Funding Availability for COPC Program

Funding Availability for the Community
Outreach Partnership Centers Program
Program Overview

    Purpose of the Program. To provide funds to community colleges, four-year colleges, and universities to establish and operate Community Outreach Partnership Centers (COPCs) to address the problems of urban areas.

Available Funds. Approximately $7.5 million. Eligible Applicants. Public and private profit and nonprofit institutions of higher education granting two- or four-year degrees and accredited by a national or regional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Application Deadline. June 9, 1999. Match. 50% of the total costs of establishing and operating research activities and 25% of the total costs of establishing and operating outreach activities. Additional Information: If you are interested in applying for funding under this program, please review carefully the General Section of this SuperNOFA and the following additional information. I. Application Due Date, Application Kits, Further Information, and Technical Assistance Application Due Date. Your completed application is due on or before 12:00 midnight, Eastern time on June 9, 1999, at HUD Headquarters. See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for specific procedures governing the form of application submission (e.g., mailed applications, express mail, overnight delivery, or hand carried). Address for Submitting Applications. Submit your completed application (one original and two copies) to: Processing and Control Branch, Office of Community Planning and Development, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Room 7251, Washington, DC 20410. When submitting your application, please refer to COPC and include your name, mailing address (including zip code) and telephone number (including area code). For Application Kits. For an application kit and supplemental information you should call the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800- HUD-8929. Persons with hearing or speech impairments may call the Center's TTY number at 1-800-483-2209. When requesting an application kit, you should refer to COPC and provide your name, address (including zip code), and telephone number (including area code). You may also download the application kit on the Internet through the HUD web site at http://www.hud.gov. For Further Information. For answers to your questions, you have several options. You may contact Jane Karadbil of HUD's Office of University Partnerships at (202) 708-1537, ext. 5918. If you have a speech or hearing impairment, you may call HUD's TTY number (202) 708- 0770, or 1-800-877-8399 (the Federal Information Relay Service TTY). Other than the ``800'' number, these numbers are not toll-free. You may also reach Ms. Karadbil via the Internet at Jane__R.__Karadbil@hud.gov. For Technical Assistance. HUD will hold an information broadcast via satellite for potential applicants to learn more about the program and preparation of an application. For more information about the date and time of this broadcast, you should consult the HUD web site at the web address listed above. II. Amount Allocated Up to $7.5 million to fund grants under the program. This year, HUD will award two kinds of grants--(A) New Grants to applicants who have never received a COPC grant before to undertake eligible work and (B) New Directions Grants to fund previous COPC recipients (as identified in III.(B) below) to undertake new directions in their activities. Institutionalization Grants will not be funded under this funding announcement for COPC. HUD will use up to $6.6 million to fund New Grants and up to $900,000 to fund New Directions Grants. III. Program Description; Eligible Applicants; Eligible Activities (A) Program Description. The purpose of this COPC Program is to assist in establishing or carrying out outreach and applied research activities addressing the problems of urban areas. Funding under this program is used to establish and operate local Community Outreach Partnership Centers (COPC). The five key concepts that your COPC Program should include are: (1) You should provide outreach, technical assistance, applied research, and empowerment to neighborhoods and neighborhood-based organizations based on what the residents decide is needed, not based on what the institution thinks is appropriate for that neighborhood; (2) Community-based organizations should be your partners throughout the life of the project, from planning to implementation; (3) Your applied research should be related to the outreach activities and be used to influence your activities within the grant period or shortly after it ends. HUD will not fund research without practical application; (4) The assistance you provide should be primarily by faculty, students, or to a limited extent, by neighborhood residents or community-based organizations funded by the university; and (5) Your program should be part of your institution's broader effort to meet its urban mission, and be supported by senior officials, rather than just the work of a few faculty members. Your proposed activities should not duplicate those of other entities in the community and should be appropriate for an institution of higher education to undertake in light of its teaching and research missions. (B) Eligible Applicants. Eligible applicants for both New Grants and New Directions Grants are public or private nonprofit institutions of higher education granting two- or four-year degrees and accredited by a national or regional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. For New Grants, only applicants that have never previously received a New Grant or an Institutionalization Grant are eligible. For New Directions Grants, only COPC grantees who received grants in Fiscal Years 1994, 1995, or 1996 are eligible. Joint Community Development Program grantees are not eligible for either kind of funding, nor are FY 1997 and 1998 COPC Grantees. Consortia of eligible institutions may apply, as long as one institution is designated the lead applicant. Since the Statement of Work and other facets of the technical review are assessed in the context of the proposed staffing, and in order to fund as many eligible applicants as possible, HUD has determined that you may be part of only one consortium or submit only one application or you will be disqualified. HUD will hold you responsible for ensuring that neither you nor any part of your institution, including specific faculty, participate in more than one application. For New Directions Grants, if you originally received funding as a consortium, you are not required to submit again with all the consortium members. Members of a previously approved consortium may submit on their own or as part of their old consortium. However, as with New Grants, only one application from an institution will be permitted. Different campuses of the same university system are eligible to apply, even if one campus has already received COPC funding. Such campuses are eligible as separate applicants only if [[Page 9654]] they have administrative and budgeting structures independent of other campuses in the system. (C) Eligible Activities. Your COPC Program must combine research with outreach, work with communities and local governments and address the multidimensional problems that beset urban areas. To meet the threshold requirements, your application should be multifaceted and address three or more urban problems. You should address urban problems associated with housing, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, infrastructure, health care, job training, education, crime prevention, planning, community organizing, and other areas deemed appropriate by the Secretary. Single purpose applications are not eligible. Funded research must have a clear near-term potential for solving specific, significant urban problems. You must have the capacity to apply your research results and to work with communities and local institutions, including neighborhood groups and other appropriate community stakeholders, in applying these results to specific real-life urban problems. While the list of eligible and ineligible activities is the same for both New Grant applicants and New Directions Grant applicants, New Directions Grant applicants must demonstrate that the proposed activities either implement new eligible projects in the current target neighborhood(s) or implement eligible projects in a new target neighborhood(s). Eligible activities include: (1) Research activities that have practical application for solving specific problems in designated communities and neighborhoods, including evaluation of the effectiveness of the outreach activities. In order to ensure that the primary focus of your project is on outreach, research may not total more than one-quarter of the total project costs contained in any grant made under this COPC funding announcement (including the required 50% match). (2) Outreach, technical assistance and information exchange activities which are designed to address specific urban problems in designated communities and neighborhoods. Such activities must total no less than three-quarters of your total project costs (including the required 25% match). Examples of outreach activities include, but are not limited to: (a) Job training and other training projects, such as workshops, seminars and one-on-one and on-the-job training; (b) Design of community or metropolitan strategies to resolve urban problems of communities and neighborhoods; (c) Innovative use of funds to provide direct technical expertise and assistance to local community groups, residents, and other appropriate community stakeholders to assist them in resolving local problems such as homelessness, housing discrimination, and impediments to fair housing choice; (d) Technical assistance in business start-up activities for low- and moderate-income individuals and organizations, including business start-up training and technical expertise and assistance, mentor programs, assistance in developing small loan funds, business incubators, etc; (e) Technical assistance to local public housing authorities on welfare-to-work initiatives and physical transformations of public or assisted housing, including development of accessible and visitable housing; (f) Assistance to communities to improve consolidated housing and community development plans and remove impediments to design and implementation of such plans; (g) Assistance to communities to improve their fair housing planning process; (h) Services to assist low-income students to attend college, as part of the U.S. Department of Education's Gaining Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program (GEAR UP). (For more information call 1-800-USA-LEARN or visit the Department of Education's website at www.ed.gov.); and (i) Regional projects that maximize the interaction of targeted inner city distressed neighborhoods with suburban job opportunities similar to HUD's Bridges-to-Work or Moving to Opportunity programs. (3) Funds for faculty development including paying for course time or summer support to enable faculty members to work on the COPC. (4) Funds for stipends for students (which cannot cover tuition and fees) when they are working on the COPC. (5) Activities to carry out the ``Responsibilities'' listed under Section IV(B) below. These activities may include leases for office space in which to house the Community Outreach Partnership Center, under the following conditions: (a) The lease must be for existing facilities not requiring rehabilitation or consultation; (b) No repairs or renovations of the property may be undertaken with Federal funds; and (c) Properties in the Coastal Barrier Resource System designated under the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (16 U.S.C. 3501) cannot be leased with Federal funds. (6) Components of your program may address metropolitan or regional strategies. You must clearly demonstrate how: (a) Your strategies are directly related to what the targeted neighborhoods and neighborhood-based organizations have decided is needed; and (b) Neighborhoods and neighborhood organizations are involved in the development and implementation of the metropolitan or regional strategies. (D) Ineligible Activities. (1) Research activities that have no clear and immediate practical application for solving urban problems or do not address specific problems in designated communities and neighborhoods. (2) Any type of construction, rehabilitation, or other physical development costs. (3) Costs used for routine operations and day-to-day administration of institutions of higher education, local governments or neighborhood groups. IV. Program Requirements In addition to the program requirements listed in the General Section of this SuperNOFA, grantees must meet the following program requirements: (A) Grant Sizes and Terms. Each New Grant will be for a three-year period. In order to ensure that as many eligible applicants are funded as possible, HUD has set the maximum size of any New Grant at $400,000. Because these projects are quite complex, HUD has also set the minimum grant size at $250,000. Since the Statement of Work and other facets of the technical review are assessed in the context of the proposed budget and grant request, and in the interest of fairness to all applicants, HUD will not accept a New Grant application that is under $250,000 or over $400,000. Each New Directions Grant will be for a two-year period. HUD has set the maximum size of any New Directions Grant at $150,000. Since the Statement of Work and other facets of the technical review are assessed in the context of the proposed budget and grant request, and in the interest of fairness to all applicants, HUD will not accept a New Directions application that is over $150,000. (B) Responsibilities. You are required to: (1) Employ the research and outreach resources of your institution of higher education to solve specific urban [[Page 9655]] problems identified by communities served by your Center; (2) Establish outreach activities in areas identified in your application as the communities to be served; (3) Establish a community advisory committee comprised of representatives of local institutions and residents of the communities to be served to assist in identifying local needs and advise on the development and implementation of strategies to address those issues; (4) Coordinate outreach activities in communities to be served by your Center; (5) Facilitate public service projects in the communities served by your Center; (6) Act as a clearinghouse for dissemination of information; (7) Develop instructional programs, convene conferences, and provide training for local community leaders, when appropriate; and (8) Exchange information with other Centers. The clearinghouse function in (6) above refers to a local or regional clearinghouse for dissemination of information and is separate and distinct from the functions in (8) above, which relate to the provision of information to the University Partnerships Clearinghouse, which is the national clearinghouse for the program. (C) Cap on Research Costs. No more than 25% of your total project costs (Federal share plus match) can be spent on research activities. (D) Match. The non-Federal share may include cash or the value of non-cash contributions, equipment and other allowable in-kind contributions as detailed in 24 CFR part 84, and in particular Sec. 84.23 entitled ``cost sharing or matching.'' You may not count as match any costs that would be ineligible for funding under the program (e.g., housing rehabilitation). (1) If you are a New Grant applicant, you must meet the following match requirements: (a) Research Activities. 