c) Use the number of units counted as Formula Current Assisted Stock for Fiscal Year 1999 as defined in 24 CFR 1000.316. (3) FY 1999 grant award amounts. (i) If you are a PHA, Tribe, or TDHE with 1-1,250 units: The maximum grant award cap is $300.00 multiplied by the number of eligible units. (ii) If you are a PHA, Tribe, or TDHE with 1,251-24,999 units: The maximum grant award is $260.00 multiplied by the number of eligible units. (iii) If you are a PHA, Tribe, or TDHE with 25,000-49,999 units: The maximum grant award is $230.00 multiplied by the number of eligible units. (iv) If you are a PHA, Tribe, or TDHE with 50,000 or more units: The grant award is $200.00 multiplied by the number of eligible units; up to, but not to exceed, a maximum grant award of $35 million. You can not apply for more funding than is permitted in accordance with the maximum grant award amounts described above. If you request funding that exceeds the maximum grant award amount permitted your application will be rejected and you will not be eligible for any funding, unless a computational error was involved in the funding request. (B) Complying With Civil Rights Requirements To protect and insure the civil rights of occupants of HUD- sponsored housing and residents around that housing, your proposed strategies should ensure that you do not undertake crime-fighting and drug prevention activities that violate civil rights and fair housing statutes. You may not use race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability or familial status to profile persons as suspects or otherwise target them in conducting these activities. You are encouraged to involve as many segments of your intended population as possible in developing and implementing your strategies. (C) Section 3 Economic Opportunity Please see Section II of the General Section of this SuperNOFA. Section 3 may be applicable to some of your activities funded by this PHDEP NOFA. (D) Confidentiality of Records Requirements You must establish a confidentiality policy regarding medical and disability-related information for programs involving prevention, intervention, or substance abuse/dependency treatment and aftercare. (E) Commingling of Funds Housing authorities must not co-mingle funds of multiple HUD programs including: CIAP; CGP; OTAR; EDSS; TOP; IHBG; HOPE projects; Family Investment; Elderly Service Coordinator; and Operating Subsidy. [[Page 9752]] (F) Term of Grant Your grant funds must be expended within 24 months after HUD executes a Grant Agreement. There will be no extensions of this grant term and at the end of the grant term all unspent funds will be returned to HUD. (G) Reports and Closeout (1) In accordance with 24 CFR 761.35, if funded, you are required to submit semiannually a PHDEP Semi-Annual Performance Report and the Semi-Annual Financial Status Report (SF-269A) to the appropriate HUD Field Office. (2) In the past, the PHDEP Semi-Annual Performance report was often referred to as the ``narrative'' report. For FY 1999 PHDEP grants, HUD will be requiring more specific data to facilitate providing more meaningful performance information to comply with the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA), and to provide greater assurance that the program activities undertaken are effective in reducing drugs and drug-related or violent crime in areas targeted by PHDEP funds. These reports will evaluate your overall performance under the grant, against the baselines and goals and objectives contained in your approved FY 99 application. (3) For FY 1999 grants, HUD will require selected applicants to report semiannually on their progress in reducing drugs and drug- related crime using the objective Part I and Part II crime data as a baseline and the specific percentage reduction goals within targeted areas over the 24 month grant period as stated in your application. HUD will also be requiring you to report the number of full-time equivalent positions for law enforcement and security services. Thirdly, you will be reporting on PHDEP-supported activities for residents broken out by: (1) youth; and (2) adults, families, or communities. For each category of PHDEP-supported activities, other than law enforcement, you will be required to report program or activity goals that are specific, measurable and were contained in your application, the results achieved and the total hours of participation in the activity. Lastly, you will be required to have an independent survey organization conduct an annual resident survey within the PHDEP targeted developments to determine if residents feel safer than before PHDEP activities began. (4) These PHDEP Semi-Annual Performance Reports shall cover the periods ending June 30 and December 31, and must be submitted to HUD by July 30 and January 31 of each year. You must submit these reports electronically. Access to grants funds will be denied if these reports are not received on a timely basis. (5) At grant completion, you must comply with the closeout requirements described in Public Housing Notice PIH 98-60 (HA), entitled ``Grant Closeout Procedures,'' and, when appropriate, in the return of grant funds not expended according to applicable requirements. (H) Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing The first two sentences of the requirement in Section II.(D) of the General Section of this SuperNOFA do not apply to this program. V. Application Selection Process (A) Rating and Ranking (1) General. HUD will rate and rank applications based on the 5 rating factors listed in Section V(B) of this PHDEP section of the SuperNOFA, below. HUD will select and fund the highest ranking applications based on total score, and continue the process until all funds allocated to it have been awarded or to the point where there are insufficient acceptable applications for to award funds. The maximum number of points for this program is 102. This includes two EZ/EC bonus points, as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA, and included under Rating Factor 3. (2) Tiebreakers. In the event of a tie, HUD will select the highest ranking application that can be fully funded. In the event that two eligible applications receive the same score, and neither can be funded because of insufficient funds, the applicant with the highest score in rating factor two will be funded. If rating factor two is scored identically, the scores in rating factors one and four will be compared in that order, until one of the applications receives a higher score. If both applications still score the same then the application which requests the least funding will be selected in order to promote the more efficient use of resources. (B) Factors For Award to Evaluate and Rank Applications. Your application must address the five (5) factors, and subfactors listed below. The maximum number of points for this program is 102. This includes the two bonus points for EZ/EC. Your application must receive a score of at least 70 points to be eligible for funding. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (20 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have the capacity, the proper organizational experience and resources to implement the proposed activities in a timely and effective manner. The rating of the ``applicant'' or the ``applicant's organization and staff'' for technical merit, unless otherwise specified, includes any subcontractors, consultants, subrecipients, and members of consortia which are firmly committed to your project. In rating this factor, HUD will consider the following: (1) (10 points.) The knowledge and experience of your staff and your administrative capability to manage grants of this size and type. This includes your administrative support and procurement entities, defined organizational lines of authority, and demonstrated fiscal management capacity. (2) (10 points.) Past performance in administering Drug Elimination grants and/or other Federal, state or local grants of similar size and complexity during the last 3 years. You must identify your participation in HUD grant programs within the last three years and discuss the degree of your success in implementing planned activities, achieving program goals and objectives, timely drawdown of funds, timely submission of required reports with satisfactory outcomes within budget and schedule, audit compliance, whether there are, and the extent of any, unresolved findings and/or outstanding recommendations from prior HUD reviews or audits undertaken by HUD, HUD-Office of Inspector General, the General Accounting Office (GAO) or independent public accountants (IPAs). For PHAs (and TDHEs that had previously applied as IHAs), HUD will consider the results of: PHMAP and more specifically Security Indicator #8, physical inspections, agency monitoring of records, Line of Credit Control System Reports (LOCCS) on the status of prior grants, audits and other relevant information available to HUD on your capacity to undertake this grant. In response to HUD-OIG audit findings concerning outstanding, unexpended PHDEP funds remaining from prior grants, HUD will reduce your score by two (2) points for every open PHDEP grant for FY 91 through FY 95 without HUD approved extensions or waivers. HUD will use the LOCCS disbursement system as of the date the application is received to verify grant status. [[Page 9753]] Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (25 Points) This factor examines the extent to which there is a need for funding the proposed program activities to address a documented problem in your proposed target area (i.e., the degree of the severity of the drug-related crime problem in the project proposed for funding). In responding to this factor, you will be evaluated on: (1) the extent to which a critical level of need for your proposed activities is explained; and (2) the urgency of meeting the need in the target area. You must include in your response a description of the extent and nature of drug-related crime ``in or around'' the housing units or developments proposed for funding. Applicants will be evaluated on the following: (1) (20 points) ``Objective Crime Data'' relevant to your target area. To the extent that you can provide objective drug-related crime data specific to the community or targeted development proposed for funding, you will be awarded up to 20 points. Objective crime data must include the most current and specific Part I Crime data and relevant Part II Crime data available from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR) system or the local law enforcement's crime statistics. Part I Crimes include: homicide; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; burglary; larceny; auto theft; and arson. Part II drug-related crimes include: drug abuse violations; simple assault; vandalism; weapons violations; and other crimes which you are proposing to be targeted as part of your grant. In assessing this subfactor, HUD will consider the extent of specificity that the statistical data is provided and the data's specificity to the targeted sites (e.g., data specific to those targeted developments proposed for funding by Part I crime type versus HA/TDHE-wide data by aggregated Part I crimes). The objective crime data provided in your application will become a ``baseline'' against which the success of your grant activities will be measured if funded. You will also be required to report not only this objective crime data in your first PHDEP Semiannual Performance Report but your goal(s) for reducing drug-related crime in the developments targeted under your grant. Your grant will be measured against these targets. This information will also support the ONDCP's National Drug Control Strategy's Goal 2 to, ``increase the safety of America's citizens by substantially reducing drug-related crime and violence.'' If you can not provide objective crime data, you will receive 5 points for including: (a) The reasons why objective crime data can not be obtained; (b) The efforts being made to obtain it; (c) What efforts will be made during the grant period to begin obtaining the data; and (d) An explanation of how you plan to measure how grant activities will result in reducing drug-related crime in the targeted developments and what will be used as a baseline. If you can not provide objective crime data and are awarded an FY 99 PHDEP grant, you will be required to provide baseline objective crime data in your first PHDEP semi- annual report. Such data may include police records or other verifiable information from records on the types or sources of drug related crime in the targeted developments and surrounding area, PHA/Tribe or TDHE wide, or at jurisdictional level. (2) (5 Points) Other Data Supporting the extent of Drug and Drug- related Crime. You must identify supporting data indicating the extent of drugs and drug-related crime problems in the developments proposed for assistance under your program. HUD will consider the extent and quality of the data provided. Examples of the data include: (a) Surveys of residents and staff in your targeted developments about drugs and drug-related crime or on-site reviews to determine drug/crime activity; (b) Government or scholarly studies or other research in the past year that analyze drug-related crime activity in your targeted developments. (c) Annual vandalism cost at your targeted developments, to include elevator vandalism (where appropriate) and other vandalism attributable to drug-related crime as a ratio to total annual approved budget for the targeted developments. (d) Information from schools, health service providers, residents and Federal, State, local, and Tribal officials, and the verifiable opinions and observations of individuals having direct knowledge of drug-related crime and the nature and frequency of these problems in developments proposed for assistance. (These individuals may include Federal, State, Tribal, and local government law enforcement officials, resident or community leaders, school officials, community medical officials, substance abuse, treatment (dependency/remission) or counseling professionals, or other social service providers). (e) The school dropout rate and level of absenteeism for youth that you can relate to drug-related crime as a percentage or ratio of the rate outside the area. (f) To the extent that your community's Consolidated Plan identifies the level of the problem and the urgency in meeting the need, references to these documents should be included in your response. The Department will review more favorably applicants who used these documents to identify need, when applicable. (g) The number of lease terminations or evictions for drug-related crime at the targeted developments; and (h) The number of emergency room admissions for drug use or that result from drug-related crime. Such information may be obtained from police Departments and/or fire departments, emergency medical service agencies and hospitals. (i) The number of police calls for service from housing authority developments that include resident initiated calls, officer-initiated calls, domestic violence calls, drug distribution complaints, found drug paraphernalia, gang activity, graffiti that reflects drugs or gang-related activity, vandalism, drug arrests, and abandoned vehicles. You should show these as a ratio of calls for service to calls in the community as a whole. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach--(Quality of the Plan) (35 Points) This factor examines the quality and effectiveness of your proposed work plan. In rating this factor, HUD will consider the impact of your activities on the drug and drug-related crime problems identified in Factor 2 and the extent to which you identify attainable goals, objectives, and performance measures to ensure that; tangible benefits can be attained by the community and by your target population. Your application must include a detailed narrative describing: each proposed activity for your developments proposed for assistance; the amount and extent of resources committed to each activity or service proposed; measurable goals and objectives for all major program activities that focus on outcome and results; and the process used to collect the data needed to report progress made against these goals. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the following: (1) The quality of your plan to address the drug-related crime problem, and the problems associated with drug-related crime in your developments proposed for funding, the resources allocated, and how well the proposed activities fit with the plan, including: [[Page 9754]] (a) The extent to which you have stated: (i) Performance goals that will measure program outcomes; (ii) The actual baseline data which will establish a starting point against which program outcomes will be measured and stated expected results for all major grant activities proposed in your application; (iii) What performance measurement system exists for providing information to HUD semi-annually on progress made in achieving the established outcome goals. Please note: If your application is funded, this information will be the basis for required semi-annual reporting throughout your grant period. (b) The extent to which you have designed your major activities to meet stated, measurable goals and objectives for drug and drug-related crime reduction. The extent to which your goals and objectives focus on program outcomes and results in addition to ``process or output'' data measures. While measures of process or outputs (number of residents trained) are important, they do not measure program outcomes. Outcomes include accomplishments, results, impact, and the ultimate effects of your program on the drug or crime problem in your target/project area. The goals must be objective, quantifiable, and/or qualitative and they must be stated in such a way that at the end of the 24 month grant, one can determine if the activities were effective. (c) The extent and quality of your plan in defining specific crime reduction goals that are specific and measurable, and defining ``baselines from objective crime'' data in Factor 2. For example, eliminate or reduce crime and drug-related crime is not specific nor measurable, whereas a goal of, ``reducing Part 1 reported homicides or Part II drug abuse, etc. by 5% in development X by the end of the 24 month grant period based on measurements against the baseline year crime selection rate in the targeted development X as stated in the application,'' is specific and measurable. (d) The rationale for your proposed activities and methods used including evidence that proposed activities have been effective in similar circumstances in controlling drug-related crime. If you are proposing new methods for which there is limited knowledge of the effectiveness, you should provide the basis for modifying past practices and rationale for why you believe the modification will yield more effective results. If you are proposing PHDEP supported activities for residents, HUD will evaluate the quality and extent to which you provide measurable, specific and objective goals and objectives for your major activities and programs; and how the data to measure success against your goals will be obtained. HUD will award greater points if you report youth activities separately from activities for families, adults, or communities. (2) Two bonus points will be awarded for EZs/ECs as described in the General Section of this SuperNOFA. For bonus points related to activities located in Empowerment Zones or Enterprise Communities, the applicant must demonstrate that there is a connection between such EZ or EC and tenant, local government, and local community support and participation in the design and implementation of the proposed activities to be funded under this program. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources--(Support of Residents, the Local Government and the Community in Planning and Implementing the Proposed Activities) (10 Points) This factor addresses your ability to secure community and government resources that can be combined with HUD's program resources to achieve program purposes. (1) In assessing this factor, HUD will consider the following: (a) Evidence of commitment of funding, staff, or in-kind resources, partnership agreements, and on-going or planned cooperative efforts with law enforcement agencies, memoranda of understanding, or agreements to participate. Such commitments must be signed by an official of the organization legally able to make commitments for the organization. (b) This evidence of commitment must include organization name, resources, and responsibilities of each participant. This also includes interagency activities already undertaken, participation in local, state, Tribal or Federal anti-drug related crime efforts such as: education, training and employment provision components of Welfare Reform efforts, ``One Strike and You're Out,'' Operation Weed and Seed, Neighborhood Networks, Campus of Learners, Computerized Community Connections, Operation Safe Home, Safe Neighborhood Anti-drug Program (SNAP), local law enforcement initiatives and/or successful coordination of its law enforcement, or other activities with local, state, Tribal or Federal law enforcement agencies. Additional points will be given if your activities supporting these efforts extend beyond the 24 month grant period. (2) In evaluating this factor, HUD will also consider the extent to which these initiatives are used to leverage resources for your housing authority community, and are part of the comprehensive plan and performance measures outlines in Rating Factor 3, Soundness of Approach--Quality of the Plan. (a) Your application must describe what role residents in your targeted developments, applicable community leaders and organizations, and law enforcement agencies have had in planning the activities described in your application and what role they will have in carrying out such activities. (b) Your application must include a discussion of the extent to which community representatives and Tribal, local, state and Federal Government officials, including law enforcement agency officials were actively involved in the design and implementation of your plan and will continue to be involved in implementing such activities during and after the period of your PHDEP funding. (c) Your application must demonstrate the extent to which the relevant governmental jurisdiction has met its local law enforcement obligations under the Cooperation Agreement with your organization (as required by the Annual Contributions Contract with HUD). You must describe the current level of baseline local law enforcement services being provided to your housing authority/developments proposed for assistance. Rating Factor 5: Comprehensiveness and Coordination (10 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have coordinated your activities with other known organizations, participate or promote participation in your Community's Consolidated Planning Process, and is working towards addressing a need in a holistic and comprehensive manner through linkages with other activities in your community. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you can demonstrate you have: (1) Coordinated your proposed activities with those of other groups or organizations prior to submission in order to best complement, support and coordinate all known activities and if funded, the specific steps you will take to share information on solutions and outcomes with others. Any written agreements, memoranda of understanding in place, or that will be in place after award should be described. [[Page 9755]] (2) Taken or will take specific steps to become active in your community's Consolidated Planning process (including the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice) established to identify and address a need/problem that is related to the activities you propose. (3) Taken or will take specific steps to develop linkages to coordinate comprehensive solutions through meetings, information networks, planning processes or other mechanisms with: (a) Other HUD-funded projects/activities outside the scope of those covered by the Consolidated Plan; and (b) Other Federal, State, or locally funded activities, including those proposed, or on-going in the community. VI. Application Submission Requirements (A) You must comply with the submission requirements described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. To qualify for a grant under this program, your application submitted to HUD must also include those requirements listed under Section V., above, of the PHDEP section of this SuperNOFA, including the plan to address the problem of drug- related crime in the developments proposed for funding. You must accurately complete the form for HUD's application database entry. The form, with examples, is provided in the application kit. (B) You must submit no more than one application per housing authority (or per Tribe or TDHE on behalf of the Tribe) for each drug elimination program contained in this PHDEP section of the SuperNOFA. In addition, joint applications that include more than one housing authority (or TDHE representing the Tribe) are permitted only in those cases where the HAs have a single administration (such as HAs managing another HA under contract or HAs sharing a common executive director). In those cases, a separate budget, plan and timetable, and unit count shall be supplied in the application. In addition, you must respond to the factors for award for each HA for which you are acting as administrator and requesting funds, if your responses would be different (e.g., the HAs are in different jurisdictions and, therefore, the Consolidated Plans, crime data, etc. would all be different). The application kit includes the forms, certifications and assurances listed in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. (C) Each PHDEP application must conform to the requirements of this PHDEP section of the SuperNOFA and the PHDEP application kit, both in format and content. Each PHDEP application must include the following items: (1) An application cover letter. (2) A summary of the proposed program activities in five (5) sentences or less. (3) A description of the subgrantees, if applicable. The description must include the names of the subgrantees, as well as the relative roles and contributions of each subgrantee in implementing the PHDEP grant activities. (4) An overall budget and timetable that includes separate budgets, goals, and timetables for each activity, and addresses milestones towards achieving each described goal. You must also describe the contributions and implementation responsibilities of each partner for each activity, goal, and milestone. (5) A description of the number of staff, the titles, professional qualifications, and respective roles of the staff assigned full or part-time to grant implementation. (6) Your plan and lines of accountability (including an organization chart) for implementing the grant activity, coordinating the partnership, and assuring that the commitment made by you and your subgrantees will be met. VII. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section of this SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. VIII. Environmental Requirements It is anticipated that activities under the PHDEP will be categorically excluded under 24 CFR 50.19(b)(4), (b)(12), or (b)(13). If grant funds will be used to cover the cost of any non-exempt activities, HUD will perform an environmental review to the extent required by 24 CFR part 50, prior to grant awards. IX. Authority Chapter 2, Subtitle C, Title V of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 11901 et. seq), as amended by section 581 of the National Affordable Housing Act of 1990 (Pub.L. 101-625, approved November 28, 1990) (NAHA), and section 161 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (Pub.L. 102-550, approved October 28, 1992 (HCDA 1992). The regulations for this program are found in 24 CFR part 761, Drug Elimination Programs. Appendix A Additional Information on High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTAs). These areas are designated as HIDTAs by the Director, Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), pursuant to the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. As of October 30, 1998, the following areas were confirmed by the ONDCP as designated HIDTAs: --New York/New Jersey HIDTA consists of the city of New York and all the municipalities therein and Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester Counties (in New York), and Union, Hudson, Essex, Bergen, and Passaic Counties (in New Jersey) and all municipalities therein. --Washington, DC/Baltimore HIDTA consists of Washington, DC; the City of Baltimore, and Baltimore, Howard, Anne Arundel, Prince George's, Montgomery and Charles Counties (in Maryland); and the City of Alexandria, and Arlington, Fairfax, Prince William, and Loudoun Counties (in Virginia) and all municipalities therein. --South Florida HIDTA consists of the city of Miami and the surrounding areas of Broward, Dade, and Monroe Counties and all municipalities therein. --Houston HIDTA consists of the city of Houston and surrounding areas of Harris, and Galveston Counties, and Aransas, Brooks, Jim Wells, Kenedy, Kleberg, Nueces, Refugio, San Patricio, and Victoria counties, and all municipalities therein; --Lake County HIDTA consists of Lake County, Indiana, and all municipalities therein. --Gulf Coast HIDTA consist of Baldwin, Jefferson, Mobile, and Montgomery Counties (in Alabama); Caddo, East Baton Rouge, Jefferson, and Orleans Parishes (in Louisiana); and Hancock, Harrison, Hinds, and Jackson Counties (in Mississippi) and all the municipalities therein. --Midwest HIDTA consists of Muscatine, Polk, Pottawattamie, Scott and Woodbury Counties (in Iowa); Cherokee, Crawford, Johnson, Labette, Leavenworth, Saline, Seward, and Wyandotte Counties (in Kansas); Cape Garardeau, Christian, Clay, Jackson, Lafayette, Lawrence, Ray, Scott, and St. Charles Counties, and the City of St. Louis (in Missouri); Dakota, Dawson, Douglas, Hall, Lancaster, Sarpy, and Scott's Bluff Counties (in Nebraska); Clay, Codington, Custer, Fall River, Lawrence, Lincoln, Meade, Minnehaha, Pennington, Union, and Yankton Counties (in South Dakota); and all municipalities therein. --Rocky Mountains HIDTA consists of Adams, Arapahoe, Denver, Douglas, Eagle, El Paso, Garfield, Jefferson, La Plata, and Mesa Counties (in Colorado); Davis, Salt Lake, Summit, Utah, and Weber Counties (in Utah); and Laramie, Natrona, and Sweetwater Counties (in Wyoming) and all municipalities therein. --Southwest Border HIDTA consists of San Diego and Imperial Counties (in California), and all municipalities therein; Yuma, Maricopa, Pinal, Pima, Santa Cruz, and Cochise Counties, (in Arizona) and all municipalities therein; Bernalillo, Hidalgo, Grant, Luna, Dona Ana, Eddy, Lea, and Otero, Chaves, and Lincoln counties, (in New Mexico) and all municipalities therein; El Paso, Hudspeth, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, Brewster, Pecos, Terrell, Crockett Counties (in West Texas) and all [[Page 9756]] municipalities therein; Bexar, Val Verde, Kinney, Maverick, Zavala, Dimmit, La Salle, Webb, Zapata, Jim Hogg, Starr, Hildago, Willacy and Cameron Counties (in South Texas) and all municipalities therein. --Northwest HIDTA consists of King, Pierce, Skagit, Snohomish, Thurston, Whatcom and Yakima Counties (in the State of Washington) and all municipalities therein. --Los Angeles HIDTA consists of the city of Los Angeles and surrounding areas of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and San Bernadino Counties, and all municipalities therein. --Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands HIDTA consists of the U.S. territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. --San Francisco Bay Area HIDTA consists of Alameda, Contra Costa, Lake, Marin, Monterey, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Sonoma counties and all the municipalities therein. --Appalachia HIDTA consist of Adair, Bell, Breathitt, Clay, Clinton, Cumberland, Floyd, Harlan, Jackson, Knott, Knox, Laurel, Lee, Leslie, McCreary, Magoffin, Marion, Monroe, Owsley, Perry, Pike, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Taylor, Wayne, and Whitley counties in Kentucky; Boone, Braxton, Cabell, Gilmer, Lewis, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, McDowell, Mingo and Wayne Counties in West Virginia, Bledsoe, Campbell, Claiborne, Clay, Cocke, Cumberland, Fentress, Franklin, Grainger, Greene, Grundy, Hamblen, Hancock, Hawkins, Jackson, Jefferson, Macon, Marion, Overton, Pickett, Putnam, Rhea, Scott, Sequatchie, Sevier, Unicoi, Van Buren and White Counties in Tennessee and all the municipalities therein. --Central Florida HIDTA consists of Hillsborough, Orange, Osceola, Pinellas, Polk, Seminole, and Volusia counties and all the municipalities therein. --Chicago HIDTA consists of Cook County, incorporating the City of Chicago. --Atlanta HIDTA consists of Fulton, Dekalb counties and the City of Atlanta. --Milwaukee HIDTA consists of Milwaukee county and all the municipalities therein. --Southeastern Michigan HIDTA consists of Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, and Washtenaw counties and all the municipalities therein. --Philadelphia/Camden HIDTA: consists of the Cities of Philadelphia and Camden. --North Texas HIDTA consists of the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, the surrounding counties of Collin, Dallas, Ellis, Henderson, Hood, Hunt, Johnson, Lubbock, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall and Tarrant, Texas and all the municipalities therein. For further information on HIDTAs contact Rich Yamamoto, at the ONDCP, Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC 20500 on (202) 395-6755 and/or Catherine S. Barker on (202) 395-6603, fax (202) 395-6841. BILLING CODE 4210-32-P [[Page 9757]] [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN26FE99.031 BILLING CODE 4210-32-C [[Page 9759]] Funding Availability for the New Approach Anti-Drug Program (Formerly Known as the Safe Neighborhood Grant Program) Program Overview Purpose of the Program. The purpose of this program is to provide funding to owners or managers of certain housing developments to: (1) augment security; (2) assist in the investigation and prosecution of drug-related criminal activity in and around the housing developments; and (3) provide for the development of capital improvements directly relating to the security of the developments. With these grants, HUD is taking a comprehensive neighborhood/community-based approach to crime prevention. In applying, you will be required to demonstrate that you have formed a partnership with units of general local government, including with the local law enforcement agency to play key roles in this partnership. Available Funds. Approximately $28.3 million, which includes FY 1998 carryover funds. Eligible Applicants. Eligible applicants include: units of general local government, public housing agencies (PHAs), Indian tribes or Tribally Designated Housing Entities (TDHEs), and owners of assisted housing developments. To be an eligible applicant you must be an owner of an assisted housing development, as defined in this program section of the SuperNOFA, except a unit of general local government may qualify if it operates an assisted housing development. The assisted housing development that makes a PHA eligible may not be assisted under the United States Housing Act of 1937 with the exception of project-based Section 8 assistance. Similarly, for an Indian tribe or a TDHE, the development may not be formerly assisted under those programs. Application Deadline. July 1, 1999. Match. None. Additional Information If you are interested in applying for funding under this program, please review carefully the General Section of this SuperNOFA and the following additional information. Application Due Date. Your application must be physically received on or before 6:00 pm, local time on July 1, 1999 at the address shown below. See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for specific procedures governing the form of application submission (e.g., mailed applications, express mail, overnight delivery, or hand carried). Address for Submitting Applications. An original and two copies of your application must be physically received on or before the application deadline at the local HUD Field Office, Attention: Director of Multifamily Housing Programs or, in the case of the Native American population, to the local HUD Administrator, Area Offices of Native American Programs (AONAPs), as appropriate. See Appendix A to this NOFA for a list of local HUD Field Offices, AONAPs, and their respective jurisdictions. For Application Kits. For an application kit and any supplemental information, please call the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD- 8929. When requesting an application kit, please refer to the New Approach Anti-Drug Program, and provide your name, address (including zip code) and telephone number (including area code). Persons with hearing or speech impairments may call the Center's TTY number at 1- 800-483-2209. An application kit also will be available on the Internet through the HUD web site at http://www.HUD.gov. For Further Information and Technical Assistance. For program, policy, and other guidance, contact Henry Colonna, Department of Housing and Urban Development, Virginia State Office, 3600 West Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23230-4920, telephone (804) 278-4500, x 3027, or (804) 278-4501 (the TTY number). II. Amount Allocated (A) Available Funding Approximately $28.3 million is available for funding under the New Approach Anti-Drug Program, as provided in the FY 1999 Appropriations Act, including FY 1998 carryover funding. (B) Maximum Grant Award The maximum grant award amount is limited to $250,000 per application. (C) Reduction of Requested Grant Amounts You may be awarded an amount less than requested if: (1) HUD determines that some elements of the proposed action plan are ineligible for funding; (2) HUD determines the amount requested for an eligible activity and/or any budget line item is not cost effective; (3) Insufficient amounts remain under the allocation to fund the full amount you requested, and HUD determines that partial funding is a viable option; or (4) HUD determines that a reduced grant would prevent duplicative Federal funding. III. Definitions, Program Description; Eligible Applicants; Eligible Activities (A) Definitions (1) Assisted Housing Development. For purposes of this program, the term ``assisted housing development'' means five or more dwelling units in a building or five or more adjoining, adjacent, or scattered site (within a single neighborhood) dwelling units, having common ownership and project identity. Some or all of the units must be receiving a project-based subsidy from a unit of government at the Federal, State, or local level, or from a private nonprofit entity. This subsidy must be associated with a requirement and/or contractual agreement that all or a portion of the units be occupied by households with incomes at or below those of families at the low-income limit as defined by the United States Housing Act of 1937. (2) Assisted Housing Unit. For purposes of this program, the term ``assisted housing unit'' means a unit within an assisted housing development for which occupancy is restricted to households with incomes at or below that of ``low-income families'' as defined by the U.S. Housing Act of 1937 or to households meeting an income standard below that defined as ``low-income;'' and rents are restricted to amounts that the public or nonprofit entity determines to be affordable. (3) Augmented Services. For purposes of this program, augmented services are activities which exceed current levels of services or ``baseline'' services provided by any other parties signing the memorandum of understanding required for this program. (4) Drug-related crime. For purposes of this New Approach Anti-Drug Program, the term ``drug-related crime'' means drug-related crime as defined in 42 U.S.C. 11905(2) and Part I Crime and Part II Crime as defined by the Uniform Crime Reporting System. (5) Eligible project area. For purposes of the New Approach Anti- Drug Program, the term ``neighborhood'' means a geographic area within a jurisdiction of a unit of general local government designated in comprehensive plans, ordinances, or other local documents as a neighborhood, village, or similar geographical designation. If, however, the unit of general local government has a population of less than 25,000 persons, then ``neighborhood'' means [[Page 9760]] the entire jurisdiction of the unit of general local government. (c) A project area must include at least one assisted housing development under: (i) Section 221(d)(3), section 221(d)(4), or section 236 of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715l, 1715z-1), provided that such development has been provided a Below Market Interest Rate mortgage, interest reduction payments, or project-based assistance under Rent Supplement, Rental Assistance Payments (RAP) or Section 8 programs. An FHA-insured project that has no project-based subsidy does not qualify as an area for eligibility even though it houses tenants receiving tenant-based assistance, such as Section 8 rental vouchers or certificates. (ii) Section 101 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1965 (12 U.S.C. 1701s); or (iii) Section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f). This includes housing with project-based Section 8 assistance, whether or not the mortgage was insured by HUD-FHA, but does not include projects which receive only Section 8 tenant-based assistance (i.e., certificates or vouchers). (5) Project-based Subsidies. For purposes of this program, the term ``project-based subsidies'' means financial assistance that is initially designated and assigned by the funding source specifically for the project rather than to eligible assisted resident households which might also benefit from these subsidies, and provided on a one time up-front or on a periodic basis to the project or its owner to write down, subsidize, or waive: project development costs; costs of financing; project operating costs (including but are not limited to: utilities, taxes, fees, maintenance and debt service payments); owner taxes; unit rent levels; or tenant rent payments. (B) Program description (1) Purpose. The purpose of these competitive grants is to assist entities managing or operating Federally assisted multifamily housing developments, public and Indian housing developments (including those Indian housing units formerly defined as public housing under section 3 of the U.S. Housing Act of 1937 and now counted as current assisted stock under the Indian Housing Block Grant Program), or other multifamily-housing developments for low-income families supported by non-Federal governmental housing entities or similar housing developments supported by nonprofit private sources, to augment security (including personnel costs); assist in the investigation and/ or prosecution of drug-related criminal activity in and around such developments, and provide for capital improvements that enhance security at these developments. Drug- and crime-fighting activities, if only directed to a single assisted housing development, may have the unfortunate effect of simply moving the problem to nearby housing and businesses. The long term solution to the crime problems of assisted housing developments and their surrounding neighborhoods rest in a comprehensive approach that changes the conditions--and the culture that exists. HUD believes that crime fighting efforts are most effective when partnering takes place with law-enforcement agencies at various levels and with a full range of community stakeholders (such as PHAs and TDHEs). Therefore, to address crime in a comprehensive manner to receive funding, you must take the following actions: (a) Have a subgrantee or subrecipient relationship with the local police department and the local district attorney or prosecutor's office. If the local police department, local district attorney or prosecutor's office does not have the legal authority to accept program funds or enter into a binding agreement with you, then you must provide funds through the unit of general local government--city or county. (b) Enter into Memorandums of Understanding with the owners of, and resident organizations in, assisted housing developments that receive grant funds from you. (c) Encourage other neighborhood based entities to participate in your program of activities through partnership arrangements. Such entities are community residents; neighborhood businesses; and non- profit providers of support services, including spiritually-based organizations and their affiliates. (2) Implementation Principles. HUD has established the following principles in implementing the New Approach Anti-Drug Program Grants: (a) Comprehensive Approach. With these grants, HUD is taking a comprehensive neighborhood/community-based approach to crime. The long term solution to the crime problems of assisted housing developments and their surrounding neighborhoods rests in changing the conditions-- and the culture that exists. (b) Required Partnerships. You will be required to demonstrate that you have formed a partnership with units of general local government, with the local police department and the local district attorney or prosecutor's office playing key roles in this partnership. You must also form partnerships with the following entities, if they will receive funding from you: (i) All owners of assisted housing developments in the targeted neighborhood; and (ii) Resident organizations of these assisted housing developments. (c) Encouraging Partnerships. (i) HUD encourages the use of effective working partnerships in new locations to leverage the many Federal resources that are available to eliminate crime in and around public and assisted housing developments through the Drug Elimination Grant, Operation Safe Home, and Weed and Seed programs; and partnering with the U.S. Attorney's Office, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Drug Enforcement Agency. HUD now wishes to encourage these successful partnerships to address similar problems in and around privately-owned, Federally assisted housing. In addition to providing points for applications with these partnerships, HUD is requiring that at least one project in each targeted neighborhood be multifamily housing with either: (A) A HUD-insured, held, or direct mortgage and Rental Assistance Payments (RAP), Rent Supplement, or interest reduction payments; or (B) Section 8 project-based assistance with or without HUD interest in the project mortgage. (ii) This emphasis on HUD assisted privately-owned housing does not negate the eligibility of other low-income housing developments assisted by Federal, State, and local government, and not-for-profit sources to apply for the New Approach Anti-Drug Program. By awarding points for neighborhoods with high concentrations of assisted housing, HUD is encouraging you to address the needs of multiple assisted housing developments which may feature a mix of ownership types and subsidy sources. (d) Complying with Civil Rights Requirements. With the very real need to protect occupants of HUD-sponsored housing and the areas around the housing, the civil rights of all citizens must be protected. Your proposed strategies should be developed to ensure that crime-fighting and drug prevention activities are not undertaken in such a manner that civil rights or fair housing statutes are violated. Profiling on any prohibited basis is not allowed. In addition, all segments of the population should be represented in developing and implementing crime- fighting strategies. [[Page 9761]] (e) Coordination with Other Law Enforcement Efforts. In addition to working closely with residents and local governing bodies, it is critically important that owners establish ongoing working relationships with Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies in their efforts to address crime and violence in and around their housing developments. HUD firmly believes that the war on crime and violence in assisted housing can only be won through the concerted and cooperative efforts of owners and law enforcement agencies working together in cooperation with residents and local governing bodies. HUD encourages owners to participate in Departmental and other Federal law enforcement agencies' programs such as: Operation Safe Home, Operation Weed and Seed through the Department of Justice and the Safe Neighborhood Action Program (SNAP). The use of New Approach Anti-Drug funds, however, is to be part of a comprehensive approach. These funds may indirectly support other Federal law enforcement activities provided that use is consistent with the comprehensive approach. (f) Safe Neighborhood Action Program (SNAP) Grants. (i) The New Approach Anti-Drug Program was formerly known as the Safe Neighborhood Action Program, announced June 12, 1994 by HUD, the National Assisted Housing Management Association (NAHMA), and the U.S. Conference of Mayors (USCM). The New Approach Anti-Drug Program was expanded from the SNAP Program to include funds to augment security; assist in the investigation and prosecution of drug related criminal activity in and around the housing developments; and provide for the development of capital improvements directly related to the security of the developments. SNAP is an anti-crime and empowerment strategies initiative in HUD assisted housing neighborhoods in 14 SNAP cities. The major thrust of SNAP is the formation of local partnerships in 14 targeted cities where ideas and resources from government, owners and managers of assisted housing, residents, service providers, law enforcement officials, and other community groups meet to work on innovative, neighborhood anti-crime strategies. (ii) There is no funding associated with SNAP, which relies on existing ideas and resources of the participants. Some common initiatives from these SNAP teams have included the following: community policing; crime watch programs; tenant selection policies; leadership training; individual development or job skills training; expansion of youth activities; police tip line or form; community centers; anti-gang initiatives; police training for security officers; environmental improvements; and a needs assessment survey to determine community needs. (iii) In addition, a HUD-sponsored initiative to increase the presence of AmeriCorps' VISTAs in assisted housing units has led to the placement of 25 VISTAs on 12 SNAP teams. The AmeriCorps VISTA program, which incorporates a theme of working within the community to find solutions to community needs, has provided additional technical assistance to the SNAP teams. (iv) The cities participating in the SNAP initiative include: Atlanta, Ga; Boston, Mass; Denver, Co; Houston, TX; Newark, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Baltimore, MD; Columbus, OH; Detroit, MI; Los Angeles, CA; New Orleans, LA; Little Rock, AR; Richmond, VA; and Washington, DC. (v) For more information on SNAP, contact Henry Colonna, National SNAP Coordinator, Virginia State Office, 3600 West Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23230-4920; telephone (804) 278-4500, extension 3027; or (804) 278-4501 (TTY). For more information on AmeriCorps' VISTAs in Assisted Housing, contact Deanna E. Beaudoin, National VISTAs in Assisted Housing Coordinator, Colorado State Office, First Interstate Tower North, 633 17th Street, Denver, CO 80202; telephone (303) 672- 5291, extension 1068; or (303) 672-5248 (TTY). These numbers are not toll-free. (C) Eligible Applicants (1) General. To be an eligible applicant: (a) You must be: (i) The owner of a federally-assisted housing development. If you are a unit of general local government you do not need to be the owner, but must be the operator of such housing. (A TDHE is not a unit of general local government.); (ii) The owner of an assisted housing development that is assisted by a non-Federal governmental entity or similar housing development supported by nonprofit sources. If you are a unit of general local government, you do not need to be the owner, but must be the operator of such housing; (iii) A PHA. To be eligible to apply you must own an assisted housing development that is not assisted under the United States Housing Act of 1937, with the exception of project-based assistance under section 8 of the Act. If you do not own such an assisted housing development, you may still participate in the New Approach Anti-Drug Program as a subgrantee or subrecipient of an eligible applicant; or (iv) An Indian tribe or TDHE. To be eligible to apply you must own an assisted housing development that was not formerly assisted under the United States Housing Act of 1937, with the exception of project- based assistance under section 8 of the Act. If you do not own such an assisted housing development, you may still participate in the New Approach Anti-Drug Program as a subgrantee or subrecipient of an eligible applicant; (b) The property that makes you eligible must be in the neighborhood to be assisted; and (c) You may not have any outstanding findings of civil rights violations. (See Section II(B) of the General Section of this SuperNOFA.) (2) Lead Applicant. Two or more eligible applicants may file a joint application. If filing jointly, you must designate one entity to be the lead applicant. The lead applicant will be the grantee if HUD funds your application. (D) Memorandum of Understanding You must include with your application Memorandums of Understanding (MOU) that you have entered with each required party. (See Section III(B) of this program section of the SuperNOFA). The MOU may indicate the agreement is subject to the actual receipt of funds from HUD. (1) Required Parties to the MOU. (a) You must sign a MOU that provides funds through a subgrantee or subrecipient relationship with the following entities: (i) The local police department; and (ii) The local district attorney's office or the local prosecutor's office. (b) If you provide funds to an owner or entity participating in the program, you also must sign a MOU with that owner or other entity; and (c) You also must sign an MOU with each resident organization that will receive grant funding through you. The resident organization must have been established by, and have a governing board consisting of, tenants in an assisted housing development in the neighborhood. The resident organization's commitment must describe the extent to which it is involved in the planning, and will be participating in, and supporting, your action plan. (d) All parties signing the MOU must have the legal authority to enter into a binding agreement with you. (2) Content of MOU. This MOU must commit these entities to actively support the grant project in partnership with you. The MOU must also describe: [[Page 9762]] (a) The level of current services (baseline) being provided by these entities; (b) The level of services above this baseline which the entities are committed to providing in support of your grant; (c) The amount of time to be devoted to the activities by each party; (d) The skills each party brings to assist in implementation of your specific action plan activities. Your MOU will be taken into account in reviewing and rating your application, so you should strive to be as specific as possible in your MOU document. (3) Encourage Partnerships. We encourage you to partner with other appropriate neighborhood and community stakeholders, including: neighborhood businesses and business associations; nonprofit service providers; neighborhood resident associations; and faith communities or religious institutions. You are encouraged to enter into MOUs with these entities but an MOU is not required. (E) Eligible Project Areas (1) HUD will award one grant per project neighborhood. The project area must be a ``neighborhood.'' (2) The project area must include at least one assisted housing development. See definition in Section III(A)(1) of this program section of the SuperNOFA. (3) You must provide documentation of the population used to define eligibility as a neighborhood. The documentation may include census data or documentation provided by local government officials. (F) Eligible Activities The following is a listing of eligible activities under this program and guidance as to their parameters: (1) Augmenting Security (Including Personnel). (a) General. You must document in your MOU(s) all security services above baseline established in your MOU. Anyone providing augmented security services must have liability insurance. (b) Baseline Services. Additional security services are permitted but must be over and above the local police department's current level of baseline services. If you are seeking funding for augmenting security, you must describe the local police department's current level of baseline services to the neighborhood (including ordinary and routine services, patrols, police officer responses to 911 communications and other calls for services, and investigative follow- up of criminal activity). Your description of baseline services must include the number of officers and the actual percent of their time assigned to the development(s) proposed for funding. For a proposed activity to be considered eligible as an augmented security activity, you must demonstrate to what extent the proposed funded activity will represent an increase over and above the baseline. (c) Police Presence. You may reimburse local law enforcement entities for the costs of additional police presence (police salaries and other expenses directly related to additional police presence or security that is over and above baseline services) in and around assisted housing developments in the neighborhood. Of the funds devoted to additional police presence, at least 70 percent of such reimbursed costs must be for police presence in assisted housing developments served and the remaining 30 percent must be for police presence within the project area. HUD is strongly encouraging that additional law enforcement in the assisted housing developments and surrounding neighborhoods be targeted to implementing an overall crime fighting strategy, rather than merely responding to crime emergencies. Two potentially effective anti-crime strategies that can benefit from additional police presence are: (i) Combined multi-agency task force initiatives, in which local and Federal law enforcement agencies pool resources, first, to infiltrate organizations that promote violent and/or drug-related crime in the neighborhood and, second, to initiate strategic and coordinated mass arrests to break up these organizations; and (ii) Community policing (i.e., sustained proactive police presence in the development or neighborhood, often conducted from an on site substation or mini-station, that involves crime prevention, citizen involvement, and other community service activities, as well as traditional law enforcement). If reimbursement is provided for community policing activities that are committed to occur over a period of at least 3 years and/or are conducted from a police substation or administration within the neighborhood, the costs during the grant period of constructing such a station or of equipping the substation with communications and security equipment to improve the collection, analysis and use of information about criminal activities in the properties and the neighborhood may be reimbursed. (d) Security Services Provided by Other Entities (such as the Owner of an Assisted Housing Development). (i) The activities of any contract security personnel funded under this Program must be coordinated with other law enforcement and crime prevention efforts under your proposed action plan. You must describe in your action plan your efforts to achieve this coordination. The coordination efforts must include frequent periodic scheduled meetings of security personnel with housing project management and residents, local police and, as appropriate, with other public law enforcement personnel, neighboring residents, landlords, and other neighborhood stakeholders. Any contract security personnel funded under this Program must meet State and local licensing requirements. (ii) You may only contract with a security service provider that has a policy manual that directs the activities of its personnel and contains the policies, procedures, and general orders that regulate conduct and describe in detail how jobs are to be performed. If you use your own staff to provide security services, then you must have such a policy manual. (2) Enhancing the Investigation and Prosecution of Drug-Related Crime. (a) Reimbursement of State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies. As the grantee, you may reimburse local or State prosecuting offices and related public agencies for activities, other than salaries or ineligible activities in Section III(G) of this program section of the SuperNOFA, related to the prosecution or investigation of crime committed in the neighborhood identified in your application. These costs are subject to a cost reimbursement agreement. Reimbursement must be for costs over and above what the office or agency incurred for such purposes for crimes committed in the same neighborhood during the period equal in length and immediately before the period of reimbursement. For any grant, at least 70 percent of reimbursed costs must be in connection with crimes committed in and around the assisted housing developments and the remainder of reimbursed costs directly related to crime committed within the neighborhood. (b) Hiring of Private Investigator Services. You may use grant funds to hire private investigator services to investigate crime in and around an assisted housing development and the surrounding neighborhood. You must explain why local law enforcement services are inadequate and justify the need for hiring private investigator services. [[Page 9763]] (3) Capital Improvements to Enhance Security. You may use grant funds for capital improvements to enhance security. You should, however, consider using other sources of funding for this purpose. These improvements must be accessible to persons with disabilities. For example, locks or buzzer systems that are not accessible to people with restricted or impaired strength, mobility, or hearing may not be funded by your grant. Capital improvements to implement defensible space concepts in the design and implementation of your enhanced security measures are eligible provided such design elements permit accessibility and visitability by persons with disabilities. Capital improvements to enhance security must comply with civil rights requirements and cannot exclude or segregate persons based upon their race, color, or national origin from benefits, services, and other terms and conditions of housing. Under the selection criterion entitled ``Quality of Plan,'' HUD will reward capital improvements to enhance the security of an entire neighborhood as opposed to specific projects at the expense of other dwellings in the neighborhood. The capital improvements may include, but are not limited to: (a) New construction or rehabilitation of structures housing police substations or mini-stations; (b) Installation of barriers (including speed bumps and fences) and appropriate use of close circuit television (CCTV), provided any barriers make reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities; (c) Improved door or window security such as locks, bolts, or bars; and (d) Landscaping or other reconfiguration of common areas to discourage drug-related criminal activities. (G) Ineligible Activities In addition to the ineligible activities mentioned elsewhere in this program section of the SuperNOFA, New Approach Anti-Drug Program Grant funding is not permitted for any of the activities listed below, unless otherwise specified in this program section of the SuperNOFA: (1) Crime prevention, treatment, or intervention activities; (2) Costs incurred before the effective date of the grant agreement, including but not limited to consultant fees related to the development of your application or the actual writing of your application; (3) Purchase of controlled substances for any purpose. Controlled substance has the meaning provided in section 102 of the Controlled Substance Act (21 U.S.C. 802); (4) Compensating informants, including confidential informants. These should be part of the baseline services provided and budgeted by local law enforcement agencies; or (5) Although participation in activities with Federal drug interdiction or drug enforcement agencies is encouraged, these grant funds may not be transferred to any Federal agency. Profiling on any prohibited basis is not allowed. (H) Threshold Requirements In addition to requirements listed in Section II of the General Section of the SuperNOFA, you are subject to the following: (a) You must show how you meet the eligibility requirements; and (b) The amount of funding requested must be within the maximum grant award amount. IV. Program Requirements The following requirements apply to all activities, programs, or functions used to plan, budget, implement, and evaluate the work funded under this program. (A) Grant Agreement After applications have been ranked and selected, HUD and a successful applicant will enter into a grant agreement setting forth the amount of the grant, the physical improvements or other eligible activities to be undertaken, financial controls, and special conditions, including sanctions for violation of the agreement. The Grant Agreement will incorporate your HUD approved application as may be amended by any special condition in the Grant Agreement. HUD will monitor your grant using your Grant Agreement to ensure that you have achieved commitments set out in your approved grant agreement. Failure to honor such commitments would be the basis for HUD determining your default of the Grant Agreement, and exercising available sanctions, including grant suspension, termination, and/or the recapture of your grant funds. (B) Requirements Governing Grant Administration, Audits and Cost Principles The policies, guidelines, and requirements of this NOFA, 48 CFR part 31, 24 CFR parts 44, 45, 84 and/or 85, OMB Circulars A-87 and/or A-122, other applicable administrative, audit, and cost principles and requirements, and the terms of grant/special conditions and subgrant agreements apply to your acceptance and use of funds. The requirements cited above, as applicable, must be followed in determining procedures and practices related to the separate accounting of grant funds from other grant sources, personnel compensation, travel, procurement, the timing of drawdowns, the reasonableness and allocation of costs, audits, reporting and closeout, budgeting, and preventing conflict of interests or duplicative charging of identical costs to two different funding sources. All costs must be reasonable and necessary. (C) Term of Grant Your grant funds must be expended within 24 months after HUD executes a Grant Agreement with you. There will be no extensions or waivers of this grant term. (D) Subgrants and Subcontracting (1) In accordance with your approved grant agreement, you may directly undertake any of the eligible activities under this NOFA, you may contract with a qualified third party, or you may make a subgrant to any entity approved by HUD as a member of the partnership, provided such entity is a unit of government, a prosecutor's office, a police department or a TDHE; is incorporated as a not-for-profit organization; or is an incorporated for-profit entity that owns and/or manages an assisted housing project benefiting from the grant. Resident groups that are not incorporated may participate in the implementation of the program, but may not receive funds as subgrantees. For-profit organizations other than owners or managers of an assisted housing development benefiting from the grant that have been approved by HUD as part of the partnership may only receive grant funds subject to the applicable Federal procurement procedures (See 24 CFR parts 84 or 85). (2) Subgrants may be made only under a written agreement executed between you, the grantee, and your subgrantee. The agreement must include a program budget that is acceptable to you, and that is consistent with the eligible activities and requirements. The agreement must require the subgrantee to permit you to inspect your subgrantee's work and to follow applicable OMB and HUD administrative requirements, audit requirements, and cost principles, including those related to procurement, drawdown of funds for immediate use only, and accounting for the use of grant funds and implementation of program activities. In addition, your subgrant must describe the nature of the activities to be undertaken by the subgrantee, the scope of the subgrantee's authority, and [[Page 9764]] the amount of any insurance to be carried by you and the subgrantee to protect your respective interests. (3) You are responsible for monitoring, and for providing technical assistance to, any subgrantee to ensure compliance with applicable HUD and OMB requirements. You must also ensure that subgrantees have appropriate insurance liability coverage. (E) Ineligible Contractors The provisions of 24 CFR part 24 relating to the employment, engagement of services, awarding of contracts or funding of any contractors or subcontractors during any period of debarment, suspension, or placement in ineligibility status apply to this grant. (F) Section 3 Economic Opportunity See Section II(E) of the General Section of the SuperNOFA. The requirements of Section 3 apply to some of the activities that may be funded by this NOFA. (G) Drawdown of Grant Funds You will be required to access your grant funds through HUD's Line of Credit Control System-Voice Response System in accordance with procedures for minimizing the time lapsing between drawdowns and use of funds for eligible purposes as described in 24 CFR parts 84 and/or 85, as applicable. If HUD changes the procedures for the draw of grant funds, HUD will notify you through the issuance of a grant amendment. (H) Reports and Closeout If you receive a grant, you will be required to submit to HUD a semi-annual progress report (Form 269). The narrative of the Form 269 must be sent in a format prescribed by HUD that indicates program expenditures and measures performance in achieving goals. At grant completion, you will be required to participate in a closeout process which shall include a final report in a format prescribed by HUD that reports final program expenditures and measures performance in achieving program goals. Closeout will culminate in a closeout agreement between you and HUD and, when appropriate, in the return of grant funds which have not been expended in accordance with applicable requirements, or which may be remaining after all activities have been completed and paid for. (I) Suspension or Termination of Funding HUD may suspend or terminate funding if you fail to undertake the approved program activities on a timely basis in accordance with your grant agreement, adhere to grant agreement requirements or special conditions, or submit timely and accurate reports. (J) Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing You do not have to address Section II(D) of the General Section of the SuperNOFA. V. Application Selection Process (A) Rating and Ranking (1) HUD will evaluate all eligible applications based on the factors for award identified in this Section V. (2) After the applications have been scored, HUD will rank them on a national basis. An application must receive a score of at least 70 points, excluding the EZ/EC and Dallas bonus points, to be eligible for funding. Awards will be made in ranked order until all funds are expended. (3) In the event of a tie, HUD will select the applicant with the highest score in Rating Factor 1. If Rating Factor 1 is scored identically, the scores in Rating Factors 2, 3 and 4 will be compared in that order, until one of the applications receives a higher score. If both applications still score the same then the application which requests the least funding will be selected to promote the more efficient use of resources. (B) Factors for Award To Evaluate and Rank Applications The maximum number of points for this program is 102 (except for an application submitted by the City of Dallas, Texas which would be eligible for a maximum of 104 points in accordance with Rating Factor 3, paragraph (7), below. This includes two EZ/EC bonus points, as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (20 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have proper organizational resources necessary to successfully implement the proposed New Approach Anti-Drug Program activities in an effective, efficient, and timely manner. In rating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which the application demonstrates the capabilities described below: (1) (5 Points) The applicants' administrative capacity to implement the grant. HUD will award points based on the quality and amount of staff allocated to the grant activity by you; the anticipated effectiveness of your systems for budgeting, procurement, drawdown, allocation, and accounting for grant funds and matching resources in accordance with OMB administrative requirements; and the lines of accountability for implementing your grant activity, coordinating your partnerships, and ensuring that you and your MOU partners' commitments will be met. You must include in your narrative a discussion of financial capacity, staff resources, and prior experience that will enable you to effectively administer the grant and meet reporting requirements. This narrative must not exceed five pages. For an owner of an assisted housing development that is HUD-insured, HUD will consider the most recent Management Review (including Rural Housing Management Review), Housing Quality Standards (HQS) review, State Agency review and such other relevant information available to HUD on the capacity of the owner and manager to undertake the grant; you must include a copy of the most recent management review (not a physical inspection report) for the property to be served by your grant. These documents will not be counted against your 5 page narrative limitation. (2) The applicant's performance in administering Drug Elimination grants and/or other Federal, state or local grants of similar size and complexity during the last 3 years. In assessing this factor, HUD will verify you and your partners' successful experience and performance based on information on file with the Department and will consider the following factors with the indicated total available points: (a) (5 Points) Your successful experience combined with your MOU partners' successful experience in utilizing similar strategies to alleviate crime. You must identify your participation in HUD grant programs within the last three years and discuss the degree of your success in implementing planned activities; achieving program goals and objectives; timely drawdown of funds; timely submission of required reports and ability to complete activities on time and within budget; what if any audit findings were noted; whether there was audit compliance; whether there are and the extent of any unresolved findings and/or outstanding recommendations from prior HUD reviews or audits undertaken by HUD, HUD-Office of Inspector General, the General Accounting Office (GAO) or independent public accountants (IPAs). To receive maximum points under this section, you must have worked in partnership with one or more of your MOU partners (or two or more of your [[Page 9765]] MOU partners may have worked together in partnership) using similar strategies to reduce crime in and around assisted housing developments. To demonstrate success in implementing past projects, you must identify the reduction in the occurrence of the types of crime as indicated in Rating Factor 2 of this NOFA. In the absence of previous partnerships, your capacity will weigh more heavily than the experience of any of your partners, in HUD's assignment of points under this subfactor. (b) (4 Points) Your performance in administering other Federal, State or local grant programs. You must identify your participation in HUD grant programs within the preceding three years, and discuss the degree of your success in implementing and managing (program implementation, timely drawdown of funds, timely submission of required drawdown of funds, timely submission of required reports with satisfactory outcomes related to the plan and timetable, audit compliance and other HUD reviews) these grant programs. (3) (6 Points) The strength of the applicants' partnership as it relates to eliminating the crime problem identified in Rating Factor 2. HUD will award points in this area based on the strength of resource commitments identified in your MOUs in terms of the amount of staff, time, money, or other assets committed by each MOU party toward implementing your program. Your description should identify what skill each party will bring to help successfully implement your program, and the firmness of the commitments); evidence of your MOU partners' (and project tenants') pre-application role in developing the plan and prospective role in program implementation; indications of the capacity of the assisted housing developments' ownership and management (based on available management reviews by governing public entities) to undertake their share of responsibilities in the partnership (including evidence of whether management carefully screens applicants for units and takes appropriate steps to deal with tenants known to exhibit or suspected of exhibiting criminal behavior) and to cooperate with law enforcement actions on their project premises; the willingness of the unit of general local government to use its prosecutor's office as its lead agency in implementing the grant; participation of additional partners other than those required to sign MOUs (for example, neighborhood business organizations); and the effectiveness of the partnership structure. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (25 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for funding your proposed program activities to address the documented degree of the severity of the drug-related crime problem in the project area proposed for funding. In responding to this factor, HUD will evaluate the extent to which you have explained a critical level of need for your proposed activities and have indicated the urgency of meeting the need in the target area. You must include a description of the extent and nature of drug-related crime ``in and around'' the housing units or developments proposed for funding. You will be evaluated on the following: (1) (15 points) ``Objective Crime Data'' relevant to the target area. To the extent that you can provide objective crime data specific to the community or targeted development proposed for funding, your application will be awarded up to 15 points. Your application must include the most current and specific Part I Crime data and relevant Part II Crime data available from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR) system or the local law enforcement's crime statistics. Part I Crimes include: homicide; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; burglary; larceny; auto theft; and arson. Part II drug-related crimes include: drug abuse violations; simple assault; vandalism; weapons violations; and other crimes which you are proposing to be targeted as part of your grant. In assessing this subfactor, HUD will consider the extent of specificity that the statistical data is provided (e.g., data specific to the neighborhood covered by your application). These data must consist of verifiable records and not anecdotal reports. Where appropriate, the statistics should be reported both in real numbers and as an annual percentage of the residents in each development (e.g., 20 arrests in a two-year period for distribution of heroin in a development with 100 residents reflects a 20% occurrence rate). These data may include: (a) Police records or other verifiable information from records on the types or sources of drug related crime in your targeted developments and surrounding area; (b) The number of lease terminations or evictions for drug-related crime at your targeted developments; and (c) The number of emergency room admissions for drug use or that result from drug-related crime. Such information may be obtained from police departments and/or fire departments, emergency medical service agencies and hospitals. The number of police calls for service from housing authority developments that include resident initiated calls, officer-initiated calls, domestic violence calls, drug distribution complaints, found drug paraphernalia, gang activity, graffiti that reflects drugs or gang-related activity, vandalism, drug arrests, and abandoned vehicles. For PHAs, such data should include housing authority police records on the types and sources of drug related crime ``in and around'' developments as reflected in crime statistics or other supporting data from Federal, State, Tribal or local law enforcement agencies. (2) (10 Points) Other Crime Data: Other supporting data on the extent of drug-related crime. For this element, you can receive up to 10 points. To the extent that objective data as described above may not be available, or to complement that data, your assessment must use data from other verifiable sources that have a direct bearing on drug- related crime in the developments proposed for assistance under this program. If you are using other relevant information in place of objective data, however, your application must indicate the reasons why you could not obtain objective data and what efforts you made to obtain it and what efforts you will make during the grant period to begin obtaining the data. Examples of the data should include (but are not necessarily limited to): (a) Surveys of residents and staff in your targeted developments surveyed on drug-related crime or on-site reviews to determine drug/ crime activity; and government or scholarly studies or other research in the past year that analyze drug-related crime activity in the targeted developments. (b) Vandalism cost at your targeted developments, including elevator vandalism (where appropriate) and other vandalism attributable to drug-related crime. (c) Information from schools, health service providers, residents and Federal, State, local, and Tribal officials, and the verifiable opinions and observations of individuals having direct knowledge of drug-related crime and the nature and frequency of these problems in developments proposed for assistance. (These individuals may include Federal, State, Tribal, and local government law enforcement officials, resident or community leaders, school officials, community medical officials, substance abuse, treatment (dependency/ [[Page 9766]] remission) or counseling professionals, or other social service providers.) (d) The school dropout rate and level of absenteeism for youth that you can relate to drug-related crime. If crime or other statistics are not available at the development or precinct level, you must use other verifiable, reliable and objective data. (e) To the extent that the community's Consolidated Plan identifies the level of the problem and the urgency in meeting the need, references to the Consolidated Plan should be included in your response. The Department will review more favorably those applicants who used the Consolidated Plan to identify need, when applicable. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (Quality of the Plan) (35 Points) This factor addresses the quality and anticipated effectiveness of your proposed action plan in taking a comprehensive community-based approach toward the problem of drugs and drug-related crime in the neighborhood identified in your application. Your application must include an action plan for crime reduction and elimination efforts, describing in detail: the specific activities to be under taken; the parties responsible for or involved in the activities for each development proposed for assistance; and the dollar amount and extent of resources committed to each activity or service proposed. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the following: (1) (25 Points) The quality, comprehensiveness of your action plan to address the drug-related crime problem, and the problems associated with drug-related crime in the developments proposed for funding, including its anticipated effectiveness in reducing or eliminating drug-related crime problems immediately and over an extended period, as evidenced by: (a) The extent to which your proposed activities provide services over the existing baseline of services currently provided to the project area; (b) The extent of the commitment of the partners, as described and documented in the MOU in implementing your plan. HUD will evaluate the extent to which the activities are comprehensive and result of collective actions that effectively work together. If you provide for a comprehensive approach, you will receive a higher number of rating points. HUD will provide no points under this subfactor if your application does not include an MOU with the local law enforcement entity with jurisdiction over the neighborhood identified in your application; (c) The extent to which you have partnered with appropriate neighborhood and community stakeholders; (d) The extent to which the resources allocated and the budget proposed are adequate to conduct the work plan as proposed; and (e) Your rationale for the proposed activities and methods and why you believe the activities will be effective in reducing drug use and drug-related crime. If you are proposing new methods for which there is limited knowledge of the effectiveness, you should provide the basis for modifying past practices and rationale for why you believe the modification will yield more effective results. (2) (10 Points) The adequacy of the process you will use to collect, maintain, analyze and report Part I and II crimes as defined by the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR System), as well as police workload data. The process must include the collection of police workload data such as, but not limited to, all calls for service at the housing authority by individual development, patterns over a period of time, type of crime, and plans to improve data collection and reporting. Your proposed analysis of the data collected should include a method for assessing the impact of grant activities on the collected crime statistics on an on-going basis during the award period. (3) Up to two (2) additional points will be awarded to any application submitted by the City of Dallas, Texas, to the extent this subfactor is addressed. Due to an order of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas, Dallas Division, with respect to any application submitted by the City of Dallas, Texas, HUD's consideration of this subfactor will consider the extent to which the applicant's plan for the use of New Approach Anti-Drug funds will be used to eradicate the vestiges of racial segregation in the Dallas Housing Authority's programs consistent with the Court's order. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (Support of Residents, the Local Government and the Community in Planning and Implementing the Proposed Activities and Interagency Activities) (10 Points) This factor addresses your ability to secure community and government resources, in-kind services from local governments, non- profit entities, including resident organizations, for-profit entities, or private organizations to be combined with HUD's program resources to achieve program purposes. To be considered as documented evidence of leveraging, you must submit a letter signed by the organization head authorized to commit the organization which details the amount of funds or type of services to be provided. The letter also must identify the dollar value of any services or goods in lieu of a cash contribution. Therefore, in responding to the factor you must equate the time or services provided into a dollar value. This dollar value will be added to any cash funding commitments identified as part of your leveraging of funds. For example, if you are receiving a donation of security alarm systems, you should indicate the number of security systems to be provided and give a dollar value for those alarm systems. The value will be added to any cash contributions you have noted from others. The letter may indicate that the commitment is predicated on the applicant receiving the grant from HUD. In assessing this factor, HUD will consider the following: (1) Evidence of the extent and amount of the commitment of funding, staff, or in-kind resources, partnership agreements, and on-going or planned cooperative efforts with law enforcement agencies, memoranda of understanding, or agreements to participate. Such commitments must be signed by an official of the organization legally able to make commitments for the organization. This evidence of commitment must include organization name, resources, and responsibilities of each participant. This also includes interagency activities already undertaken, participation in local, state, Tribal or Federal anti-drug related crime efforts such as: education, training and employment provision components of Welfare Reform efforts, Operation Weed and Seed, Operation Safe Home, local law enforcement initiatives and/or successful coordination of its law enforcement, or other activities with local, state, Tribal or Federal law enforcement agencies. (2) HUD may award more points for applications with a higher percentage of these resources as compared to Anti-Drug New Approach funds requested. Rating Factor 5: Comprehensiveness and Coordination (10 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have coordinated your activities with other known organizations, participants or have promoted participation in a community's Consolidated Planning process, and are working towards addressing a need in a holistic and comprehensive manner through [[Page 9767]] linkages with other activities in the community. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which: (1) You have coordinated your proposed activities with those of other groups or organizations prior to submission in order to best complement, support and coordinate all known activities and if funded, the specific steps you will take to share information on solutions and outcomes with others. Any written agreements, memoranda of understanding in place, or that will be in place after award should be described. (2) You have taken or will take specific steps to become active in the community's Consolidated Planning process (including the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice) established to identify and address a need/problem that is related to the activities the applicant proposes. (3) You have shared and coordinated information on solutions and outcomes with other law-enforcement and governmental agencies, and a description of any written agreements in place or that will be put in place. (4) You have taken or will take specific steps to develop linkages to coordinate comprehensive solutions through meetings, information networks, planning processes or other mechanisms with: (a) Other HUD-funded project/activities outside the scope of those covered by the Consolidated Plan; and (b) Other Federal, State, or locally funded activities, including those proposed or on-going in the community. VI. Application Submission Requirements Each New Approach Anti-Drug application must conform to the requirements of the applicable application kit, both in format and content. Each New Approach Anti-Drug application must provide the following items in addition to the submission requirements listed in Section VI of this program section of the SuperNOFA: (A) Application Cover Letter; (B) Congressional Summary--Summary of your proposed program activities in five (5) sentences or less: (C) A neighborhood description. The neighborhood description must include a basic description (e.g., boundaries and size), population, number of housing units in the neighborhood, a map, a population profile (e.g., relevant census data on the socio-economic, ethnic and family makeup of neighborhood residents), and the basis on which the area meets the definition of ``neighborhood'' as described in this notice (i.e., describe and include a copy of the comprehensive plan, ordinance or other official local document which defines the area as a neighborhood, village, or similar geographical designation). If the entire jurisdiction is defined as a neighborhood by virtue of having a population at less than 25,000, indicate the jurisdiction's population under the 1990 census and describe/include more recent information which gives the best indication as to the current population. (D) The description of the assisted housing development(s) in the neighborhood. This must include the name of the project; the name of the project owner; the nature, sources, and program titles of all project-based subsidies or other assistance provided to the project by units of government or private nonprofit entities (any names of public or nonprofit programs other than programs sponsored by HUD should be accompanied by a description of the program and the name and business phone number of a contact person responsible for administering the program for the subsidy provider); the number of housing units in the project; and the number of housing units in the project that meet the definition of ``assisted housing units'' in this notice, and a description of the restrictions on rents and resident incomes that, in combination with the subsidy provided to the project, qualify the units as assisted/affordable in accordance with the definition in this NOFA; and the number, geographic proximity (adjoining, adjacent, or scattered site, and if scattered site, the distance between the two buildings which are furthest apart), and type (single family detached, townhouse, garden, elevator) of buildings in the project. (E) Application for Federal Assistance form (Standard Form SF-424) signed by the chief executive officer of your organization. (F) An action plan which describes the activities and roles to be undertaken by you and each subgrantee or subrecipient of program funds. This action plan may be attached to and referenced in your MOU. (G) Narrative responses to the factors for award including any required documentation identified under each factor. (H) A line item budget which identifies salaries, fringe benefits, consultants or subgrantees, equipment, supplies, travel, and general and administrative expenses; as well as an estimated dollar amount for each activity to be undertaken as part of your action plan. (I) Overall budget and timetable that includes separate budgets, goals, milestones, and timetables for each activity and addresses milestones towards achieving the goals described above; and indicates the contributions and implementation responsibilities of each partner for each activity, goal, and milestone. (J) The number of staff years, the titles and professional qualifications, and respective roles of staff assigned full or part- time to grant implementation by the applicant/grantee. (K) Your plan and lines of accountability (including an organization chart) for implementing your grant activity, coordinating the partnership, and assuring that your and your subgrantees' commitments will be met. There must be a discussion of the various agencies of the unit of government that will participate in grant implementation (which must include the prosecutor's office and at least one, but preferably both, of the following: the police department and an agency dealing with community development), their respective roles (i.e., which has the lead), and their lines of communication. VII. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section of this SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. VIII. Environmental Requirements Prior to the award of grant funds under the program, HUD will perform an environmental review to the extent required under the provisions of 24 CFR part 50. Should the environmental review indicate adverse environmental impacts, your application may be downgraded or rejected. The General Section of this SuperNOFA provides additional guidance on Environmental Reviews. IX. Authority This program is authorized under the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999 (Pub.L. 105-276, approved October 21, 1998), under the heading ``Drug Elimination Grants for Low-Income Housing.'' Appendix A--Office of Public Housing, Field Office Directory New England Region Boston (Hub) Donna Ayala, Deputy Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD-- Massachusetts State Office, Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. Federal Building, 10 Causeway Street, Room 553, Boston, MA 02222-1092, (617) 565-5197, (617) 565-7305 (FAX) [[Page 9768]] Hartford (Program Center) Sonia D. Samuels, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Connecticut State Office, One Corporate Center, 19th Floor, Hartford, CT 06103-3220, (860) 240-4800, (860) 240-4854 (FAX) New York/NJ Region New York (Hub) Mirza Del Rosario, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--New York State Office, 26 Federal Plaza, Suite 32-116, New York, New York 10278-0068, (212) 264-8931, (212) 264-9834 (FAX) Buffalo (Hub) Joan Spilman, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Buffalo State Office, Lafayette Court, 465 Main Street, Fifth Floor, Buffalo, New York 14203-1780, DIRECT NUMBER: (716) 551-5719, (716) 551-5755, (716) 551-4789 (FAX) Newark (Hub) Carmen Valenti, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--New Jersey State Office, One Newark Center, 13th Floor, Newark, NJ 07102-5260, (973) 622-7900, Ext. 3600, (973) 645-2270 (FAX) Mid-Atlantic Region Philadelphia (Hub) Malinda Roberts, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD-- Pennsylvania State Office, The Wanamaker Building, 100 Penn Square East, Philadelphia, PA 19107-3390, (215) 656-0576, ext. 3308, (215) 656-3424 (FAX) Baltimore (Hub) William Tamburrino, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD-- Maryland State Office, City Crescent Building, 10 South Howard Street, 5th Floor, Baltimore, Maryland 21201-2505, (410) 962-2520, ext. 3102, (410) 962-4378 (FAX) Pittsburgh (Hub) Paul LaMarca, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Pittsburgh Area Office, 339 Sixth Avenue, Sixth Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15222- 2515, (412) 644-6571, (412) 644-5486 (FAX) Richmond (Program Center) Pat Anderson, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Virginia State Office, The 3600 Centre, 3600 West Broad Street, P.O. Box 90331, Richmond, VA 23230-0331, (804) 278-4500, X3217, (804) 278-4636 (FAX) Washington, DC (Program Center) Lee Palman, Program Center Coordinator, DHUD--District of Columbia Office, 820 First Street, NE; Suite 450, Washington, DC 20002-4205, (202) 275-7965, ext 3175, (202) 275-6690 (FAX) Southeast Region Atlanta (Hub) Boyce Norris, Deputy Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD-- Georgia State Office, Richard B. Russell Federal Building, 75 Spring Street, SW, Atlanta, GA 30303-3388, (404) 331-4766, (404) 331-1022 (FAX) Birmingham (Hub) Mack Heaton, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Alabama State Office, Beacon Ridge Tower, 600 Beacon Parkway West, #300, Birmingham, AL 35209-4144, (205) 290-7601, ext 1101, (205) 290-7502 (FAX) Columbia (Program Center) Larry Knighter, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--South Carolina State Office, Strom Thurmond Federal Building, 1835 Assembly Street, Columbia, SC 29201-2480, (803) 765- 5831, (803) 765-5515 (FAX), (806) 253-3428 Greensboro (Hub) Ledford Austin, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--North Carolina State Office, Koger Building, 2306 West Meadowview Road, Greensboro, NC 27407-3707, (336) 547-4038, (336) 547-4129 (FAX) Jackson (Program Center) George Smith, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Mississippi State Office, Doctor A.H. McCoy Federal Building, 100 West Capitol Street, Room 910, Jackson, MS 39269-1016, (601) 965-4761, (601) 965-4733 (FAX) Coral Gables (Hub) Karen Cato-Turner, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Florida State Office, Gables I Towers, Suite 501, 1320 South Dixie Highway, Coral Gables, FL 33146-2911, (305) 662-4589, X2270, (305) 662-4537 (FAX) Jacksonville (Hub) John Niesz, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Jacksonville Area Office, Southern Bell Tower, 301 West Bay Street, Suite 2200, Jacksonville, FL 32202-5121, (904) 232-1777, X2142, (904) 232-1721 (FAX) Louisville (Hub) Arthur Wasson, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Kentucky State Office, 601 West Broadway, Post Office Box 1044, Louisville, KY 40201-1044, (502) 582-6163, ext 370, (502) 582-6558 (FAX) Knoxville (Program Center) Sidney McBee, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Knoxville Area Office, John J. Duncan Federal Building, 710 Locust Street, Third Floor, Knoxville, TN 37902-2526, (423) 545- 4402, X4, (423) 545-4558 (FAX) Nashville (Program Center) Karen Gill, Acting Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Tennessee State Office, 251 Cumberland Bend Drive, Suite 200, Nashville, TN 37228-1803, (615) 736-5063, ext. 6132, (615) 736-2385 (FAX) San Juan (Hub) Hildamar Ortiz, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Caribbean Office, Administracion de Terrenos Building, 171 Carlos E. Chardon Avenue, Suite 301, San Juan, PR 00918-0903, (787) 766-5400, X2031, (787) 766-6504 (FAX) Mid-West Region Chicago (Hub) Debra Torres, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Illinois State Office, Ralph H. Metcalf Federal Building, 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, IL 60604-3507, (312) 353-1915, (312) 353-6236, x2302, (312) 886-4060 (FAX) Cleveland (Hub) Thomas Marshall, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Cleveland Area Office, Renaissance Building, 1350 Euclid Avenue, Suite 500, Cleveland, OH 44115-1815, (216) 522-2700, (216) 522-7100 (FAX) Columbus (Program Center) David Kellner, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Ohio State Office, 200 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215- 2499, (614) 469-5787, X8224, (614) 469-5123 (FAX) Detroit (Hub) Joann L. Adams, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Michigan State Office, Patrick V. McNamara Federal Building, 477 Michigan Avenue, Detroit, MI 48226-2592, (313) 226-6880, X8111, (313) 226- 6160 (FAX) Indianapolis (Program Center) Forrest Jones, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Indiana State Office, 151 North Delaware Street, Suite 1200, Indianapolis, IN 46204-2556, (317) 226-6557, (317) 226-5594 (FAX) Milwaukee (Program Center) John Finger, Program Center Coordinator, DHUD--Wisconsin State Office, Henry S. Reuss Federal Plaza, 310 West Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1380, Milwaukee, WI 53203-2289, (414) 297-1029, Ext. 8212, (414) 297-1180 (FAX) Minneapolis (Hub) Daniel Larson, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Minnesota State Office, 220 South Second Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55401- 2195, (612) 370-3135, Ext. 2220, (612) 370-3003 (FAX) Southwest Region Fort Worth (Hub) Eileen Rogers, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Texas State Office, 1600 Throckmorton, Post Office Box 2905, Fort Worth, TX 76113-2905, (817) 978-9325, X3332, (817) 978-9382 (FAX) Albuquerque (Program Center) Dolly A. Clark, Acting Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--New Mexico State Office, 625 Truman Street, N.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87110-6443, (505) 346-7303, ext. 271, (505) 346- 6604 (FAX) Houston (Program Center) Raynold Richardson, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Houston Area Office, Norfolk Tower, 2211 Norfolk, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77098-4096, (713) 313-2274/2280, (713) 313- 2371 (FAX) [[Page 9769]] Little Rock (Hub) Catherine Lamberg, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD-- Arkansas State Office, TCBY Tower, 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 900, Little Rock, AR 72201-3488, (501) 324-5933, (501) 324-5448 (FAX) New Orleans (Hub) Chester Drozdowski, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD-- Louisiana State Office, 501 Magazine Street, Ninth Floor, New Orleans, LA 70130, (504) 589-7235, (504) 589-6177 (FAX) Oklahoma City (Program Center) Robert Vasquez, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Oklahoma State Office, 500 West Main Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73102, (405) 553-7454, (405) 552-7530 (FAX) San Antonio (Hub) Diana Armstrong, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--San Antonio Area Office, Washington Square, 800 Dolorosa Street, San Antonio, TX 78207-4563, (210) 475-6865, (210) 472-6816 (FAX) Great Plains Region Kansas City (Hub) Andrew Boeddeker, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Kansas/ Missouri State Office, Gateway Tower II, 400 State Avenue, Kansas City, KS 66101-2406, (913) 551-5582, (913) 551-6981 (FAX) Omaha (Program Center) Charlie D. Hill, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Nebraska State Office, Executive Tower Centre, 10909 Mill Valley Road, Omaha, NE 68154-3955, (402) 492-3137, (402) 492- 3163 (FAX) St. Louis (Program Center) Patricia Straussner, Program Center Coordinator, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--St. Louis Area Office, Robert A. Young Federal Building, 1222 Spruce Street, St. Louis, MO 63103, (314) 539-6505, (314) 539-6508 (FAX) Rocky Mountain Region Denver (Hub) John Dibella, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Colorado State Office, First Interstate Tower North, 633--17th Street, 12th Floor, Denver, CO 80202-3607, (303) 672-5380, ext 1244, (303) 672- 5065 (FAX) Pacific/Hawaii Region San Francisco (Hub) Joyce Lee, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--California State Office, Phillip Burton Federal Building/Courthouse, 450 Golden Gate Avenue, Ninth Floor, San Francisco, CA 94102-3448, (415) 436- 8375, (415) 436-6440 (FAX) Los Angeles (Hub) Bob Cook, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Los Angeles Area Office, AT&T Center, 611 West 6th Street, Suite 800, Los Angeles, CA 90017-3127, (213) 894-8000, ext 3500, (213) 894-8125 (FAX) NW/Alaska Region Seattle (Hub) Lynn Martin, Director, Office of Public Housing, DHUD--Washington State Office, Seattle Federal Office Building, 909--1st Avenue, Suite 360, Seattle, WA 98104-1000, (206) 220-5290, Ext 3694, (206) 220-5255 (FAX) Portland (Program Center) Elizabeth Santone, Program Center Coordinator, DHUD--Oregon State Office, 400 Southwest Sixth Avenue, Suite 700, Portland, OR 97204- 1596, (503) 326-2619, (503) 326-4065 (FAX) BILLING CODE 4210-32-P [[Page 9771]] [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN26FE99.032 BILLING CODE 4210-32-C [[Page 9773]] Funding Availability for Public and Indian Housing Drug Elimination Technical Assistance Program Program Overview Purpose of the Program. The purpose of the Public and Indian Housing Drug Elimination Technical Assistance Program (PHDE-TA) is to provide no more than 30 billable days of technical assistance (TA) consultant services to assist public housing agencies (PHAs), Indian tribes and Tribally Designated Housing Entities (TDHEs), Resident Management Corporations (RMCs), incorporated Resident Councils (RCs), and Resident Organizations (ROs) in responding immediately to drug and drug-related crime in public and Tribal housing communities. The TA services may be conducted over a period of not more than 90 days. Available Funds. Approximately $2 million (which includes Fiscal Year 1997 carryover) is available for funding short-term technical assistance. Eligible Applicants. Public Housing Authorities (PHAs), Indian tribes and Tribally Designated Housing Entities (TDHEs); incorporated Resident Management Corporations (RMCs), incorporated Resident Councils (RCs), and Resident Organizations (ROs). Application Deadline. June 16, 1999. Match. None. Additional Information If you are interested in applying for Public Housing Drug Elimination Technical Assistance funding, please review carefully the General Section of this SuperNOFA and the following additional information. I. Application Due Date, Application Kits, Further Information, and Technical Assistance Application Due Date. Submit one original application and one copy to the Community Safety and Conservation Division (CSCD), Room 4206 at the HUD Headquarters Building located at 451 Seventh Street, SW, Washington, DC, 20410, on or before 12:00 midnight on June 16, 1999. The only exception to this deadline is for HUD-Initiated Public Housing Drug Elimination Technical Assistance, for which there is no application deadline. See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for specific procedures governing the form of application submission (e.g., mail applications, express mail, overnight delivery, or hand-carried). Submit a copy of your application to the appropriate HUD Field Office or HUB with delegated public housing responsibilities for your organization. See Appendix I for a list of HUD offices with delegated responsibilities. You may also call the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD-8929 if you have a question regarding where you should submit your application (persons with hearing or speech impairments may call the Center's TTY number at 1-800-843-2209). You must submit with your application(s) to CSCD, a Confirmation Form documenting that the appropriate HUD Field Office or HUB received your TA application (this form is a threshold requirement). HUD will review PHDE-TA applications on a continuing basis until June 15, 1999, or until funds available under this program are expended. Due to the reduced availability of funds in FY 1999, HUD encourages you to submit early. For Application Kits. For an application kit and any supplemental information, please call the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD- 8929. Persons with hearing or speech impairments may call the Center's TTY number at 1-800-843-2209. When requesting an application kit, please refer to the Public Housing Drug Elimination Technical Assistance Program, and provide your name, address (including zip code) and telephone number (including area code). An application kit is also available on the Internet through the HUD web site at http:// www.hud.gov. For Further Information and Technical Assistance. For answers to your questions please call the local HUD Field Office or HUB where you will be submitting your application or you may call the Public Housing Drug Elimination TA Support Center at the 1-800-578-3472. II. Amount Allocated For FY 1999, approximately $2 million is available for Public Housing Drug Elimination Technical Assistance. III. Program Description; Eligible Applicants; Eligible Activities (A) Program Description (1) The purpose of this program is to provide not more than 30 billable days of technical assistance (TA) consultant services to assist public housing agencies (PHAs), Indian tribes and Tribally Designated Housing Entities (TDHEs), Resident Management Corporations (RMCs), incorporated Resident Councils (RCs) and Resident Organizations (ROs) in responding immediately to drug and drug-related crime in public and Tribal housing communities. The TA services may be conducted over a period not to exceed 90 days. Housing Authorities are encouraged to use this program as a tool to evaluate and monitor the Public Housing Drug Elimination Program grants. (2) HUD may also initiate TA under this program. HUD initiated TA does not require an application but is also short term assistance. (3) The program will fund the use of consultants who can provide the necessary consultation and/or training for the types of activities outlined below. HUD will fund the use of consultants to assist the applicant undertaking tasks including preparing a proposed strategic or long-range plan for reducing drugs and drug-related crime, or conducting a needs assessment or comprehensive crime survey. The PHDE- TA program also funds efforts in: (a) Assessing, quantifying and