50% of the total project costs of establishing and operating research activities. (b) Outreach Activities. 25% of the total project costs of establishing and operating outreach activities. (2) If you are a New Directions Grant applicant, you must meet the following match requirements: (a) Research Activities. 60% of the total project costs of establishing and operating research activities. (b) Outreach Activities. 35% of the total project costs of establishing and operating outreach activities. An example of how you should calculate the match is included in the application kit. (E) Administrative. Your grant will be governed by the provisions of 24 CFR part 84 (Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations), A-21 (Cost Principles for Education Institutions), and A-133 (Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations. You may not spend more than 20% of your grant on planning or administrative costs. The application kit contains a detailed explanation of what these costs are. You can access the OMB circulars at the White House website at http://whitehouse.gov/WH/EOP/OMB/html/circulars. V. Application Selection Process There will be two separate competitions--one for New Grants and one for New Directions Grants. For each type of grant, applications will be rated, ranked, and selected separately. Two types of reviews will be conducted: a threshold review to determine your applicant eligibility; and a technical review to rate your application based on the rating factors in this Section, paragraph C below. (A) Additional Threshold Requirements For Funding Consideration. Under the threshold review, you will be rejected from the competition if you are not in compliance with the requirements of the General Section of the SuperNOFA or if you do not meet the following additional standards: (1) You have met the statutory match requirements, if applying for a New Grant or the higher match levels described above, if applying for a New Directions Grant. (2) You have proposed a program in which at least 75% of the total project costs will be for outreach activities. (3) For New Grants, you have requested a Federal grant between $250,000 and $400,000 over the three-year grant period. For New Directions Grants, you have requested a Federal grant that is no more than $150,000 over the two-year grant period. (4) You have addressed at least three urban issues, such as affordable housing, fair housing, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, infrastructure, health care; job training, education, crime prevention, planning, and community organizing. (5) You and any part of your organization are participating in only one application. (B) Factors For Award Used To Evaluate and Rate Applications. The factors for rating and ranking applicants, and maximum points for each factor, are provided below. The maximum number of points for this program is 102. This includes two EZ/EC bonus points, as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (15 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have the organizational resources necessary to successfully implement the proposed activities in a timely manner. In rating this factor HUD will consider the extent to which the proposal demonstrates: (1) For New Grants (15 points): For New Direction Grants (10 points). (a) The knowledge and experience of your overall proposed project director and staff, including the day-to-day program manager, consultants and contractors in planning and managing programs for which funding is being requested. Experience will be judged in terms of recent, relevant and successful experience of your staff to undertake eligible program activities. In rating this factor, HUD will consider experience within the last 5 years to be recent; experience pertaining to the specific activities being proposed to be relevant; and experience producing specific accomplishments to be successful. The following categories will be evaluated: (i) Undertaking research activities in specific communities that have a clear near-term potential for practical application to significant urban issues, such as affordable housing, fair housing including accessible and visitable housing, economic development, neighborhood revitalization, infrastructure, health care, job training, education, crime prevention, planning, and community organizing; (ii) Undertaking outreach activities in specific communities to solve or ameliorate significant urban issues; (iii) Undertaking projects with community-based organizations or local governments; and (iv) Providing leadership in solving community problems and making national contributions to solving long-term and immediate urban problems. (2) For New Directions Grants only (5 points). The extent to which you performed successfully under your previous COPC grant(s), as measured by: (a) Your achievement of specific measurable outcome objectives; and (b) Your leveraging of funding beyond the funds originally proposed to be leveraged for that project. [[Page 9656]] Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (15 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for funding your proposed program activities and your indication of the urgency of meeting the need in the target area. In responding to this factor, you will be evaluated on the extent to which you document the level of need for the proposed activity and the urgency in meeting the need. You should use statistics and analyses contained in a data source(s) that: (1) Is sound and reliable. To the extent that the targeted community's Consolidated Plan and Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI) identify the level of the problem and the urgency in meeting the need, you should include references to these documents in your response. The Department will review your application more favorably if you used these documents to identify need, when applicable. If the proposed activity is not covered under the scope of the Consolidated Plan and Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI), you should indicate such, and use other sound data sources to identify the level of need and the urgency in meeting the need. Types of other sources include Census reports, Continuum of Care gaps analysis, law enforcement agency crime reports, Public Housing Authorities' Comprehensive Plan, and other sound and reliable sources appropriate for your program. You may also address needs in terms of fulfilling court orders or consent decrees, settlements, conciliation agreements, and voluntary compliance agreements. (2) To the extent possible, the data you use should be specific to the area where the proposed activity will be carried out. You should document needs as they apply to the area where activities will be targeted, rather than the entire locality or state, unless the target area is an entire locality or state. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (50 Points) This factor addresses the quality and cost-effectiveness of your proposed work plan. There must be a clear relationship between your proposed activities, community needs and the purpose of the program funding for you to receive points for this factor. The factor will be evaluated based on the extent to which the proposed work plan will: (1) (10 points) Identify the specific services or activities to be performed. In reviewing this subfactor HUD will consider the extent to which: (a) Your proposal outlines a clear research agenda, based on your familiarity with existing research on the subject. (b) You demonstrate how the research will fit into and strengthen the outreach strategy and activities. For example, if you propose to study the extent of housing abandonment in a neighborhood and then design a plan for reusing this housing, you would be able to demonstrate the link between your proposed research and outreach strategies. (c) Your plan outlines a clear outreach agenda and there is a plan for involving your institution as a whole in the execution of your outreach strategy. Your outreach program should provide for on-site or a frequent presence in the targeted communities and neighborhoods. (d) Your outreach agenda includes training projects for local community leaders, for example, to increase their capacity to direct their organizations or undertake various kinds of community development projects. (e) You demonstrate that your proposed research and outreach activities do not duplicate research and outreach previously completed or currently underway by others. (f) You propose activities that are appropriate for an institution of higher education because they are tied to the institution's teaching or research mission. (2) (9 points) Involve the communities to be served in implementation of your activities. In reviewing this subfactor, HUD will look at the extent to which: (a) You have formed or will form one or more Community Advisory Committees, comprised of representatives of local institutions and a balance of the race, ethnic, disability status, gender, and income of the residents of the communities to be served to develop and implement strategies to address the needs identified in Factor 2. You will be expected to demonstrate that you have already formed such a committee(s) or secured the commitment of the appropriate persons to serve on the committee(s), rather than just describing generally the types of people whose involvement you will seek. (b) You have involved a wide range of neighborhood organizations and local government entities in the identification of your research and outreach activities. (3) (5 points) Help solve or address an urgent problem as identified in Rating Factor 2 and will achieve the purposes of the program within the grant period. In reviewing this subfactor, HUD will look at the extent to which: (a) You identify specific time phased and measurable objectives to be accomplished; your proposed short and long term program objectives to be achieved as a result of the proposed activities; the tangible and measurable impacts your work program will have on the community in general and the target area or population in particular including affirmatively furthering fair housing for classes protected under the Fair Housing Act; and the relationship of your proposed activities to other on-going or proposed efforts to improve the economic, social or living environment in the impact area; and (b) Grant funds will pay for activities you conduct directly, rather than passing funds through to other entities. (4) (4 points) Potentially yield innovative strategies or ``best practices'' that can be replicated and disseminated to other organizations, including nonprofit organizations, State and local governments. In reviewing this subfactor, HUD will assess your demonstrated ability to disseminate results of research and outreach activities to other COPCs and communities. HUD will evaluate your past experience and the scope and quality of your plan to disseminate information on COPC results, strategies, and lessons learned through such means as conferences, cross-site technical assistance, publications, etc. (5) (8 points) (a) (3 points) Further and support the policy priorities of HUD including: (i) Promoting healthy homes; (ii) Providing opportunities for self-sufficiency, particularly for persons enrolled in welfare to work programs; (iii) Enhancing on-going efforts to eliminate drugs and crime from neighborhoods through program policy efforts such as ``One Strike and You're Out'' or the ``Officer Next Door'' initiative; (iv) Providing educational and job training opportunities through such initiatives as Neighborhood Networks, Campus of Learners and linking to AmeriCorps activities. (b) (5 points) Include activities that affirmatively further fair housing, for example: (i) Working with other entities in the community to overcome impediments to fair housing, such as discrimination in the sale or rental of housing or in advertising, provision of brokerage services, or lending; (ii) Promoting fair housing choice through the expansion of homeownership opportunities and improved quality of services for minorities, families with children, and persons with disabilities; or [[Page 9657]] (iii) Providing housing mobility counseling services. (6) For New Grants (14 points): For New Directions Grants (9 points). Result in the COPC function and activities becoming part of the urban mission of your institution and being funded in the future by sources other than HUD. In reviewing this subfactor, HUD will consider the extent to which: (a) COPC activities relate to your institution's urban mission; are part of a climate that rewards faculty work on these activities through promotion and tenure policies; benefit students because they are part of a service learning program at your institution (rather than just volunteer activities); and are reflected in your curriculum. HUD will look at your institution's commitment to faculty and staff continuing work in COPC neighborhoods or replicating successes in other neighborhoods and to your longer term commitment (e.g., five years after the start of the COPC) of hard dollars to COPC work. (b) You have received commitments for funding from sources outside the university for related COPC-like projects and activities in the targeted neighborhood or other distressed neighborhoods. Funding sources to be considered include, but are not limited to, local governments, neighborhood organizations, private businesses, and foundations. (7) For New Direction Grants only (5 points). Previous grantees have a wealth of knowledge that they can and should share with other institutions. If you send a faculty member of your team who has been listed in your application to participate in the peer review process for New Grants, you will receive 5 points . Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 Points) This factor addresses the ability of the applicant to secure community resources which can be combined with HUD's program resources to achieve program purposes. This factor measures the extent to which you have established partnerships with other entities to secure additional resources to increase the effectiveness of your proposed program activities. Resources may include funding or in-kind contributions, such as services or equipment, allocated to the purpose(s) of the award you are seeking. Resources may be provided by governmental entities, public or private nonprofit organizations, for- profit private organizations, or other entities willing to establish partnerships with you. You may also establish partnerships with funding recipients in other grant programs to coordinate the use of resources in the target area. In evaluating this factor, HUD will allocate points as follows: (1) Up to a total of 5 points will be awarded for a match that is 50% over the required match, as described in Section IV D above. The Department is concerned that applicants should be providing hard dollars as part of their matching contributions to enhance the tangible resources going into targeted neighborhoods. Thus, while indirect costs can count towards meeting the required match, they will not be used in calculating match overage. Only direct costs can count in this factor. (2) Up to an additional 5 points will be awarded for the extent to which you document that matching funds are provided from eligible sources other than your institution (e.g., funds from the city, including CDBG, other State or local government agencies, public or private organizations, or foundations). You must provide evidence of leveraging/partnerships by including in the application letters of firm commitment, memoranda of understanding, or agreements to participate from those entities identified as partners in the application. Each letter of commitment, memorandum of understanding, or agreement to participate should include the organization's name, proposed level of commitment and responsibilities as they relate to the proposed program. The commitment must also be signed by an official of the organization legally able to make commitments on behalf of the organization. Unless matching funds are accompanied by a commitment letter, they will not be counted towards the match. Rating Factor 5: Comprehensiveness and Coordination (10 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you coordinated your activities with other known organizations, participate or promote participation in your community's Consolidated Planning process, and are working towards addressing a need in a holistic and comprehensive manner through linkages with other activities in the community. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you have: (1) (4 points) Coordinated your proposed activities with those of other groups or organizations prior to submission in order to best complement, support and coordinate all known activities and, if funded, the specific steps you will take to share information on solutions and outcomes with others. Any written agreements, memoranda of understanding in place, or that will be in place after award should be described. (2) (3 points) Taken or will take specific steps to become active in the community's Consolidated Planning process (including the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice) established to identify and address a need/problem that is related to the activities the applicant proposes. (3) (3 points) Taken or will take specific steps to develop linkages to coordinate comprehensive solutions through meetings, information networks, planning processes or other mechanisms with: (a) Other HUD-funded projects/activities outside the scope of those covered by the Consolidated Plan; and (b) Other Federal, State or locally funded activities, including those proposed or on-going in the community. (C) Selections. In order to be funded under COPC, you must receive a minimum score of 70. HUD intends to fund at least one eligible applicant that serves colonias, as defined by section 916(d) of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act, as long as the applicant receives a minimum score of 70. If two or more applications have the same number of points, the application with the most points for Factor 3, Soundness of Approach, shall be selected. If there is still a tie, the application with the most points for Factor 4, Leveraging Resources shall be selected. HUD reserves the right to make selections out of rank order to provide for geographic distribution of funded COPCs. If HUD decides to use this option, it will do so only if two adjacent HUD regions do not yield at least one fundable COPC on the basis of rank order. If this occurs, HUD will fund the highest ranking applicant within the two regions as long as the minimum score of 70 points is achieved. After all applications have been rated and ranked and selections have been made, HUD may require you, if you are selected, to participate in negotiations to determine the specific terms of your Statement of Work and grant budget. In cases where HUD cannot successfully conclude negotiations, or you fail to provide HUD with requested information, an award will not be made. In such instances, HUD may elect to offer an award to the next highest ranking applicant, and proceed with negotiations with that applicant. After award but before grant execution, if you are selected, you will be required to provide a certification [[Page 9658]] from an Independent Public Accountant or the cognizant government auditor, stating that the financial management system employed by your institution meets proscribed standards for fund control and accountability required by OMB Circular A-133, Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations, or 24 CFR part 84, Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations, or the Federal Acquisition Regulations (for all other applicants). This information should contain the name and telephone number of the Independent Auditor, cognizant Federal auditor, or other audit agency, as applicable. VI. Application Submission Requirements You should include an original and two copies of the items listed below. In order to be able to recycle paper, please do not submit applications in bound form; binder clips or loose leaf binders are acceptable. Also, please, do not use colored paper. Please note the page limits for some of the items listed below and do not exceed them. In addition to the forms, certifications and assurances listed in Section II(G) of the General Section, your application must, at a minimum, contain the following items: (A) Transmittal Letter signed by the Chief Executive Officer of your institution or his or her designee. If a designee signs, your application must include the official delegation of signatory authority; (B) A Statement of Work (25 page limit) incorporating all activities to be funded in your application and details how your proposed work will be accomplished. Following a task-by-task format, the Statement of Work must: (1) Arrange the presentation of related major activities by project functional category (e.g., economic development, affordable housing, capacity building), summarize each activity, identify the primary persons involved in carrying out the activity, and delineate the major tasks involved in carrying it out. (2) Indicate the sequence in which the tasks are to be performed, noting areas of work which must be performed simultaneously. (3) Identify specific numbers of quantifiable intermediate and end products and objectives you will deliver by the end of the award agreement period as a result of the work performed. (C) Narrative statement addressing the Factors for Award in Section V (B). (25 page limit, including tables and maps, but not including letters of matching commitments). Your narrative response should be numbered in accordance with each factor and subfactor. Please do not repeat material in your Statements of Work or Need; instead focus on how you meet each factor. (D) Budget. Your budget presentation should be consistent with your Statement of Work and include: (1) Budget Form--The sample budget form included in the application kit should be used to prepare the budget. (2) A narrative explanation of how you arrived at your cost estimates, for any line item over $5,000. (3) A statement of your compliance with the 20% limitation on ``Planning and Administration'' Costs. (4) An explanation of your compliance with the requirement that not more than 25% of the total budget be allocated to research activities. (5) An explanation of your compliance with the matching requirements. More guidance on all of these items is included in the application kit. (E) Abstract. (1 page limit) An abstract describing the goals and activities of your program. VII. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. VIII. Environmental Requirements In accordance with 24 CFR 50.19(b) of the HUD regulations, activities assisted under this program are categorically excluded from the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act and are not subject to environmental review under the related laws and authorities. IX. Authority This program is authorized under the Community Outreach Partnership Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 5307 note; hereafter referred to as the ``COPC Act''). The COPC Act is contained in section 851 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (Pub.L. 102-550, approved October 28, 1992) (HCD Act of 1992). Section 801(c) of the HCD Act of 1992 authorizes $7.5 million for each year of the 5-year demonstration to create Community Outreach Partnership Centers as authorized in the COPC Act. The HUD, VA and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act of 1999 (Pub.L. 105-276, approved October 21, 1998) continued the program beyond the initial five-year demonstration by providing funding for it for FY 1999. BILLING CODE 4210-32-P [[Page 9659]] [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN26FE99.022 BILLING CODE 4210-32-C [[Page 9661]] Funding Availability for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Program Program Overview Purpose of the Program. To assist HBCUs expand their role and effectiveness in addressing community development needs in their localities, including neighborhood revitalization, housing, and economic development, consistent with the purposes of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended. Available Funds. Approximately $9 million. Eligible Applicants. Only HBCUs as determined by the Department of Education in 34 CFR 608.2 in accordance with that Department's responsibilities under Executive Order 12876, dated November 1, 1993, are eligible for funding under the HBCU Program. Application Deadline. June 9, 1999. Match: None Additional Information If you are interested in applying for funding under the HBCU program, please review carefully the General Section of this SuperNOFA and the following additional information. I. Application Due Date, Application Kits, Further Information, and Technical Assistance Application Due Date. Your completed application is due on or before 12:00 midnight, Eastern time on June 9, 1999, at HUD Headquarters with a copy to the appropriate HUD CPD Field Office. See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for specific procedures covering the form of application submission (e.g., mailed applications, express mail, overnight delivery, or hand carried). Address for Submitting Applications. Submit your original signed application and one copy to the following address: Processing and Control Branch, Office of Community Planning and Development, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Room 7251, Washington, DC, 20410. When submitting your application, please refer to the HBCU Program, and include your name, mailing address (including zip code) and telephone number (including area code). Copies of Applications to HUD Offices. To facilitate processing and review of your application, submit one copy to the Community Planning and Development (CPD) Director in the appropriate HUD Field Office for the HBCU. The list of HUD Field Offices is included in the application kit. HUD will accept only one application per HBCU. If HUD receives more than one application from a single HBCU, the application that was received earliest will be considered for funding. All others are ineligible. If HUD receives more than one application simultaneously from an HBCU then all applications will be considered ineligible for funding. You should take this policy into account to ensure that multiple applications are not submitted. For Application Kits. For an application kit and any supplemental information, you should call the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800- HUD-8929. If you have a hearing or speech impairment please call the Center's TTY number at 1-800-843-2209. When requesting an application kit, you should refer to the HBCU Program and provide your name, address (including zip code), and telephone number (including area code). You may also download the application on the Internet through the HUD web site at http://www.hud.gov. For Further Information. For answers to your questions, you have several options. You may call Ms. Delores Pruden, Historically Black Colleges and Universities Program, Office of Community Planning and Development, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh St, SW, Washington, DC 20410; telephone (202) 708-1590. (This is not a toll-free number.) If you have a hearing or speech impairment, you may access this number via TTY by calling the Federal Information Relay Service toll-free at 1-800-877-8339. You may also obtain information from the HUD Field Office located in your geographic area. The application kit contains the names, addresses and telephone numbers of the HUD Field Offices. For general information and information regarding training on this HBCU Program section of the SuperNOFA, you can call the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD-8929. II. Amount Allocated (A) In order to ensure that some previously unfunded HBCUs will receive awards in this competition, approximately one-fourth of the available funds will be awarded to HBCUs that have not previously been funded under the HUD HBCU program. (The FY 1991 competition was the first funded under the current HBCU Program authorization, section 107(b)(3) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974.) Therefore, of the $9 million in FY 1999 funds made available under this SuperNOFA for the HBCU Program: (1) Approximately $2,250,000 million will be awarded to HBCUs that have not received funding in past HUD HBCU competitions under section 107(b)(3) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended. This includes competitions for Fiscal Years 1991 through 1998 (``previously unfunded HBCUs''). Previously unfunded HBCUs are listed in Appendix A of this HBCU Program section of the SuperNOFA. (2) The remaining approximately $6,750,000 million of FY 1999 funds will be awarded to HBCUs that have received funding under such competitions (``previously funded HBCUs''). Previously funded HBCUs are listed in Appendix B of this HBCU Program section of the SuperNOFA. If recaptured funds are made available, those funds will also be divided proportionately between the two types of applicant funding pools; i.e. one fourth to previously unfunded HBCUs and three fourths to previously funded HBCUs. HUD reserves the right to make awards for less than the maximum amount or less than the amount requested in a particular application. Awards will be made in the form of grants. The maximum amount awarded to previously