establishing performance measurement systems (including gathering baseline statistics) relating to drug and drug-related crime problems in public or Tribal housing development(s) and surrounding community(ies); (b) Training for housing authority staff and residents in anti- crime and anti-drug prevention practices and programs; (c) Evaluating current anti-crime and anti-drug-related crime programs. (d) Designing and identifying appropriate anti-crime and anti-drug- related practices and programs in the following areas: (i) Law enforcement strategies, including negotiating with the local police, working with Federal law enforcement, Operation Safe Home, Weed and Seed, and other Federal anti-crime efforts; (ii) Crime data collection for establishing baseline performance measurements; (iii) Youth leadership development; youth anti-gang, anti-violence, anti-drug initiatives; youth peer mediation and conflict resolution to deal directly with anger/violence to prevent future violent episodes; (iv) Resident patrols; and (v) Security and physical design. (B) Eligible Applicants PHAs, Indian tribes and TDHEs, RCs, ROs in the case of Indian tribes and TDHEs, and RMCs are eligible to receive short-term technical assistance services under this PHDE-TA Program. Specific eligibility requirements are: (1) If you are an RC or RO, you must be an incorporated nonprofit organization or association that meets all seven of the following requirements: (a) You must be representative of the residents you purport to represent. (b) You may represent residents in more than one development or in all of [[Page 9774]] the developments of a PHA or Indian tribe or TDHE, but you must fairly represent residents from each development that you represent. (c) You must adopt written procedures providing for the election of specific officers on a regular basis, but at least once every 3 years. (d) You must have a democratically elected governing board. The voting membership of your board must consist of residents of the development or developments that you represent. (e) You must be supported in your application by a PHA or an Indian tribe or TDHE. (f) You must provide evidence of incorporation. (g) You must provide evidence of adopted written procedures for electing officers. (2) If you are an RMC, you must be an entity that proposes to enter into, or that enters into, a management contract with a PHA under 24 CFR part 964, or a management contract with an Indian tribe or TDHE. You must have all seven of the following characteristics: (a) You must be a nonprofit organization incorporated under the laws of the State or Indian tribe where you are located. (b) You may be established by more than one RO or RC, so long as each: approves the establishment of your corporation; and has representation on the Board of Directors of your corporation. (c) You must have an elected Board of Directors. (d) Your by-laws must require the Board of Directors to include representatives of each RO or RC involved in establishing the corporation. (e) Your voting members must be residents of the development or developments you manage. (f) You must be approved by the RC. If there is no council, a majority of the households of the development must approve the establishment of your organization to determine the feasibility of establishing a corporation to manage the development. (g) You may serve as both the RMC and the RC, so long as your corporation meets the requirements of 24 CFR part 964 for a RC. (In the case of a RMC for an Indian tribe or TDHE, you may serve as both the RMC and the RO, so long as your corporation meets the requirements of this program for a RO.) (3) You can only submit one application per award period. A PHA and its eligible resident groups, and an Indian tribe and its TDHE may apply during the same award period as long as there is no conflict or overlap in your proposed activities. You are eligible to apply to receive technical assistance even if you are already receiving technical assistance under this program, as long as your request creates no scheduling conflict with other PHDE-TA requests. If HUD Initiates TA with your organization, you may not receive more than one type of technical assistance concurrently unless HUD, in consultation with your organization, determines that the TA will not negatively affect the quality of the PHDE-TA. (4) You are eligible to apply to receive technical assistance whether or not you are already receiving drug elimination funds under the Public and Indian Housing Drug Elimination Program. (5) You must comply with the laws, regulations, and Executive Orders applicable to the Drug Elimination TA Program, including applicable civil rights laws. (C) Eligible Activities (1) Funding is limited to technical assistance for carrying out activities authorized under Chapter 2, Subtitle C, Title V of the Anti- Drug Abuse Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 11901 et. seq.), as amended by section 581 of the National Affordable Housing Act of 1990 (Pub.L. 101- 625, approved November 28, 1990) (NAHA), and section 161 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (Pub.L. 102-550, approved October 28, 1992) (HCDA 1992). (2) The following circumstances are eligible for HUD-Initiated Technical Assistance under the Public and Indian Housing Drug Elimination Technical Assistance Program. Eligible parties may receive technical assistance initiated and approved by HUD due to drug- and/or crime-related circumstances that require immediate attention. HUD- Initiated technical assistance may be requested by HUD staff for one or more of the following circumstances: (a) Housing authorities, Indian tribes, TDHEs, RCs, ROs, and RMCs that applied, but did not receive a Public Housing Drug Elimination Program Grant; (b) Housing authorities, Indian tribes, TDHEs, RCs, ROs, and RMCs that are unable to document their drug and/or crime problems through crime statistics; (c) Housing authorities, Indian tribes, TDHEs, RCs, ROs, and RMCs that do not have the expertise to develop effective drug and crime prevention programs; (d) Housing authorities, Indian tribes, TDHEs, RCs, ROs, and RMCs that have difficulty developing and/or maintaining partnerships within the community; (e) Housing authorities, Indian tribes, TDHEs, RCs, ROs, and RMCs that have difficulty developing and/or fostering a sense of partnership regarding drug- and/or crime-related problems with residents; (f) Housing authorities, Indian tribes, TDHEs, RCs, ROs, and RMCs that need assistance in developing evaluation mechanisms for drug elimination programs and strategies to include ``One Strike and You're Out'' and the Public Housing Drug Elimination Program; and (g) Housing authorities, Indian tribes, TDHEs, RCs, ROs, and RMCs with special circumstances whose needs fit under the scope of this program section of the SuperNOFA. (4) Ineligible Activities. Funding is not permitted for: (a) Any type of monetary compensation for residents. (b) Any activity that is funded under any other HUD program, including TA and training for the incorporation of RCs or RMCs, and other management activities. (c) Any type of resident training that does not relate to or result in crime and drug reduction or elimination. (d) Salary or fees to your staff, or your former staff within a year of their employment. (e) Underwriting conferences. (f) Conference speakers. (g) Program implementation, proposal writing, financial support for existing programs, or efforts requiring more than 30 billable days of technical assistance over a 90 day period or assistance that will require more than 90 days to complete; the purchase of hardware or equipment, or any activities deemed ineligible in the Drug Elimination Program, excluding consultant's fees. IV. Program Requirements Except as stated below in this section, you must meet the requirements listed in Section II of the General Section of this SuperNOFA. You must also meet these additional requirements: (A) Individual Award Amounts. You may not submit an application for more than $15,000. (1) Applications for short-term technical assistance may be funded up to $15,000, with HUD providing payment directly to your authorized consultant for the consultant's fee, travel, room and board, and other approved costs at the government rate approved by HUD. (2) Technical assistance initiated by HUD may be for any amount up to $25,000 when HUD staff determine that more than 30 billable days of technical assistance over a 90-day period is justified. (B) Receipt of More than One Application. If HUD receives more than [[Page 9775]] one application from a HA, or a group of RCs, ROs, or RMCs, or an Indian tribe and a TDHE, in proximity to one another, HUD may exercise discretion to consider any two or more applications as one, recommending one or more consultants and executing contracts for any combination of applications. (C) Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing. Section II.(D) of the General Section does not apply to this technical assistance program. (D) Eligible Consultants. HUD is seeking individuals or entities who have experience working with public or Tribal housing or other low- income populations to provide short-term technical assistance under this PHDE-TA Program section of the SuperNOFA. Consultants who have previously been deemed eligible and are part of HUD's TA Consultant Database need not reapply, but are encouraged to update their file with more recent experience and rate justification. (1) To qualify as an eligible consultant, you should have experience in one or more of the following general areas: (a) PHA/Indian tribe or TDHE-related experience with: agency organization and management; facility operations; program development; and experience working with residents and community organizations. (b) Anti-crime and anti-drug-related experience with: prevention/ intervention programs; and enforcement strategies. (c) Experience as an independent consultant, or as a consultant working with a firm with related experience and understanding of on- site work requirements, contractual, reporting and billing requirements. (2) HUD is especially interested in encouraging TA consultant applications from persons who are qualified and have extensive experience planning, implementing, and/or evaluating the following professional areas: (a) Lease, screening and grievance procedures; (b) Defensible space, security and environmental design; (c) Parenting, peer support groups and youth leadership; (d) Career planning, job training, tutoring and entrepreneurship; (e) Community policing, neighborhood watch and anti-gang work; (f) Strengthening resident organizing, involvement, and relations with management; and (g) ``One Strike You're Out'' programs. (3) Additional requirements for consultants include the following: (a) In addition to the conflict of interest requirements in 24 CFR part 85, no person who is an employee, agent, officer, or appointed official of an eligible applicant may be funded as a consultant to that organization by this Drug Elimination Technical Assistance Program. (b) If you are a consultant who wishes to provide drug elimination technical assistance services through this program, you must not have had any involvement in the preparation or submission of any PHDE-TA proposal. Your involvement will be considered a conflict of interest, making you ineligible for providing consulting services to the eligible applicant and will disqualify you from future consideration. This prohibition shall also be invoked for preparing and distributing prepared generic or sample applications to entities eligible to apply for funding under this program. If HUD determines that any application submitted by a PHA, Indian tribe or TDHE, RC, RO or RMC duplicates a sufficient amount of any prepared sample to raise issues of possible conflict of interest, and HUD determines you provided and distributed the sample, you will be disqualified from receiving HUD funds. (4) HUD-registered consultants are eligible to receive funds to be reimbursed for up to $15,000 for conducting short-term technical assistance. Long-term results are expected from each job. After your work is completed, evaluations from recipients of the technical assistance services will be submitted to HUD on your work performance. The evaluations will be carefully reviewed to make sure the recipients of TA are satisfied with your services. If your performance receives a satisfactory rating, you will be reimbursed by HUD. In extreme cases of technical assistance needs, staff members of HUD Headquarters and field offices may recommend specialized technical assistance for which you can receive up to $25,000 in funds. (E) Ineligible Consultants. Consultants and/or companies currently debarred or suspended by HUD are not eligible to perform services under this program. Also, consultants that are not in the official Consultant database are considered ineligible for this program. (F) Application Process for Consultants. (1) If you are an individual or entity interested in being listed in the PHDE-TA Consultant Database, you must prepare your application and send it to the address specified in the application kit. Before you can be entered into the Consultant Database, you must submit an application that includes the following information: (a) The Consultant Resource Inventory Questionnaire, including at least three written references, all related to the general areas listed in this PHDE-TA Program section of the SuperNOFA. One or two of the written references must relate to work for a PHA, Indian tribe or TDHE, RC, RO or RMC; (b) A resume; (c) Documented evidence of the standard daily fee previously paid to you for technical assistance services similar to eligible activities under this PHDE-TA Program. If you can justify up to the equivalent of ES-IV, or $462.00 per day, your evidence must include an accountant's statement, W-2 Wage Statements, or payment statements, supplemented with a signed statement or other evidence from the employer of days worked in the course of the particular project (for a payment statement) or the tax year (for a W-2 Statement). (2) You may not have any more than two contracts or purchase orders at one time nor be involved with more than one company at a time that has active Technical Assistance contracts. If you are working as a member of a multi-person firm, the key individual for the specific contract must be listed on each contract as the point of contact. The point of contact must be on-site more hours than any other contracted staff billing to the purchase order, and that individual may have no more than two purchase orders active at the same time. (3) HUD will determine your specific fee based upon the evidence you submitted under this PHDE-TA Program. (4) If you are an employee of a housing agency (HA), Indian tribe, or TDHE, you may not serve as a consultant to your employer. If you serve as a consultant to other than your employer, you must be on annual leave to receive the consultant fee. (5)(i) Consultants may not be requested by name from HUD's database. (ii) Consultants will be recommended to an organization seeking TA, based on factors including previous experience, reasonableness of the fee, and geographic proximity to the site where TA will be provided. Section V of this PHDE-TA section of this SuperNOFA explains this further. V. Application Selection Process (A) General HUD will review applications on a continuing first-come, first- served basis, until funds under this PHDE-TA section of the SuperNOFA are no longer available. Eligible applications will be [[Page 9776]] funded in the order in which negotiations for a statement of work are completed. HUD-Initiated applications will be received throughout the year with no deadline or until funds are expended. (B) Threshold Requirements for Funding Consideration If you are requesting TA services, you must meet the following requirements: (1) Your application must not request an ineligible activity. You cannot request PHDE-TA by answering ``to conduct a needs assessment or survey.'' You must be able to answer the questions below and discuss what prevents you from identifying, describing, and/or measuring the problems. (a) What is the nature of the drug-related crime problem in your community in terms of the extent of crime, the types of crime, and the types of drugs being used? You should include quantifiable or qualitative data on drug problems or criminal activity. (b) What problem(s) do you need technical assistance to address, how do you plan to address them, and how will you know the technical assistance provided was successful in addressing the problem(s)? (c) What types of partnerships currently exist between your organization and other organizations in or within the community (i.e., the police, social service organizations, universities, the YMCA/YWCA, etc.)? (d) How will PHDE-TA be used to improve those relationships? (e) What specific output, outcome, results, or deliverables do you expect from the consultant, including improved coordination or partnership arrangements within your community? (f) What steps are you and your organization currently taking to measure, understand or address the drug-related crime problem in your development or housing authority? (g) How will the proposed assistance allow you to develop an anti- drug, anti-crime strategy; or how will the proposed assistance fit into your current strategy? (2) The application must include the form, ``HUD Field Office/AONAP Confirmation Form.'' (3) If your application does not meet the requirements described above it will not be considered for funding. (C) Application Awards (1) If your application is deemed eligible for funding and sufficient funds are available, you will be contacted by HUD or its agent to confirm the work requirements. (2) Only one application will be accepted from a HA, Indian tribe or TDHE; or group of RCs, ROs or RMCs in proximity to one another. HUD may exercise its discretion to consider any two or more applications as one, assuming that the applications are received at the same time, or before approval by the Office of Finance and Accounting and the Office of Procurement and Contracts, executing the contract, and providing notification to the consultant to proceed to work. (3) Once your application for TA has been reviewed and found acceptable by HUD, the TA Consultant Database will be searched for consultants who have: (a) A principal place of business or residence located within the same geographic area as the applicant. For purposes of this program section of the SuperNOFA, the term ``geographic area'' refers to, in order of priority: city, state, region, and country; (b) The requisite knowledge, skills, and abilities to respond to the request and in address the identified needs; and (c) The most reasonable (least expensive) fees. (4) HUD will then forward to you a list of suggested consultants from the consultant data base. From this list, you must select a consultant to provide your requested TA. (5)(a) From the list provided by HUD, you must contact three TA consultants. HUD may request confirmation from each contacted consultant that they were contacted. If HUD determines that any consultant was not contacted, HUD may consider your selection by the applicant void, and can choose a consultant for you. (b) After contacting each consultant, you must send a written justification for your recommended selection in order preference. If any are unacceptable, you must also indicate the consultant and the reasons you find them unacceptable. (c) If you find that all referred consultants lack the requisite expertise, you must provide written detailed documentation justifying this decision. If HUD determines that your justification is adequate, you will be provided with a second list of potential consultants. (d) If you do not provide HUD the written justification of consultant choice within 30 calendar days, HUD reserves the right to cancel your TA request. (6)(a) HUD or its agent will work with your selected consultant and you to develop a ``statement of work.'' The statement of work should include: (i) A time line and estimated budget; (ii) A discussion of the kind of technical assistance and skills needed to address the problem, and how the technical assistance requested will address these needs; and (iii) A description of the current crime and drug elimination strategy, and how the requested technical assistance will assist that strategy. If the applicant does not currently have a strategy, there should be a statement of how the technical assistance will help them develop a crime and drug elimination strategy. (b)(i) When HUD has completed the authorization to begin work, your selected consultant will be contacted to start work. Your consultant must receive written authorization from HUD or its authorized agent before beginning to provide technical assistance. The requesting organization and the relevant Field Office or Area Office of Office of Native American Programs will also be notified that authorization to begin work has been given. (ii) Work begun before the authorized date will be considered unauthorized and will not be compensated by HUD. (iii) Consultants will only be reimbursed for a maximum of 30 days of work, which must be completed in fewer than 90 days from the date of the approved statement of work. The exception to this will be for HUD- Initiated technical assistance. VI. Application Submission Requirements (A) General In addition to the program requirements listed in the General Section of this SuperNOFA, each TA application must conform to the requirements of the Public and Indian Housing Drug Elimination Technical Assistance Application Kit, both in format and content. A PHDE-TA application must include both the descriptive letter (or form provided in the application kit) and certification statement (or form provided in the application kit) to be eligible for funding. (B) Forms, Certifications and Assurances In addition to the forms, certifications and assurances listed in Section IV of the General Section of the SuperNOFA, the following must be complied with: (1) Applications must be signed and certified by both the Executive Director or Tribal Council or authorized TDHE official and a resident leader. (2) The certification must indicate that: (a) A copy of the application was sent to the local HUD Field Office, Director of Public Housing Division, or Administrator, Office of Native American Programs; (b) The application was reviewed by both the housing authority Executive [[Page 9777]] Director or Tribal Council or authorized TDHE official, and a resident leader of your organization; and (c) Any technical assistance received will be used in compliance with all requirements in the SuperNOFA. (3) The application must contain a four page (or fewer) application letter responding to each of the requirements listed in Section V(B) of the PHDE-TA Program section of the SuperNOFA. VII. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. VIII. Environmental Requirements In accordance with 24 CFR 50.19(b)(9), the assistance provided under this program relates only to the provision of technical assistance and therefore is categorically excluded from the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act and is not subject to environmental review under the related laws and authorities. This determination is based on the ineligibility of real property acquisition, construction, rehabilitation, conversion, leasing, or repair for HUD assistance under this program. IX. Authority The FY 1999 HUD Appropriations Act under the heading, ``Drug Elimination Grants for Low-Income Housing (Including Transfer of Funds).'' BILLING CODE 4210-32-P [[Page 9779]] [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN26FE99.033 BILLING CODE 4210-32-C [[Page 9781]] Funding Availability for Drug Elimination Grants for Federally Assisted Low-Income Housing (Multifamily Housing Drug Elimination) Program Overview Purpose of the Program. The purpose of this Multifamily Housing Drug Elimination Grant Program is to enable owners of federally assisted low-income housing developments to deal effectively with drug- related criminal activity in and around their developments, through a plan of activities including enhanced security measures, and drug-abuse prevention, intervention, referral, and treatment programs. Available Funds. Approximately $16.25 million. Eligible Applicants. Only owners of eligible developments may apply for and become the recipient of grant funds. Property management companies may administer grant programs, but are not eligible applicants. Application Deadline. June 16, 1999. Match. None. Additional Information If you are interested in applying for funding under this program, please review carefully the General Section of this SuperNOFA and the following additional information. I. Application Due Date, Application Kits, Further Information, and Technical Assistance Application Due Date. Your completed application (an original and two copies) is due on or before 6:00 pm local time in the HUD Field Office with jurisdiction over your development on June 16, 1999. See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for specific procedures concerning the form of application submission (e.g., mailed applications, express mail, overnight delivery, or hand carried). Address for Submitting Applications. The Appendix contains a list of HUD Field Offices where you must send your application by the deadline. Please address your application to the Director, Multifamily Housing Hub or Program Center in your local HUD Field Office. For Application Kits. For an application kit, please call the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD-8929. If you have a hearing or speech impairment, please call the Center's TTY number at 1-800-843- 2209. When requesting an application kit, please refer to Multifamily Housing Drug Elimination Grants, and provide your name, address (including zip code) and telephone number (including area code). An application kit also will be available on the Internet at http:// www.hud.gov. For Further Information and Technical Assistance. Your local HUD Field Office staff can answer most of the questions you have regarding this program section of the SuperNOFA and your application kit. Please contact the Resident Initiatives Specialist or Drug Elimination Grants contact person in your local office.. If you have a general question that the Field staff are unable to answer, please call Carissa Janis, Housing Project Manager, Office of Portfolio Management, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Room 6174, Washington, DC 20410; (202) 708-3944, extension 2484 (this number is not toll free). If you are hearing or speech impaired, you may access this number via TTY by calling the Federal Information Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339. II. Amount Allocated HUD is allocating grant funds under this Multifamily Drug Elimination Grant Program section of the SuperNOFA to the four Award Offices, in accordance with the following schedule: ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Award office covered Allocation ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Buffalo: $4,015,000 Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maine, New Hampshire, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, West Virginia, Virginia.................. Knoxville: 4,110,000 Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Puerto Rico, Mississippi, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska.......... Minneapolis 3,919,000 Illinois, Minnesota, Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio............................................... Little Rock 4,206,000 Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington.................. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ The Award Offices will select applicants for award according to the process discussed in Section V of this program section of the SuperNOFA. III. Program Description; Eligible Applicants; Eligible Activities (A) Program Description The Federally Assisted Low-Income Housing Drug Elimination Grant program is designed to assist property owners to reduce or eliminate drug-related criminal activity in and around their developments and to provide programs to prevent or eliminate drug use and abuse among their residents. While this program is centered in and around the premises of one or more HUD assisted multifamily housing sites, you are expected to work closely with other community social service and law enforcement organizations to achieve specific program objectives to reduce or eliminate drug-related criminal activity. The development of these strong working partnerships is an essential part of this program and is seen by the Department as necessary for long-term strategies to fight crime and drug abuse. Thus, while your activities are targeted in or around one or more developments, HUD expects you to link your activities with services available in your community. In particular, HUD is seeking plans that provide successful, proven, and cost- effective deterrents to drug-related crime and drug abuse that are designed to address the realities of federally assisted low-income housing environments. Changes to This Year's Program. This year the Rating Factors, application selection process, and submission requirements have changed significantly from last year. In developing your application, please pay special attention to Sections V.(A), V.(B), and VI., below, of this program section of the SuperNOFA, which discuss these items in detail. This program section of the SuperNOFA also clarifies that Section 202 developments with project-based Section 8 assistance are eligible to apply. A number of activities have been added to both the ``eligible'' and ``ineligible'' activities sections, so be sure to read these carefully. [[Page 9782]] (B) Eligible Applicants (1) To be eligible for funding, you must meet all of the applicable threshold requirements of Section II.(B) of the General Section of the SuperNOFA and must be owners of developments assisted under the following programs: (a) Sections 221(d)(3), 221(d)(4), or 236 of the National Housing Act; (b) Section 101 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1965; or (c) Project-based assistance under Section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937. This includes Section 202, Section 515, State Housing Finance Agency, and Moderate Rehabilitation developments. (2) If you are a management agent, you may prepare applications and sign application documents if you provide written authorization from the owner corporation as part of your application. (3) If your eligibility status changes during the course of the grant term, making you ineligible to receive a grant (e.g. due to prepayment of mortgage, sale of property, or opting out of a Section 8 Housing Assistance Payment (HAP) contract), HUD has the right to terminate your grant. (C) Eligible Activities Your proposed drug elimination program should foster interrelationships among the residents, the housing owner and management, the local law enforcement agencies, and other community groups affecting your development. Resident participation in the determination of programs and activities to be undertaken is critical to the success of all aspects of your program. In addition to working closely with the development's residents, your program must include working with community groups, the neighborhood law enforcement precinct, residents of adjacent developments, and the community as a whole to enhance and magnify the effect of your specific program activities. HUD seeks result-oriented programs that promote stability, positive and lasting changes in and around your development and the surrounding community, and which use proven cost-effective measures to reduce drug use or prevent criminal activity. With the very real need to protect occupants of HUD-assisted housing and the areas around the housing, the civil rights of all citizens must be protected. Your proposed strategies should be developed to ensure that crime-fighting and drug prevention activities are not undertaken in such a manner that civil rights or fair housing statutes are violated. You may not use race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, or familial status to profile persons as suspects or otherwise target them in conducting these activities. In addition, all segments of the population should be represented in developing and implementing your crime-fighting strategies. (1) Physical Improvements To Enhance Security. Physical improvements to enhance security are eligible activities under this program. All physical improvements must be accessible to persons with disabilities and must meet the accessibility requirements of 24 CFR part 8, Nondiscrimination Based on Handicap in Federally Assisted Programs and Activities of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Your physical improvements may include systems to limit building access to development residents; installation of barriers, lighting systems, fences, bolts, locks; landscaping or reconfiguration of common areas to discourage drug-related crime; or other physical improvements that enhance security and discourage drug-related activities. Rehabilitation of existing space for use by drug-related intervention and prevention programs is an eligible activity. (2) The provision of training, communications equipment, and other related equipment for use by voluntary tenant patrols acting in cooperation with local law enforcement officials is an eligible activity. (3) Programs to Reduce the Use of Drugs. Programs to reduce the use of drugs in and around your development, including drug-abuse prevention, intervention, referral, and treatment are eligible for funding. Where appropriate, you must establish a confidentiality policy regarding medical and disability-related information. Funding is permitted for reasonable, necessary, and justified leasing of vehicles for resident youth and adult education and training activities directly related to ``programs to reduce the use of drugs'' under this section. (a) Drug Prevention. Your drug prevention activities should provide a comprehensive drug prevention approach that will address the individual resident and his or her relationship to family, peers, and the community. Prevention activities should identify and change the conditions in federally assisted low-income housing that lead to drug- related problems and lower the risk of drug usage. Many components of a comprehensive approach, such as refusal and restraint skills training or drug-related family counseling, may already be available in your community. Your plan should include bringing program components already available in the community onto the premises. Proposed activities may include the following: (i) Drug Education Opportunities for Residents. Activities should provide both young people and adults with the working knowledge and skills needed to avoid the potential and immediate dangers of illegal drugs. You may contract (in accordance with 24 CFR Part 85.36) with drug education professionals to provide training or workshops. Contracted drug education services must reflect or be tied to your program plan. (ii) Family and Other Support Services. Prevention programs should be designed to help foster successful family relationships that may inhibit or reduce drug use. Examples of services include parenting skills workshops, short-term family counseling, child care, or family educational, cultural, or educational programs. You may provide these programs directly or refer residents to such services already available in your community. (iii) Youth Services. If you propose drug prevention services in your plan and your development has a substantial number of young residents, HUD strongly encourages you to include youth in your prevention programs. Your proposed prevention activities for youth must involve the active participation of youth in planning programs and service delivery. Such youth-oriented drug prevention programs may include youth leadership skills training; events incorporating dissemination of drug education information; and sports, recreational, cultural, and general education activities. (iv) Economic/Educational Opportunities. Eligible economic or educational programs should have the objectives of assisting residents in improving their educational status, vocational and job readiness skills, and opportunities for obtaining employment. The ultimate goal of services should be to assist residents in obtaining suitable lifelong employment and self-sufficiency to deter drug use, abuse, and related crime. (b) Intervention. The aim of intervention is to provide residents with substance abuse/dependency remission services to assist them in modifying their behavior; obtaining early treatment and structured aftercare; and maintaining remission. Your program should also be designed to prevent drug problems from continuing once detected. If you propose any [[Page 9783]] intervention program that seeks to accomplish the above objectives, you must describe how you expect the activities to assist residents in reducing or ceasing their use of illicit drugs and involvement in drug- related crime. (c) Drug Treatment. If your program provides treatment services, they must be targeted to the development and its residents. Your program should be conducted in or around the premises of the development, or residents must be referred to receive treatment from other available sources within the community. You may include implementing new drug referral treatment or aftercare services, or improve or expand currently available services. Your proposed drug treatment program should aim to reduce illicit drug use among residents by increasing resident accessibility to, and effective participation in, drug treatment activities, and decreasing criminal activity in and around your development. Your proposed plan must demonstrate a working partnership with your Single State Agency (or State license provider or authority with drug program coordination responsibilities in your State) to coordinate, develop, and implement your drug treatment program. In particular, you and the appropriate agency must confirm that your proposed drug treatment provider(s) has provided these services to similar populations for two prior years and your drug treatment program is consistent with the State treatment plan, meeting all State licensing requirements. Services eligible for funding may include: (i) Drug treatment supportive services designed for youth and/or maternal drug abusers. Examples of services are: prenatal/postpartum care; specialized counseling for women; or, parenting classes. You are encouraged to draw upon approaches that have proven effective with similar populations. (ii) Formal referral arrangements to treatment programs not in or around the development when treatment costs from sources other than this program are available. (iii) Transportation for residents to out-patient treatment and/or support programs. (iv) Family/collateral counseling. (v) Linking programs with educational/vocational counseling. (vi) Coordinating services with appropriate local drug agencies, HIV-related service agencies, and mental health and public health programs. (D) Ineligible Activities The following activities are not eligible for funding: (1) Hiring of, or contracting for, employment of security guards to provide security services in and around the development. (2) Any activity or improvement that is normally funded from project operating revenues for routine maintenance or repairs, or those activities or improvements that may be funded through reasonable and affordable rent increases; (3) The acquisition of real property or those physical improvements that involve the demolition of any units in your development or displacement of tenants; (4) Costs incurred prior to the effective date of your grant agreement, including consultant fees for surveys related to your application or its preparation; (5) Reimbursement of local law enforcement agencies for additional security and protective services; (6) Employment of one or more individuals to investigate drug- related crime in or around federally-assisted low-income developments and/or to provide evidence relating to such crime in any administrative or judicial proceeding; (7) Treatment of residents at any in-patient medical treatment programs or facilities; (8) Detoxification procedures designed to reduce or eliminate the presence of toxic substances in body tissues of a patient; (9) Maintenance drug programs; [Maintenance drugs are medications that are prescribed regularly for a long period of supportive therapy (e.g., methadone maintenance), rather than for immediate control of a disorder.] (10) Programs to treat alcoholism; and (11) Funding of police informants who provide information about drug-related activity. IV. Program Requirements In addition to the requirements listed in Section II of the General Section of this SuperNOFA, you must also meet the additional requirements in this Section IV. These requirements apply to all activities, programs, and functions used to plan, budget, and evaluate the work funded under your program. (A) Administrative Costs Administrative costs cannot exceed 10% of your proposed program's total cost. (B) Term of Funded Activities Your grant term cannot exceed twelve months. (C) Multiple Developments There is no limit to the number of developments that can be included in your application. However, if you include more than one development in your application, all developments must be eligible and located in the same Field Office jurisdiction. In addition, you must demonstrate in your response to Rating Factor 3 ``Soundness of Approach--(Quality of the Plan)'' that your program will be feasible to implement among all proposed developments. (D) Subgrants and Subcontracting You may directly undertake or subcontract for any of the eligible activities under this Multifamily Drug Elimination Program section of the SuperNOFA. Resident groups that are not incorporated may work with you in the implementation of your program, but may not receive funds as subgrantees. (E) Collection of Crime Data If you receive a grant, you will be required to collect and report on Parts I and II crime data. Parts I and II crime data are defined by the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) System (see Rating Factor 2, paragraph (1)(d)). V. Application Selection Process (A) Rating and Ranking All applications will be evaluated competitively and ranked against applications in the same Field Office. The maximum number of points for this program is 102. This includes two Empowerment Zone/Enterprise Community (EZ/EC) bonus points, as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. For bonus points related to activities located in Empowerment Zones or Enterprise Communities, the applicant must demonstrate that there is a connection between such EZ or EC and tenant, local government, and local community support and participation in the design and implementation of the proposed activities to be funded under this program. (B) Distribution of Funds Each Award Office may recommend a total number of awards up to the amount allocated for the area covered by the Award Office. Award Offices will receive the scores from each HUD Field Office which has received, rated, and ranked its applications. The Award Offices will conduct the selection process as follows: The Award Office will first select the highest ranked application in each Field Office for funding. After this ``round,'' the Award Office will select the second highest [[Page 9784]] ranked application in each Field Office for funding (the second round). The Award Office will continue this process with the third, fourth, and so on, highest ranked applications in each Field Office until the last complete round is selected for funding. If available funds exist to fund some but not all eligible applications in the next round, the Award Office will make awards to those remaining applications in rank order regardless of Field Office and will fully fund as many as possible with remaining funds. Any funds still remaining after the Award Office distribution by rank will be forwarded to Headquarters, which shall make awards to fully fund as many remaining applications as possible by national rank order. All applications must receive a score equal to or greater than the minimum score of 70 without bonus points to be considered for funding. The selection process is designed to achieve both geographic diversity and a more equitable distribution of grant awards throughout the country. Every HUD Field Office will receive several grant awards, as long as the scores of their applications meet or exceed the minimum score. It also means that your one application submitted to a Field Office will primarily compete for funding with other applications submitted to that same Field Office. (C) Procedure to resolve tied scores. If two or more applications have the same score and there are insufficient funds to fund all of them, the application with the highest score for the Soundness of Approach rating factor shall be selected for funding. If a tie still remains, the application with the highest score for the Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience rating factor shall be selected. Further tied applications will be selected by their scores in the Need/Extent of Problem, Leveraging Resources, and Comprehensiveness and Coordination rating factors, in that order. If the applications received the same score for each of the five factors, the Award office or Headquarters will break the remaining tie by selecting the application that requests less funding. (D) Factors for Award Used to Evaluate and Rate Applications. The five factors in this section total 100 points. An application must receive a score of at least 70 points to be eligible for funding under this competition. Each application submitted will be evaluated using the following selection criteria set forth below. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (20 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have organizational resources necessary to successfully implement the proposed activities in a timely manner. In rating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you demonstrate the capabilities described below. (1) (20 points) The knowledge and experience of your staff and administrative capacity to manage grants, including administrative support functions, procurement, lines of authority, and fiscal management capacity. Your narrative must include a discussion of financial capacity, staff resources, and prior experience that will enable you to effectively administer a grant and meet reporting requirements. This narrative must not exceed five pages. (2) HUD's evaluation approach. (a) For Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) and tribally designated housing entities (TDHEs) that had previously applied as IHAs, HUD will also consider such measurements as the uniform crime index, physical inspections, agency monitoring of records, Line of Credit Control System (LOCCS) Reports, audit and such other relevant information available to HUD on the capacity of the owner or manager to administer the grant. (b) For owners of federally-assisted low income housing, HUD will also consider the most recent Management Review (including Rural Housing Management Review), HUD's Uniform Physical Conditions Standards review, State Agency review, physical inspection, and other relevant information available to HUD on the capacity of the owner and manager to undertake the grant. (3) (Deduct up to 5 points for prior poor performance) Your performance in administering Drug Elimination funding in the previous 5 years. You must identify your participation in HUD grant programs within the preceding five years and discuss the degree of your success in implementing and managing these grant programs. Your discussion should describe program implementation, timely drawdown of funds, timely submission of required reports with satisfactory outcomes related to the plan and timetable, audit compliance, whether there are any unresolved findings from prior HUD reports (e.g., performance or finance) reviews of audits undertaken by HUD, the Office of Inspector General, the General Accounting Office or independent public accountants). For PHAs, your past experience will be evaluated in terms of your ability to attain demonstrated measurable progress in tracking drug related crime, enforcement of screening and lease procedures in implementation of the ``One Strike and You're Out Initiative'' (as applicable), the extent to which you have formed a collaboration with Tribal, State and local law enforcement agencies and courts to gain access to criminal conviction records of potential tenants to determine their suitability for residence in public housing. Such data will be measured and evaluated based on your Public Housing Management Assessment Program (PHMAP) score (24 CFR part 901). Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (25 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for funding your proposed program activities to address a documented problem in the target area (i.e., the degree of the severity of the drug-related crime problem in the development proposed for funding). In responding to this factor, HUD will evaluate your application based on the extent to which a critical level of need for the proposed activities is explained and you provide a justification for the urgency of meeting the need in your development and the area around your development. Your application must include a description of the extent and nature of drug-related crime ``in or around'' the housing units or development you propose for funding. You will receive up to 25 points for this factor if your statistics and explanation of need establish critical crime problems and an urgency to address these problems in and around your development. To receive the maximum number of points, you must provide statistics for both the premises of your development and the smallest geographic area surrounding your development for which objective statistics are available in your community, town, or city. If you use statistics from institutions (e.g. hospitals or schools), the institutions must directly serve the residents of the targeted development. If the statistics you provide do not indicate a critical need, urgency to meet this need, or you do not provide statistics that document the need within your development or the area around your development, you will not receive the maximum number of points. If you do not submit the letter or documentation for the ``non-objective'' data, indicated in paragraph [[Page 9785]] 2(a), below, you will also receive fewer points. The statistics and information you provide must include the following: (1) ``Objective Crime Data'' relevant to the target area. Such data should consist of verifiable records and not anecdotal reports. Where appropriate, the statistics should be reported both in real numbers and as an annual percentage of the residents in each development (e.g., 20 arrests in a one-year period for distribution of heroin in a development with 100 residents reflects a 20% occurrence rate). Such data may include: (a) Police records or other verifiable information from records on the types or sources of drug related crime in the targeted development and surrounding area; (b) The number of lease terminations or evictions for drug-related crime at the targeted development; and (c) The number of emergency room admissions for drug use or that result from drug-related crime. Such information may be obtained from police Departments and/or fire departments, emergency medical service agencies and hospitals. The number of police calls for service from your development that include resident initiated calls, officer- initiated calls, domestic violence calls, drug distribution complaints, found drug paraphernalia, gang activity, graffiti that reflects drugs or gang-related activity, vandalism, drug arrests, and abandoned vehicles. (d) To the extend possible, you should obtain statistics on Part I and Part II crimes, as defined by the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) System. Part 1 crimes include: criminal homicide, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault two (including domestic violence through use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm), burglary-breaking or entering, larceny-theft (except motor vehicle theft), motor vehicle theft, and arson. Part II crimes include: assaults, forgery and counterfeiting, fraud, embezzlement, vandalism, weapons (carrying or possessing), prostitution and commercialized vice, sex offenses (except forcible rape, prostitution, and commercialized vice), drug abuse violations, gambling, offenses against the family and children, driving under the influence, violation of liquor laws, drunkenness, disorderly conduct, vagrancy, all other offenses related to curfew and loitering laws and runaways. For PHAs, such data should include housing authority police records on the types and sources of drug related crime ``in or around'' developments as reflected in crime statistics or other supporting data from Federal, State, Tribal, or local law enforcement agencies. (2) Other Crime Data. If you are unable to attain objective crime statistics as mentioned above, you may submit other supporting, verifiable data on the extent of drug-related crime in the target area. If you submit other relevant information in place of objective data, you must provide the following to receive the maximum number of points: (a) A letter or supporting documentation from your local law enforcement agency or another relevant neighborhood organization explaining why the objective data mentioned above is not available, and (b) A narrative explanation of the reasons why objective data could not be obtained, what efforts were made to obtain it, and what efforts will be made (if possible) during the grant period to begin obtaining the data. Such data may include the following: (i) Surveys of residents and staff in the targeted development surveyed on drug-related crime or on-site reviews to determine drug/ crime activity; and government or scholarly studies or other research in the past year that analyze drug-related crime activity in your targeted development. (ii) Vandalism cost at your targeted development, to include elevator vandalism (where appropriate) and other vandalism attributable to drug-related crime. (iii) Information from schools, health service providers, residents and Federal, State, local, and Tribal officials, and the verifiable opinions and observations of individuals having direct knowledge of drug-related crime, and the nature and frequency of these problems in your development proposed for assistance. (These individuals may include Federal, State, Tribal, and local government law enforcement officials, resident or community leaders, school officials, community medical officials, substance abuse, treatment (dependency/remission) or counseling professionals, or other social service providers.) (iv) The school dropout rate and level of absenteeism for youth that you can relate to drug-related crime. (v) To the extent that the community's Consolidated Plan identifies the level of the drug abuse and related crime problems in and around your targeted development, and the urgency in meeting the need, references to these documents should be included in your response. You will receive more points if you use these documents to identify need. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach--(Quality of the Plan) (35 Points) This factor addresses the quality and effectiveness of your proposed work plan. In rating this factor, HUD will consider the impact of your proposed activities and the tangible benefits that can be attained by the community and by the target population. Your application must include a detailed narrative describing each proposed activity for crime reduction and elimination efforts for each development proposed for assistance, the amount and extent of resources committed to each activity or service proposed, and process used to collect, maintain, analyze and report Part I and II crimes as defined by the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR System, as well as police workload data. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the following: (1) (14 points) Your plan's approach to address the drug-related crime problem and associated problems in the development proposed for funding, the resources allocated, and the extent to which your proposed activities are targeted to residents, provide for linkages with existing community resources, and are likely to have long term impacts on reducing drug use and drug-related crime in and around your targeted development. Also, you must include the rational for the proposed activities and methods to be used in developing your program and approach to reducing drug-related crime and drug abuse. If you propose drug prevention or intervention activities, these services must constitute a continuing and comprehensive approach to deter drug use or abuse among your residents and their neighbors. Your proposal must demonstrate how your activities work together with other on-going activities in the community and how these activities rely upon each other to form a holistic plan. Your plan must include the following items. If these are not included, you will receive fewer points under this subfactor: (a) An explanation of how any proposed physical improvements will be accessible to persons with disabilities and a statement that they will meet the accessibility requirements of 24 CFR part 8, Nondiscrimination Based on Handicap in Federally Assisted Programs and Activities of the Department of Housing and Urban Development; (b) A discussion of how any drug education services that you propose to undertake directly or through a subcontract will reflect the objectives of your program plan; (c) A specific explanation of how you plan to incorporate the active participation of youth in planning prevention programs and services targeted to their needs; and (d) If you propose drug treatment activities, you must provide a letter from your Single State Agency (or State license provider or authority with drug program coordination responsibilities in your State) that states that your program is effectively coordinating, developing, and implementing drug treatment programs in partnership with that entity. (2) (10 points) The anticipated effectiveness of the plan and proposed activities in reducing or eliminating drug-related crime problems immediately and over an extended period. This should include the following: (a) A description of established performance goals for the results to be achieved during the period of your grant. The goals must be objective, quantifiable, and measurable, and they must be outcome or result-oriented. Outcomes include accomplishments, results, impact and the ultimate effects of the program on the drug or crime problem in the target/development area. (b) An explanation of how your proposed activities enhance and are coordinated with on going or proposed programs sponsored by HUD, such as Neighborhood Networks, Campus of Learners, Operation Safe Home, ``One Strike and You're Out'', Department of Justice Weed and Seed Efforts, or any other prevention/intervention/treatment activities in your community. Explain the specific steps you will take to share and coordinate information on solutions and outcomes with other law- enforcement and governmental agencies, and a description of any written agreements in place or that will be put in place by you with these entities. (3) (3 points) Evidence and explanation of how proposed activities have been effective in similar circumstances in controlling drug- related crime. If you are proposing new methods for which there is limited knowledge of effectiveness, you should provide the basis for modifying past practices and rationale for why you believe the modification will yield more effective results. HUD will look more favorably upon proposals that target grant funds to hard program costs and propose minimal, if any, administrative expenses. (4) (3 points) The process you will use to maintain, analyze, and report Part I and II crimes, as well as police workload data. Police workload data may include, but are not limited to: all calls for service by residents of your development, crime pattern over a period of time by type of crime, and plans to improve data collection and reporting. Your proposed analysis of the data collected must include a method for assessing the impact of activities on the collected crime statistics throughout your award period. The results of your activities and the effect on statistics is of much greater importance than the method you will use to collect such data, so you should pay attention to the benchmarks you establish for measuring and evaluating your performance, particularly measuring changes in crime rates by Part I and Part II crime data. (5) (1 point deducted if not addressed) The extent to which the applicant's elimination of crime in a development or neighborhood will expand fair housing choice and will affirmatively further fair housing. Provide a brief statement outlining the benchmarks you will use to measure your success in affirmatively furthering fair housing through this program. This may include such items as lower vacancy and turnover rates and increased new applications for housing in your development and in other rental properties in your neighborhood, new businesses and other community development initiatives in your area, or increased rates of homeownership in your community. If such a statement is not provided, you will not receive this point. (6) (5 points) Resident Support. The extent to which you have sought the support of residents in planning and implementing the proposed activities. (a) You must provide evidence that you actively sought comments, suggestions, and support from residents for your proposed plan. State the steps you took to obtain this information and support. (b) Describe and provide written documentation of these comments, suggestions, and support. HUD needs clear evidence that the residents agree with, support, and will work with your proposed program. If applicable, you must explain why you do not have written documentation of such support or did not receive any comments or suggestions. (c) Describe how residents will be involved in implementing your program. If involvement would be minimal or not appropriate, please state and explain why. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Community Resources (10 Points) To receive points under this rating factor, you must provide evidence of the level and type of participation and support by the local government or law enforcement agency for your proposed activities. This should include the level of assistance received from local government, community organizations, and/or law enforcement agencies. If a community organization is providing you with staff or supporting services, you must include a letter from each organization providing staff or support in order to receive maximum points. Each letter must specify what type of participation or contributions the organization will make to your program. Such letters must be from community or public agencies (or businesses) within your unit of general local government (i.e. county, town, city) or incorporated resident organizations. Letters stating general support or from people or organizations not in or around your development are not adequate and you should not include them in your application. Rating Factor 5: Comprehensiveness and Coordination (10 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you coordinate your activities with other known organizations, participate or promote participation in your community's Consolidated Planning process, and are working towards addressing a need in a holistic and comprehensive manner through linkages with other activities in the community. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider your prior efforts and future plans to coordinate with other local agencies and organizations as follows: (1) (3 points) Describe past efforts to coordinate your proposed activities with those of other groups or organizations prior to submission of your application in order to best complement, support, and coordinate all known activities. Explain what specific steps you will take to share information on solutions and outcomes with others. Please describe any written agreements or memoranda of understanding that are or will be in place after award. (2) (6 points) Explain what specific steps you have taken or will take to develop linkages or coordinate comprehensive solutions through meetings, information networks, planning processes, or other mechanisms. Explain your past efforts or planned efforts for involvement with such programs or other HUD-funded projects/activities outside the scope of [[Page 9787]] those covered by the Consolidated Plan; and/or other Federal, State, or locally funded activities, including those proposed or on-going in the community. (3) (1 point) Explain specific steps you have taken or will take to become active in your community's Consolidated Planning process (including the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice) established to identify and address a need/problem that is related to the activities you propose. VI. Application Submission Requirements (A) Number of Applications, Projects Per Application, and Maximum Application Amounts. If you are an owner of an eligible project listed in Section III.(B) of this program section of the SuperNOFA, you may only submit one application for one or more projects within a local HUD Field Office jurisdiction. The maximum amount of funds you may receive for an application with one development is $125,000 and the maximum for an application for two or more developments is $200,000. (B) If you are an owner of developments served by a number of HUD Field Offices, you may submit multiple applications, as long as you submit only one application per Field Office jurisdiction. (C) There is no limit to the number of developments per application. However, all developments in one application must be eligible and located in the same Field Office jurisdiction. You must demonstrate in Rating Factor 3 ``Soundness of Approach--(Quality of the Plan)'' that your program will be feasible to implement among all proposed developments. In addition, you must provide pertinent information for each Rating Factor for each proposed development. VI. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. VII. Environmental Requirements It is anticipated that activities under this program are categorically excluded under 24 CFR 50.19(b)(4), (b)(12), or (b)(13). If grant funds will be used to cover the cost of any non-exempt activities, HUD will perform an environmental review to the extent required by 24 CFR part 50, prior to grant award. VIII. Authority This program is authorized under Chapter 2, subtitle C, title V of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 11901 et. seq.), as amended by section 581 of the National Affordable Housing Act of 1990 (Pub. L. 102-550, approved October 28, 1992). The regulations for the program are found in 24 CFR part 761, Drug Elimination Programs. BILLING CODE 4210-32-Y [[Page 9789]] [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN26FE99.034 BILLING CODE 4210-32-C [[Page 9791]]