unfunded applicants will be $400,000 and the maximum amount awarded to previously funded applicants will be $500,000. (B) The maximum period for performance of your proposed program under this SuperNOFA for the HBCU Program is 24 months. The performance period will commence on the effective date of your grant agreement. III. Program Description; Eligible Applicants; Eligible Activities (A) Program Description. Approximately $9,000,000 is available in funding for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Program. The HBCU Program assists HBCUs expand their role and effectiveness in addressing community development needs in their localities, including neighborhood revitalization, housing, and economic development, consistent with the purposes of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended. (1) For the purposes of this program, the term ``locality'' includes any city, county, town, township, parish, village, or other general political subdivision of a State or the U.S. Virgin Islands within which an HBCU is located. (2) If your HBCU is located in a metropolitan statistical area (MSA), as established by the Office of Management and Budget, you may consider your [[Page 9662]] locality to be one or more of these entities within the entire MSA. The nature of the locality for each HBCU may differ, therefore, depending on its location. (3) A ``target area'' is the locality or the area within the locality in which your HBCU will implement its proposed HUD grant activities. (B) Eligible Applicants. Only HBCUs as determined by the Department of Education in 34 CFR 608.2 in accordance with that Department's responsibilities under Executive Order 12876, dated November 1, 1993, are eligible for funding under the HBCU Program. As indicated above, funds available under this program will be split between two classes of HBCU applicant, which will be rated, ranked, and selected separately. (1) The first category of eligible applicant, previously unfunded HBCUs, includes HBCUs that have not received funding under section 107(b)(3)13 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, which includes competitions for Fiscal Years 1991 through 1998. (2) The second category, previously-funded HBCUs, includes HBCUs that have received funding in past HUD HBCU competitions. Lists of previously unfunded HBCUs and previously funded HBCUs appear as Appendices A and B to the HBCU Program section of the SuperNOFA. HUD will use these lists to determine in which category your application should be considered. (C) Eligible Activities. (1) General. Each activity you propose for funding must meet both a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program national objective AND the CDBG eligibility requirements. Eligible activities that may be funded under the HBCU Program are those activities eligible for CDBG funding. The activities are listed in 24 CFR part 570, subpart C, particularly Secs. 570.201 through 570.206. Ineligible activities are listed at Sec. 570.207. If you propose an activity which otherwise is eligible it may not be funded if State or local law requires that it be carried out by a governmental entity. HUD will not fund specific proposed activities that do not meet eligibility requirements (see, particularly, 24 CFR part 570, subpart C), or that do not meet a national objective in accordance with 24 CFR 570.208. The CDBG Publication entitled ``Everything You Wanted to Know About CDBG'' discusses the regulations, and a copy can be ordered from HUD's SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD-8929. Each activity that may be funded under this SuperNOFA for the HBCU Program must meet one of the three national objectives of the Community Development Block Grant program which are: (a) Benefit to low- or moderate-income persons; (b) Aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight; or (c) Meet other community development needs having a particular urgency because existing conditions pose a serious and immediate threat to the health and welfare of the community, and other financial resources are not available to meet such needs. Criteria for determining whether an activity addresses one or more of these objectives are provided at 24 CFR 570.208. (It is not necessary for you to comply with the requirement that not less than 70% of the grant expenditures be for activities benefiting low and moderate income persons). (2) Examples of Eligible Activities. Examples of activities that generally can be carried out with these funds include, but are not limited to: (a) Acquisition of real property; (b) Clearance and demolition; (c) Rehabilitation of residential structures to increase housing opportunities for low- and moderate-income persons and rehabilitation of commercial or industrial buildings to correct code violations or for certain other purposes; e.g., making accessibility and visitability modifications to housing. If you are proposing to undertake this activity, you will be required to provide reasonable estimates, from a qualified entity other than your university, of the cost to complete projects. Such an entity must be involved in the business of housing rehabilitation, construction and/or management; (d) Direct homeownership assistance to low- and moderate-income persons, as provided in section 105(a)(25) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; (e) Acquisition, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, or installation of public facilities and improvements, such as water and sewer facilities and streets. If you are proposing to undertake this activity, you will be required to provide reasonable estimates, from a qualified entity other than you, of the cost to complete projects. Such an entity must be involved in the business of housing rehabilitation, construction and/or management; (f) Special economic development activities described at 24 CFR 570.203; (g) Eligible public service activities, including activities that provide a continuum of care for the homeless; adult basic education classes; GED preparation and testing; HBCU curriculum development of courses which will lead to a certificate or degree in community planning and development; job and career counseling and assessment; citizen participation academies, and public access telecommunications centers including ``Campus of Learners'' (COL) and ``Neighborhood Networks'' (NN); social and medical services; fair housing services designed to further the fair housing objectives of the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-20) by making all persons, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, family status and/or disability aware of the range of housing opportunities available to them; and/ or other support activities for low- and moderate-income residents, senior citizens and youth, including the U.S. Department of Education's Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP). (For more information regarding GEAR UP, call 1-800-USA-LEARN or visit the Department of Education's website at www.ed.gov); (h) Assistance to facilitate economic development by providing technical or financial assistance for the establishment, stabilization, and expansion of microenterprises, including minority enterprises; (i) Establishment of a Community Development Corporation (CDC) to undertake eligible activities; (j) Assistance to a community based development organization (CBDO) to carry out a CDBG neighborhood revitalization, community economic development, or energy conservation project, in accordance with 24 CFR 570.204. This could include activities in support of a HUD approved local CDBG Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy (NRS) or HUD approved State CDBG Community Revitalization Strategy (CRS). If you are proposing a Community Development Corporation (CDC) component, it may qualify for CBDO activities; and (k) Program administration costs related to the planning and execution of community development activities assisted in whole or in part with grant funds. In order to enhance the capacity of HBCUs eligible under this SuperNOFA, you may propose to use up to 10% of the award funds to acquire technical assistance (TA) from a qualified TA provider to assist you in implementing your proposed activities. While you are responsible for ensuring that potential TA providers are qualified, we would expect that the most qualified providers would be [[Page 9663]] entities/organizations that have demonstrated the expertise and capacity to successfully conceptualize, develop and implement community and economic development projects and initiatives similar to those you propose. Previously unfunded HBCUs are particularly encouraged to consider acquiring technical assistance from a qualified HBCU TA provider, as described in the paragraph below entitled ``Partnering With A Qualified HBCU Technical Assistance (TA) Provider.'' (3) Activities Designed to Promote Training and Employment Opportunities. In selecting proposed eligible activities, we urge you to consider undertaking activities designed to promote opportunities for training and employment of low-income residents in connection with HUD initiatives such as ``Campus of Learners'' (COL) in public housing and ``Neighborhood Networks'' (NN) in other Federally-assisted or insured housing. We also encourage you, whenever feasible, to propose implementing activities in a Federally-designated Urban or Rural (HUD or Department of Agriculture) Empowerment Zone, Urban or Rural Enterprise Community (EZ or EC), or a HUD-approved local CDBG Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area or HUD-approved State CDBG Community Revitalization Strategy Area. (4) Use of Grant Funds for Acquisition of Computer Hardware and Software. We encourage you to propose the use of grant funds, at reasonable levels, for the acquisition of computer hardware and software compatible with Internet access and HUD's Community Planning 2020 Software, if you do not currently have such capability. You may obtain more information on the Community 2020 Software from your local HUD Community Planning and Development Office. (5) Use of Grant Funds for the Provision of Public Services. If you plan to use grant funds to provide public services, you are bound by the statutory requirement that not more than 15% of the total grant amount be used for public service activities. Therefore, you must propose to use at least 85% of the grant amount for activities qualifying under an eligibility category other than public services (as described at 24 CFR 570.201(e)). While HUD encourages HBCUs to use a portion of their grant funds for curriculum development of courses that would lead to a certificate or degree in community planning and development, this activity is considered a public service and subject to the public service cap of 15%. (6) Partnering With A Qualified HBCU Technical Assistance (TA) Provider. In order to foster further partnerships between HBCUs, you are encouraged to propose using a portion of the award funds to acquire technical assistance from a qualified HBCU to assist you to develop and implement the proposed activities. The cost for the technical assistance must be for post award assistance and must be deemed by HUD as necessary and reasonable for the purposes of the grant. Under no circumstances may an applicant use more than 10 percent of the total HUD grant (not including matching funds, if any) to purchase technical assistance. While you are responsible for ensuring that potential TA providers are qualified, we would expect that the most qualified HBCU TA providers would be previously funded HBCUs that have demonstrated the expertise and capacity to successfully conceptualize, develop and implement community and economic development projects and initiatives, particularly by successfully carrying out activities funded under the HUD HBCU Program. IV. Program Requirements In addition to the program requirements listed in the General Section of this SuperNOFA, you are subject to the following requirements: (A) Leveraging Although a match is not required to qualify for funding, if you claim a match, you must provide letters or other documentation evidencing the extent and firmness of commitments of a match from other Federal (e.g., Americorps Programs), State, local, and/or private sources (including the applicant's own resources). These letters or documents must be dated no earlier than the date of this published SuperNOFA. If you have evidence in support of the proposed match commitment, then you are eligible for more rating points than those applicants not having a firm commitment for a match. Potential Sources of Assistance State and local governments. Housing Authorities. Local or national nonprofit organizations. Banks and private businesses. Foundations. Faith Communities. Documentation Requirements For each match, cash or in kind, you must submit a letter from the provider on the provider's letterhead. Number each letter as a page in your application. For each match, include a letter from the provider that addresses the following: The dollar amount or dollar value of the in-kind goods and/or services committed. For each cash match, the dollar amount in the commitment letter must be consistent with the dollar amount you indicated on the Standard Form (SF) 424 and in the Budget-By-Task; How the match is to be used; The date the match will be made available and a statement that it will be for the duration of the grant period; Any terms and conditions affecting the commitment, other than receipt of a HUD HBCU Grant; and The signature of the appropriate executive officer authorized to commit the funds and/or goods and/or services. (See the application kit for a sample commitment letter.) (B) Forms, Certifications and Assurances The following forms, certifications and assurances are required to be submitted with your application: (1) Standard Form (SF) 424 Application for Federal Assistance; (2) Standard Form (SF) 424 B for Non-Construction Programs; (3) Applicant Certification; (4) Certification of Consistency with the Local Consolidated Plan; and (5) Letter Certifying Local Approval. (6) Certification Form for EZ/EC bonus points. These bonus points will only be awarded when the HBCU is located within the geographic boundaries of a high performing EZ/EC. (C) Employment of Local Area Residents (Section 3) Please see Section II(E) of the General Section of this SuperNOFA. The requirements are applicable to certain activities that may be funded under this program section of the SuperNOFA. V. Application Selection Process (A) Rating and Ranking (1) Threshold Review. HUD will conduct a review to insure that applications are complete and consistent with the General Section of the SuperNOFA, this HBCU Program section of the SuperNOFA and the HBCU Program regulations (24 CFR 570.404) before reviewing the application for rating and ranking. The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. (2) Funding of Applications. To be considered for funding, your application [[Page 9664]] must receive a minimum score of 70 out of the possible total of 100 points possible for Factors 1 through 5. In addition, two bonus points may be awarded for EZ/EC, as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Within each category of eligible applicant, HUD will fund applications in rank order, until it has awarded all available funds for that category of applicant, or until there are no fundable applications remaining in that category. If there is a tie in the point scores of two applications, the rank order will be determined by the score on Factor 3, 4, 2, 1, 5 in that order. HUD will give the higher rank to the application with the most points for a factor in the above order. At whichever factor one of the applicants has the higher score, the tie will be broken, and no other scores will be considered for the purpose of breaking the tie. If funds remain after approving all fundable applications within a category of applicants, HUD may choose to add those funds to the funds available for the other category of applicants. (3) After Selection. After selection, but prior to grant award, you will be required to: (a) Negotiate. After HUD has rated and ranked all applications and HUD has selected the competition winners, HUD requires that all winners participate in negotiations to determine the specific terms of the Statement of Work and the grant budget. HUD will follow the negotiation procedures described in Section III(D) of the General Section of the SuperNOFA. (b) Provide Financial Management and Audit Information. If you are selected for funding, you will be required to submit a certification from an Independent Public Accountant, or the cognizant government auditor, stating that the financial management system employed by you meets prescribed standards for fund control and accountability required by OMB Circular A-133, as codified at 24 CFR part 84. (B) Factors for Award Used To Evaluate and Rate Applications HUD will use the Factors For Award set forth below to evaluate applications. Your application must contain sufficient information for HUD to review it for its merits. The score for each factor will be based on the qualitative and quantitative aspects of your response to that factor. You may use up to a total of twenty-five (25) pages to respond to Factor 1 through 5. This limitation applies to your narrative response, tables, and maps, and NOT to firm commitment letters, the performance narrative and progress reports for previously- funded HBCUs. Please note that this page limitation is different from last year's in that (1) the page limitation has been decreased and (2) tables and maps are included in the limitation. The maximum number of points that may be awarded is 102. This includes two EZ/EC bonus points, as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (15 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have the organizational resources necessary to successfully implement your proposed activities in a timely manner. In rating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which: (1) (10 points) Your application demonstrates the knowledge and experience of the overall project director and staff, including the day-to-day program manager, consultants (including TA providers) and contractors in planning and managing the kinds of programs for which funding is being requested. Experience will be judged in terms of recent, relevant and successful experience of your staff to undertake eligible program activities. In rating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which your organization and staff have recent, relevant, and successful experience in: (a) Undertaking specific successful community development projects with community-based organizations or local governments; and (b) Providing proven leadership in solving community problems which have a direct bearing on the proposed activity. (c) Also, for previously funded HBCUs, the extent to which you have been successful with past HUD/HBCU projects. For each HUD HBCU grant, you must submit a performance narrative, as outlined in the application package, and copies of the last two progress reports. HUD will consider your performance, including meeting established target dates and schedules, in applying the rating for this subfactor. (2) (5 points) You propose to partner with a qualified HBCU technical assistance (TA) provider to receive technical assistance. Qualified HBCUs that will provide the technical assistance to other HBCUs responding to this SuperNOFA can also be awarded five (5) points for this subfactor. Whether you are a TA recipient or a TA provider, you must (a) name the other party to the TA assistance; (b) describe the technical assistance to be provided; (c) state the costs of the technical assistance; (d) state the duration of the technical assistance; and (e) state the expected results of the technical assistance. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (15 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for funding your proposed program activities and an indication of the importance of meeting the need in the target area. In responding to this factor, you will be evaluated on the extent to which you document the level of need for the proposed activities and the importance of meeting the need. You should use statistics and analyses contained in a data source(s) that: (a) Are sound and reliable. To the extent that your community's Consolidated Plan and Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI) identify the level of the problem and the urgency in meeting the need, you should include references to these documents in your response to this factor. The Department will view your application more favorably if you have used these documents to identify need. If your proposed activities are not covered under the scope of the Consolidated Plan and AI, you should indicate such, and use other sound data sources to identify the level of need and the urgency in meeting the need. Types of other sources include, but are not limited to, Census reports, HUD's Continuum of Care gaps analysis, law enforcement agency crime reports, Public Housing Authorities' Comprehensive Plan, community needs analysis such as provided by the United Way, local Urban League, the HBCU and other sound and reliable sources appropriate for the HBCU program. You also may address needs in terms of fulfilling court orders or consent decrees, settlements, conciliation agreements, and voluntary compliance agreements. (b) To the extent possible, the data you use should be specific to the area where the proposed activities will be carried out. You should document needs as they apply to the area where the activities will be targeted, rather than the entire locality or State, unless the target area is the entire locality or State. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (50 Points) This factor addresses the quality and cost-effectiveness of your proposed work plan. There must be a clear relationship between the proposed activities, the community's needs and [[Page 9665]] the purpose of the HUD HBCU Program for you to receive points for this factor. HUD will consider the effectiveness/impact and feasibility of your work plan in addressing the needs described in your response to Factor 2 (Needs) including the extent to which you will provide geographic coverage for the target area. (1) Quality of the Work Plan (35 Points). Your work plan must incorporate all proposed activities, describing in detail how your activities will alleviate and/or fulfill the needs identified in Factor 2, including how your activities will benefit low-income and elderly residents, welfare recipients, and the working poor in the target area to be served, and how your activities will be implemented. If relocation is to be a part of your work activities, you should discuss your plan for temporary or permanent relocation of occupants of units affected, including storage or moving of household goods, stipends and/ or incentives. Your work plan must delineate tasks and subtasks for each activity, and indicate the sequence in which the tasks are to be performed, noting areas of work which must be performed simultaneously. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider: (a) Specific Services or Activities. (20 points) The extent to which your proposed work program identifies the specific services or activities to be performed. In reviewing this subfactor, HUD will consider the extent to which: (i) Your proposal outlines a clear agenda based on a thorough familiarity with existing work/activities in the target area. You should demonstrate that your proposed activities do not duplicate work/ activities previously completed or work/activities currently underway by others and that they meet a CDBG national objective and are eligible activities under the CDBG program; (ii) You demonstrate how the activities will fit into and strengthen your role in addressing community development needs in the targeted locality, and how the proposed project will potentially yield innovative strategies or ``best practices'' that can be duplicated and disseminated to other organizations; and (iii) Your plan outlines a clear agenda for citizen involvement in the planning and implementation. HUD will look at the extent to which: Local community representatives are involved and reflect a balance of race, ethnic, disability, gender and income of the residents of the community to be served, or will be involved to address the needs identified in Factor 2; Evidence is provided that neighborhood organizations and local government entities were invited to, or participated in, the identification of activities to be undertaken; and The methods you used for outreach to the community during the development of your application and propose to use for the implementation of the proposed project will be effective. (b) Feasibility of Success and Timely Delivery of Products and Implementation. (10 points) In evaluating this subfactor, HUD will consider the extent to which your proposed activities will achieve the purposes of the program within the grant period, and the extent to which your schedule represents an efficient and feasible plan for implementation of your proposed activities. You should identify measurable objectives to be accomplished during the period of performance e.g., the number of persons to be trained, number of persons to be employed, number of houses to be built (pursuant to 24 CFR 570.207) or rehabilitated, number of minority owned businesses to be started, etc.; the proposed short and long term program objectives to be achieved as a result of your proposed activities; the tangible and measurable impacts your work program will have on the community in general and the target area or population in particular; and the relationship of your proposed activities to other on-going or proposed efforts to improve the economic, social, or living environment in the target area. Your work plan must describe the timing of all activities you will undertake and complete under your grant. You should describe the products you will deliver in 6 month intervals, up to 24 months and indicate which staff described in your response to Factor 1 will be responsible and accountable for the deliverables. (c) HUD Priorities. (5 points) The extent to which your proposed application will further and support the policy priorities of HUD including: (i) Promoting healthy homes; (ii) Enhancing on-going efforts to eliminate drugs and crime from neighborhoods through program policy efforts such as ``one Strike and You Are Out'' or the ``Officer Next Door'' initiative; and (iii) Providing educational, job training, and homeownership opportunities through such initiatives as Neighborhood Networks and Campus of Learners, and linking programs to Americorps activities. The Healthy Homes initiative implements a series of initiatives to protect children from home hazards such as lead-based paint, radon, fires and accidents around the home. The Neighborhood Networks (NN) initiative enhances the self- sufficiency, employability, and economic self-reliance of low-income families and the elderly living in HUD-insured and HUD-assisted properties by providing such residents with on-site access to computer and training resources. The Campus of Learners (COL) initiative is designed to transform public housing into safe and livable communities where families undertake training in new telecommunications and computer technology and partake in educational opportunities and job training initiatives. (2) Institutionalization of Project Activities (10 Points). The extent to which your project will result in the kinds of activities being proposed sustained by becoming part of the mission of your institution. HUD will look at your commitment to continuing to work in the target area or other similar areas and to your longer term commitment of hard dollars to similar work. (3) Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (5 Points). Activities to affirmatively further fair housing, for example: (a) Overcoming impediments to fair housing, such as discrimination in the sale or rental of housing or in advertising, provision of brokerage services, or lending; (b) Promoting fair housing through the expansion of homeownership opportunities and improved quality of services for minorities, families with children, and persons with disabilities; or (c) providing mobility counseling. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 Points) This factor addresses your ability to secure community resources which can be combined with HUD program funds to assist HBCUs expand their role and effectiveness in addressing community development needs in their localities, including neighborhood revitalization, housing, and economic development. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you have established partnerships with other entities to secure additional resources to increase the effectiveness of your proposed activities. Resources may include funding or in-kind contributions, such as services or equipment, allocated solely to the purpose(s) of the award you are seeking. [[Page 9666]] Resources may be provided by governmental entities, public or private nonprofit organizations, for-profit private organizations, or other entities. You may also establish partnerships with other program funding recipients to coordinate the use of resources in the target area. You must provide letters or other documentation evidencing the extent and firmness of commitments of a match from other Federal (e.g., Americorps Programs), State, local, and/or private sources (including your own resources). These commitment letters or documents must be dated no earlier than the date of this published SuperNOFA. If you have evidence in support of your proposed match commitment, you are eligible for more rating points than applicants who do not have a firm commitment for a match. The maximum number of rating points you can receive for leveraging is 10 points. HUD will award a higher number of points for a CASH match than in-kind goods or services of the same value. To be recognized as leveraging, contributions must be made available for performance of pertinent grant activity(ies). If you do not have evidence of leveraging, you will receive zero (0) points for this Factor. Rating Factor 5: Comprehensiveness and Coordination (10 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have coordinated your activities with other known organizations, participate or promote participation in your community's Consolidated Planning process, and are working towards addressing a need in a holistic and comprehensive manner through linkages with other activities in the community. For specific information about your locality's planning process, contact the local or State Community Development Agency or the local HUD Field Office. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you demonstrate you have: (1) (4 points) Coordinated your proposed activities with those of other groups or organizations before submission in order to best complement, support and coordinate all known activities, and if funded, the specific steps you will take to share information on solutions and outcomes with others. You should describe any written agreements, memoranda of understanding in place, or that will be in place after award. (2) (3 points) Taken or will take specific steps to become active in the community's Consolidated Planning process (including the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice) established to identify and address a need/problem that is related to your proposed activities. (3) (3 points) Taken or will take specific steps to develop linkages to coordinate comprehensive solutions through meetings, information networks, planning processes or other mechanisms with: (a) Other HUD-funded projects/activities outside the scope of those covered by the Consolidated Plan; and (b) Other Federal, State or locally funded activities, including those proposed or on-going in the community. VI. Application Submission Requirements You must complete and submit your application for an HBCU grant in accordance with instructions contained in the University and College Programs Application Kit for 1999. The application kit will request information in sufficient detail for HUD to determine whether your proposed activities are feasible and meet all the requirements of applicable statutes, regulations, and this SuperNOFA for the HBCU Program. Following is a list of items required for your HBCU application: (A) Transmittal Letter. A transmittal letter must accompany your application. Your cover letter must be signed by the Chief Executive Officer (usually the President or Provost) of your institution. If the Chief Executive Officer has delegated this responsibility to another official, that person may sign, but a copy of the delegation must also be included. (B) Application Checklist. (C) Abstract/Executive Summary (one page limit) describing the goals and activities of your project. (D) Budget Document The budget presentation must be consistent with the Work Plan and the Standard Form (SF) 424. Your budget submission must include: (1) a budget summary covering the Federal and non-Federal share of the costs proposed by cost category. You should pay particular attention to accurately estimating costs, determining the necessity for and reasonableness of costs; and correctly computing all budget items and totals. Indirect costs must be substantiated and approved by the cognizant Federal agency or you must provide an indirect cost rate plan. The indirect cost rate should be indicated in your budget; (2) a budget justification, which should be a narrative statement indicating how you arrived at your costs. When possible, you should use quotes from vendors or historical data. You must support all direct labor and salaries with mandated city/state pay scales or other documentation; and (3) a budget-by-task which includes a listing of tasks to be completed for each activity needed to implement the program, the overall costs for each task, and the cost for each funding source. You must submit reasonable cost estimates supplied by a qualified entity other than yourself if you are proposing to do any of the following: rehabilitation of residential, commercial and/or industrial structures; and/or acquisition, construction, or installation of public facilities and improvements. The supplier of cost estimates must be involved in the business of housing rehabilitation, construction and/or management. You may obtain guidance for securing these estimates from the CPD Director in the HUD field office or the local government. A format for the budget summary and the budget-by-task is included in the application kit. (E) Narrative Statement Responding To The Factors For Award (25 page limit, including tables and maps, but not including firm commitment letters, the performance narrative and progress reports). The narrative should be numbered in accordance with each factor and subfactor. (F) Certifications. All certification forms must be signed by the Chief Executive Officer of your organization. HUD will not consider appendices to an application. You must submit your documentation, including firm commitment letters, the performance narrative and progress reports, with your responses to the pertinent factors in order to receive points for it. VII. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. VIII. Environmental Review If you propose activities (such as physical development activities) that are not excluded from environmental review under 24 CFR 50.19(b), an environmental review by HUD staff is required in accordance with 24 CFR part 50, as indicated by 24 CFR 570.404(i), before HUD approves the proposal (i.e., releases CDBG funds). Before any HUD grant funds are released, environmental approval must be secured. If the requirements of part 50 are not met, HUD reserves the right to terminate all or portions of the award. You are not authorized to proceed with any activity requiring approval until written approval is received from the appropriate HUD Field Environmental Clearance Officer in your area certifying [[Page 9667]] that the project has been approved and released from all environmental conditions. IX. Authority This program is authorized under section 107(b)(3) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (the 1974 Act) (42 U.S.C. 5307(b)(3)), which was added by section 105 of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform Act of 1989 (Pub.L. 101-235). The HBCU Program is governed by regulations contained in 24 CFR 570.400 and 570.404, and in 24 CFR part 570, subparts A, C, J, K, and O. HBCU Program Appendix A Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Previously Unfunded By HUD During Fiscal Years 1991-1998) Alabama Bishop State Community College Concordia College Fredd State Technical College Lawson State Community College Miles College Selma University J.F. Drake Technical College Trenholm State Technical College Arkansas Shorter College Delaware Delaware State University Florida Bethune-Cookman College Edward Waters College Florida Memorial College Georgia Morehouse College Morehouse School of Medicine Paine College Louisiana Dillard University Southern University at Shreveport/Bossier City Maryland University Of Maryland Eastern Shore Michigan Lewis College of Business Mississippi Hinds Community College Mary Holmes College North Carolina Barber-Scotia College Livingstone College Ohio Wilberforce University Pennsylvania Cheyney University of Pennsylvania South Carolina Allen University Clinton Junior College Denmark Technical College Morris College Tennessee Knoxville College Lane College Meharry Medical College Tennessee State University Texas Jarvis Christian College Southwestern Christian College Texas College Virginia Virginia Union University West Virginia Bluefield State College West Virginia State University U.S. Virgin Islands University of the Virgin Islands HBCU Program Appendix B Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Previously Funded By HUD During Fiscal Years 1991-1998) Alabama Alabama A&M University Alabama State University Gadsden State Community College Oakwood College Stillman College Talladega College Tuskegee University Arkansas Arkansas Baptist College Philander Smith College University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff District of Columbia Howard University University of the District of Columbia Florida Florida A&M University Georgia Albany State University Clark Atlanta University Fort Valley State University Interdenominational Theological Center Morris Brown College Savannah State University Spelman College Kentucky Kentucky State University Louisiana Grambling State University Southern University A & M College System at Baton Rouge Southern University at New Orleans Xavier University of New Orleans Maryland Bowie State University Coppin State College Morgan State University Mississippi Alcorn State University Coahoma Community College Jackson State University Mississippi Valley State University Rust College Tougaloo College Missouri Harris-Stowe State College Lincoln University North Carolina Bennett College Elizabeth City State University Fayetteville State University Johnson C. Smith University North Carolina A&T State University North Carolina Central University St. Augustine's College Shaw University Winston-Salem State University Ohio Central State University Oklahoma Langston University Pennsylvania Lincoln University South Carolina Benedict College Claflin College South Carolina State University Voorhees College Tennessee Fisk University Lemoyne-Owen College Texas Huston-Tillotson College Paul Quinn College Prairie View A&M University Saint Philip's College Texas Southern University Wiley College Virginia Hampton University Norfolk State University Saint Paul's College Virginia State University BILLING CODE 4210-32-P [[Page 9669]] [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN26FE99.023 BILLING CODE 4210-32-C [[Page 9671]] Funding Availability for the Hispanic-Serving Institutions Assisting Communities Program Program Overview Purpose of the Program. To assist Hispanic-serving institutions of higher education (HSIs) expand their role and effectiveness in addressing community development needs in their localities, consistent with the purposes of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended. Available Funds. Approximately $5.65 million. Eligible Applicants: Only nonprofit Hispanic-serving institutions of higher education that meet the definition of an HSI established in Title V of the 1998 Amendments to the Higher Education Act of 1965 (Pub. L. 105-244; enacted October 7, 1998). Application Deadline. June 9, 1999. Match. None. Additional Information: If you are interested in applying for funds under the HSIAC Program, please review carefully the General Section of this SuperNOFA and the following additional information. I. Application Due Date, Application Kits, Further Information, and Technical Assistance Application Due Date. Your completed application is due on or before 12:00 midnight, Eastern Time on June 9, 1999 at HUD Headquarters. See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for specific procedures covering the form of the application submission (e.g., mailed applications, express mail, overnight delivery, or hand carried). Address for Submitting Applications. Submit your original signed application and two copies to the following address: Processing and Control Branch, Office of Community Planning and Development, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Room 7251, Washington, DC, 20410. When submitting your application, please refer to HSIAC and include your name, mailing address (including zip code) and telephone number (including area code). HUD will accept only one application per HSI for this program. If your institution submits more than one application, all of your applications for HSIAC will be disqualified. You should take this policy into account and take steps to ensure that multiple applications are not submitted. For Application Kits. For an application kit and any supplemental information, you should call the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800- HUD-8929. If you have a hearing or speech impairment, please call the Center's TTY number at 1-800-843-2209. When requesting an application kit, you should refer to HSIAC Program and provide your name and address (including zip code) and telephone number (including area code). You may also access the application on the Internet through the HUD web site at www.hud.gov. For Further Information and Technical Assistance. For answers to your questions, you have several options. You may call Jane Karadbil of HUD's Office of University Partnerships at 202-708-1537, extension 5918. If you have a hearing or speech impairment, you may access this number via TTY by calling the Federal Information Relay Service toll- free at 1-800-877-8339. You may also write to Ms. Karadbil via email at Jane__R.__Karadbil@HUD.Gov. There will be an information broadcast via satellite so that you can learn more about this program and how to prepare an application. For more information about the date and time of this broadcast, you should consult the HUD web site. II. Amount Allocated Approximately $5.65 million in FY 1999 funds is being made available under this SuperNOFA for HSIAC. The maximum grant period is 24 months. The performance period will commence on the effective date of the grant agreement. The maximum amount request and amount to be awarded is $400,000. Since the Statement of Work and other facets of the technical review are assessed in the context of the proposed budget and grant request, and in the interest of fairness to all applicants, if you submit an application requesting more than $400,000 in HUD funds, it will be ruled ineligible. HUD reserves the right to make awards for less than the maximum amount or less than the amount requested in your application. III. Program Description; Eligible Applicants; Eligible Activities (A) Program Description. The purpose of HSIAC is to assist HSIs expand their role and effectiveness in addressing community development needs in their localities, including neighborhood revitalization, housing, and economic development. (1) For the purposes of this program, the term ``locality'' includes any city, county. Township, parish, village, or other general political subdivision of a State, Puerto Rico, or the U.S. Virgin Islands within which your HSI is located. (2) If your HSI is located in a metropolitan statistical area (MSA), as established by the Office of Management and Budget, you may consider your locality to be one or more of these entities within the entire MSA. The nature of the locality for each HSI may differ, therefore, depending on its location. (3) A ``target area'' is the locality or the area within the locality in which your institution will implement its proposed HUD grant. (B) Eligible Applicants. Only if your institution is a nonprofit institution of higher education and meets the statutory definition of an HSI in Title V of the 1998 Amendments to the Higher Education Act of 1965 (P.L. 105-244) are you eligible to apply. In order for you to meet this definition, at least 25 percent of the full-time undergraduate students enrolled in your institution must be Hispanic and not less than 50 percent of these Hispanic students must be low-income individuals. You are not required to be on the list of eligible institutions prepared by the U.S. Department of Education. However, if you are not, you will be required to certify in the application that you meet the statutory definition. (C) Eligible Activities. (1) General. Each activity you propose for funding must meet both a Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) national objective and the CDBG eligibility requirements. A discussion of the national objectives can be found at 24 CFR part 570.208. There are three national objectives: (a) Benefit to low- and moderate-income persons; (b) Aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight; or (c) Meet other community development needs having a particular urgency because existing conditions pose a serious and immediate threat to the health and welfare of the community, and other financial resources are not available to meet such needs. (It is not necessary for you to comply with the requirement that not less than 70% of the grant expenditures be for activities benefiting low- and moderate-income persons.) You can find the regulations governing activities eligible under the CDBG program at 24 CFR part 570, subpart C, particularly Secs. 570.201 through 570.206. Ineligible activities are listed at Sec. 570.207. The CDBG publication entitled ``Everything You Wanted to Know About CDBG'' [[Page 9672]] discusses the regulations. You can obtain a copy from the SuperNOFA Information Center. If you propose an activity which otherwise is eligible, it may not be funded if State or local law requires that it be carried out by a governmental entity. In addition, you may not propose the construction or rehabilitation of your own facilities unless you can demonstrate that such activities would meet the purpose of this program to expand the role and effectiveness of an HSI in its locality. HUD will scrutinize proposed activities for eligibility. As examples of eligible and ineligible on- campus activities, rehabilitating a library for use by your students would not be an eligible activity, but rehabilitating it to convert it to a micro-business enterprise center for the community would be. (2) Examples of Eligible Activities. Examples of activities that generally can be carried out with these funds, under one of the three national objectives, include, but are not limited to: (a) Acquisition of real property; (b) Clearance and demolition; (c) Rehabilitation of residential structures to increase housing opportunities for low- and moderate-income persons and rehabilitation of commercial or industrial buildings to correct code violations or for certain other purposes, e.g., making accessibility and visitability modifications to housing; (d) Direct homeownership assistance to low- and moderate-income persons, as provided in section 105(a)(25) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; (e) Acquisition, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, or installation of public facilities and improvements, such as water and sewer facilities and streets; (f) Special economic development activities described at 24 CFR 570.203; (g) Up to 15 percent of the grant for eligible public services activities including: (i) Work study programs that meet the program requirements of the Hispanic-serving Institutions Work Study program, which can be found at 24 CFR 570.416; (ii) Outreach and other program activities as described in the Community Outreach Partnership Centers Program section of the SuperNOFA; (iii) Educational activities including English as a Second Language (ESL) classes, adult basic education classes, GED preparation and testing, and curriculum development of courses that will lead to a certificate or degree in community planning and development; (iv) Job and career counseling and assessment and other activities designed to promote employment opportunities; (v) Capacity building for community organizations; (vi) Social and medical services for youths, adults, senior citizens, and the homeless; (vii) Fair housing services designed to further the fair housing objectives of the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601-20) by making all persons, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, familial status and/or disability aware of the range of housing opportunities available to them; (viii) Day care services and costs for the children of students attending your institution; (ix) Continuum of care services for the homeless; (x) Public access telecommunications centers including ``Campus of Learners'' and ``Neighborhood Networks;'' (xi) Services to assist low-income students to attend college, as part of the U.S. Department of Education's Gaining Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program (GEAR UP). (For more information, call 1-800-USA-LEARN or visit the Department of Education's website at www.ed.gov). (h) Assistance to facilitate economic development by providing technical assistance or financial assistance for the establishment, stabilization, and expansion of microenterprises, including minority enterprises. (i) Establishment of a Community Development Corporation (CDC) at the institution to undertake eligible activities; (j) Assistance to community-based development organizations (CBDO) to carry out a CDBG neighborhood revitalization, community economic development, or energy conservation project, in accordance with 24 CFR 570.204. This could include activities in support of a HUD approved local CDBG Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy (NRS) or HUD approved State CDBG Community Revitalization Strategy (CRS). If you are proposing a Community Development Corporation (CDC) component, it may qualify for CBDO activities; (k) Activities designed to promote training and employment opportunities; (l) Up to 20% of your grant for program administration costs related to the planning and execution of community development activities assisted in whole or in part with grant funds. Pre-award planning costs may not be paid out of grant funds. (3) Use of Grant Funds for Acquisition of Computer Hardware and Software. HUD encourages you to propose the use of grant funds, at reasonable levels, for the acquisition of computer hardware and software compatible with Internet access and HUD's Community Planning 2020 Software, if you do not currently have such capability. You may obtain more information on the Community 2020 Software from the local HUD Community Planning and Development Office. (D) Other Requirements. (1) Leveraging. Although a match is not required to qualify for funding, if you claim a match, you must provide letters or other documentation evidencing the extent and firmness of commitments of a match from other Federal (e.g., Americorps Programs), State, local, and/or private sources (including the applicant's own resources). These letters or documents must be dated no earlier than the date of this published SuperNOFA. Potential Sources of Assistance State and local governments. Housing Authorities. Local or national nonprofit organizations. Banks and private businesses. Foundations. Faith Communities. Documentation Requirements For each match, cash or in kind, you must submit a letter from the provider on the provider's letterhead. Number each letter as a page in the application. For each match, include a letter from the provider that addresses the following: The dollar amount or dollar value of the in-kind goods and/or services committed. For each cash match, the dollar amount in the commitment letter must be consistent with the dollar amount you indicated on the SF-424 and in the Budget; How the match is to be used; The date the match will be made available and a statement that it will be for the duration of the grant period; Any terms and conditions affecting the commitment, other than receipt of a HUD HSIAC Grant; and The signature of the appropriate executive officer authorized to commit the funds and/or goods and/or services. (See the application kit for a sample commitment letter.) (2) Employment of local area residents (Section 3). Please see Section II(E) of the General Section of this SuperNOFA. The requirements are applicable to certain activities that may be funded under this program section of the SuperNOFA. [[Continued on page 9667]] [Federal Register: February 26, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 38)] [Notices.] [Page 9667-9716] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] [DOCID:fr26fe99-122] [[pp. 9667-9716]] Super Notice of Funding Availability (SuperNOFA) for HUD's Housing, Community Development and Empowerment Programs [[Continued from page 9666]] [[Page 9673]] (3) Labor Standards. If you are awarded a grant, you must comply with the labor standards as found at 24 CFR 570.6603. (4) OMB Circulars. Your grant will be governed by the provisions of 24 CFR part 84 (Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and other Nonprofit Organizations), A-21 (Cost Principles for Education Institutions, and A-133 (Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations. You may not spend more than 20% of your grant on planning or administrative costs. The application kit contains a detailed explanation of what these costs are. You can access the OMB circulars at the White House website at http://whitehouse.gov/WH/EOP/OMB/html/circulars. IV. Application Selection Process HUD will conduct two types of review: a threshold review to determine applicant eligibility; and a technical review to rate the application based on the rating factors in this section. (A) Threshold Factors for Funding Consideration Under this threshold review, your application will be rejected from competition if it is not in compliance with the requirements of the General Section of the SuperNOFA or the following additional standards are not met: (1) You must be an eligible HSI; (2) Your application requests a Federal grant that is no more than $400,000 over a two-year period; (3) There is only one application from your institution or a part of your institution; (4) At least one of the activities in your application is eligible. (B) Factors for Award Used to Evaluate and Rate Applications. The factors for rating and ranking applicants, and maximum points for each factor, are provided below. The maximum number of points for this program is 102. This includes two EZ/EC bonus points, as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (15 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have the organization resources necessary to successfully implement the proposed activities in a timely manner. In rating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which your application demonstrates the knowledge and experience of the overall project director and staff, including the day-to-day program manager, consultants and contractors in planning and managing the kinds of programs for which funding is being requested. If this experience is found within the HSI, you will receive higher points on this factor than if you have secured this experience from consultants, contractors, and other staff outside your institution. In addition, if you demonstrate that the previous experience is for the project team from the institution proposed for this project, you will receive higher points than if the experiences are for people not proposed to work on this project. Experience will be judged in terms of recent, relevant, and successful experience of your staff to undertake activities in: (a) Outreach activities in specific communities to solve or ameliorate significant housing and community development issues; (b) Undertaking specific successful community development projects with community-based organizations; and (c) Providing proven leadership in solving community problems which have a direct bearing on the proposed activity. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (15 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for funding the proposed program activities and an indication of the importance of meeting the need in the target area. In responding to this factor, you will be evaluated on the extent to which you document the level of need for the proposed activities and the importance of meeting the need. You should use statistics and analyses contained in a data source(s) that: (1) Is sound and reliable. To the extent that your targeted community's Five (5) Year Consolidated Plan and Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI) identify the level of the problem and the urgency in meeting the need, you should include references to these documents in your response to this factor. The Department will view your application more favorably if you have used these documents to identify need. If your proposed activities are not covered under the scope of the Consolidated Plan and AI, you should indicate such, and use other sound data sources to identify the level of need and the urgency in meeting the need. Types of other sources include Census reports, HUD Continuum of Care gaps analysis, law enforcement agency crime reports, Public Housing Authorities' Comprehensive Plans, community needs analyses such as provided by the United Way, the HSI, etc., and other sound and reliable sources appropriate for the HSIAC program. You may also address needs in terms of fulfilling court orders or consent decrees, settlements, conciliation agreements, and voluntary compliance agreements. (2) To the extent possible, the data you use should be specific to the area where the proposed activities will be carried out. You should document needs as they apply to the area where the activities will be targeted, rather than the entire locality or State, unless the target area is the entire locality or State. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (50 Points) This rating factor addresses the quality and cost-effectiveness of your proposed work plan. There must be a clear relationship between the proposed activities, the community's needs, and the purpose of HSIAC for you to receive points on this factor. (1) Quality of the Statement of Work. (20 points) Your statement of work must incorporate all proposed activities, describing in detail how the activities will alleviate and/or fulfill the needs identified in Factor 2 and how the activities will be implemented. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider: (a) (10 points) The extent to which your proposed statement of work identifies the specific services or activities to be performed. In reviewing this subfactor, HUD will consider the extent to which: (i) Your proposal outlines a clear agenda based on your familiarity with existing work/activities in the target area. You should demonstrate that your proposed activities do not duplicate work/ activities previously completed or currently underway by others and that they meet a CDBG national objective and are eligible activities under the CDBG program; (ii) You demonstrate how your activities will fit into and strengthen your role in addressing community development needs in your locality; and how the proposed project will potentially yield innovative strategies or ``best practices'' that can be duplicated and disseminated to other organizations. (b) (10 points) The extent to which the proposed activities involve the communities to be served in implementation of these activities. HUD will look at the extent to which: (i) Representatives of the local communities (that reflect a balance of race, ethnic, disability, gender, and income of the residents of the community to be served) are involved or [[Page 9674]] will be involved to address the needs identified in Rating Factor 2; (ii) Evidence is provided that you invited neighborhood organizations and local government entities to participate, or that they did participate in the identification of the activities to be undertaken; and (iii) The methods you used for outreach to the community during the development of the application and propose to use for implementation of the proposed project will be effective. (2) Feasibility of Successful and Timely Delivery of Products and Implementation. (10 points) Your statement of work must describe the timing of all activities to be undertaken and completed under the grant. You should describe the products you will deliver in 6 month intervals, up to 24 months and indicate which staff under Factor 1 will be responsible and accountable for the deliverables. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which the proposed activities will achieve the purposes of the program within the grant period and the extent to which the schedule represents an efficient and feasible plan for implementation of your proposed activities. You should identify specific time-phases and measurable objectives to be accomplished during the period of performance; the proposed short- and long-term program objectives to be achieved as a result of the proposed activities; the tangible and measurable impacts the statement of work will have on the community in general and on the target area in particular; and the relationship of the proposed activities to other on-going or proposed efforts to improve the economic, social, or living environment in the target area. (3) Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing. (5 points) The extent to which you propose to undertake activities designed to affirmatively further fair housing, for example: (a) Working with other entities in the community to overcome impediments to fair housing, such as discrimination in the sale or rental of housing or in advertising, provision of brokerage services or lending; (b) Promoting fair housing choice through the expansion of homeownership opportunities and improved quality of services for minorities, families with children, and persons with disabilities; or (c) Providing housing mobility counseling services. (4) HUD priorities. (5 points) The extent to which your application will further and support the following priorities of HUD: (1) Promoting healthy homes; (2) Providing opportunities for self-sufficiency, particularly for persons enrolled in welfare-to-work programs; (3) Enhancing on-going efforts to eliminate drugs and crime from neighborhoods through program policy efforts such as ``One Strike and You Are Out'' or the ``Officer Next Door'' initiative; or (4) Providing educational, job training, and homeownership opportunities through such initiatives as GEAR UP, Neighborhood Networks, Campus of Learners, and linking programs to Americorps. The Healthy Homes initiative implements a series of initiatives to protect children from home hazards such as lead-based paint, radon, fires, and accidents around the home. The GEAR UP initiative promotes partnerships between colleges and middle or junior high schools in low-income communities, to help teach students how they can go to college by informing them about college options, academic requirements, costs, and financial aid, and by providing support services, including tutoring, counseling, and mentoring. The Neighborhood Networks initiative enhances the self-sufficiency, employability, and economic self-reliance of low-income families and the elderly living in HUD-insured and HUD-assisted properties by providing them with on-site access to computer and training resources. The Campus of Learners initiative is designed to transform public housing into safe and livable communities where families undertake training in new telecommunications and computer technology and partake in educational opportunities and job training initiatives. (4) Institutionalization of Project Activities. (10 points) The extent to which your project will result in the kinds of proposed activities being sustained by becoming part of the mission of your institution. In reviewing this subfactor, HUD will consider the extent to which program activities relate to your institution's mission; are part of a climate that rewards faculty work on these kinds of activities through promotion and tenure; benefits students because they are part of a service learning program at your institution; and are reflected in the curriculum. HUD will look at your commitment to faculty and staff continuing work in the target area or other similar areas and to your longer term commitment (five years after the start of the grant) of hard dollars to similar work. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 Points) This factor addresses your ability to secure community resources, which can be combined with HUD program funds to achieve program objectives. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you have established partnerships with other entities to secure additional resources to increase the effectiveness of the proposed activities. Resources may include funding or in-kind contributions, such as services or equipment. Resources may be provided by governmental entities, public or private nonprofit organizations, for- profit private organizations, or other entities. You may also establish partnerships with other program funding recipients to coordinate the use of resources in the target area. You may count overhead and other institutional costs (e.g., salaries) that are waived as leveraging. However, higher points will be awarded if you secure leveraging resources from sources outside the institution. You must provide letters or other documentation showing the extent and firmness of commitments of leveraged funds (including your own resources) in order for these resources to count in determining points under this factor. These commitment letters or documents must be dated no earlier than the date of this published SuperNOFA. This documentation should include the organization's name, proposed level of commitment and responsibilities as they relate to the proposed program. The commitment must also be signed by the official of the organization legally able to make commitments on behalf of the organization. Any resource for which there is no commitment letter will not be counted, nor will the resource be counted without the proposed level of commitment being quantified. If your application does not include evidence of leveraging, it will receive zero (0) points for this Factor. Rating Factor 5: Comprehensiveness and Coordination (10 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have coordinated your activities with other known organizations, participate or promote participation in a community's Consolidated Planning process, and are working towards addressing a need in a holistic and comprehensive manner through linkages with other activities in the community. For specific information about your locality's process, contact the local or State Community [[Page 9675]] Development Agency or the local HUD field office. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you demonstrate that you have: (1) (4 points) Coordinated your proposed activities with those of other groups or organizations prior to submission in order to best complement, support, and coordinate all known activities and, if funded, the specific steps you will take to share information on solutions with others. Any written agreements, memoranda of understanding in place, or that will be in place after award, should be described. (2) (3 points) Taken or will take specific steps to become active in the community's Consolidated Planing process (including the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice) established to identify and address a need/problem that is related to the activities you propose. (3) (3 points) Taken or will take specific steps to develop linkages to coordinate comprehensive solutions through meetings, information networks, planning processes or other mechanisms with: (a) Other HUD-funded projects/activities outside the scope of those covered by the Consolidated Plan; and (b) Other Federal, State or locally-funded activities, including those proposed or on-going in the community. (C) Selections. In order to be funded, you must receive a minimum score of 70 points. HUD will fund applications in rank order, until it has awarded all available funds. If two or more applications have the same number of points, the application with the most points for Factor 3, Soundness of Approach, shall be selected. If there is still a tie, the application with the most points for Factor 4, Leveraging, shall be selected. HUD will not fund specific proposed activities that do not meet eligibility requirements (see 24 CFR part 570, subpart C) or do not meet a national objective in accordance with 24 CFR 570.208. HUD reserves the right to make selections out of rank order to provide for geographic distribution of funded HSIACs. If HUD decides to use this option, it will do so only if two adjacent HUD regions do not yield at least one fundable HSIAC on the basis of rank order. If this occurs, HUD will fund the highest ranking applicant within the two regions as long as the minimum score of 70 points is achieved. After all application selections have been made, HUD may require that you participate in negotiations to determine the specific terms of the Statement of Work and the grant budget. In cases where HUD cannot successfully complete negotiations, or you fail to provide HUD with requested information, an award will not be made. In such instances, HUD may elect to offer an award to the next highest ranking applicant, and proceed with negotiations with that applicant. After award but before grant execution, winners will be required to provide a certification from an Independent Public Accountant or the cognizant government auditor, stating that the financial management system employed by your institution meets proscribed standards for funds control and accountability required by OMB Circular A-133, Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations, or 24 CFR part 84, or the Federal Acquisitions Regulations (for all other applicants). This information should contain the name and telephone number of the Independent Auditor, cognizant Federal auditor, or other audit agency, as applicable. V. Application Submission Requirements You should include an original and two copies of the items listed below. In order to be able to recycle paper, please do not submit applications in bound form; binder clips or loose leaf binders are acceptable. Also, please do not use colored paper. Please note the page limits for some of the items listed below and do not exceed them. In addition to the forms, certifications and assurances listed in Section II(G) of the General Section, your application must, at a minimum, contain the following items: (A) Transmittal Letter, signed by the Chief Executive Officer of your institution or his or her designee. If a designee signs, your application must include the official designation of signatory authority. (B) Application Checklist. (C) Abstract/Executive Summary (one page limit) describing the goals and activities of the project. (D) Statement of Work (25 page limit) incorporating all activities to be funded in your application and details how your proposed work will be accomplished. Following a task-by-task format, the Statement of Work must: (1) Arrange the presentation of major related activities (e.g., rehabilitation of a child care center, provision of tutoring services), summarize each activity, identify the primary persons involved in carrying out the activity, and delineate the major tasks involved in carrying it out. (2) Indicate the sequence in which tasks are to be performed, noting areas of work that must be performed simultaneously. (3) Identify the specific numbers of quantifiable intermediate and end products and objectives the applicant aims to deliver by the end of the grant period as a result of the work performed. (E) Narrative Statement Addressing the Factors for Award. (25 page limit, including tables, and maps, but not including any letters of commitment) You should number the narrative in accordance with each factor and subfactor. Please do not repeat material in the Statement of Work. (F) Budget. The budget presentation should be consistent with the Statement of Work and include: (1) A budget by task, using the sample form included in the application kit. This form separates the Federal and non-Federal costs of each program activity. Particular attention should be paid to accurately estimating costs; determining the necessity for and reasonableness of costs; and correctly computing all budget items and totals. (2) A narrative statement of how you arrived at your costs, for any line item over $5,000. When necessary, quotes from various vendors or historical data should be used and included. All direct labor or salaries must be supported with mandated city/state pay scales or other documentation. Indirect costs must be substantiated and the rate must have been approved by the cognizant Federal agency. If you are proposing to undertake rehabilitation of residential, commercial, or industrial structures or acquisition, construction, or installation of public facilities and improvements, you must submit reasonable costs supplied by a qualified entity other than your institution. Such an entity must be in the business of housing rehabilitation, construction or management. Guidance for securing these estimates can be obtained from the CPD Director in your HUD field office or from your local government. You may not submit appendices or general support letters or resumes. If you submit letters of leveraging commitment, they must be included in your response to Factor 4. If you submit other documentation, it must be included with the pertinent factor responses (taking note of the page limit). VI. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. [[Page 9676]] VII. Environmental Requirements If you propose activities (such as physical development activities) that are not excluded from environmental review under 24 CFR 50.19(b), HUD will conduct an environmental review in accordance with 24 CFR part 50, before HUD approves the proposal (i.e., releases HSIAC funds). If the requirements of part 50 are not met, HUD reserves the right to terminate all or portions of your award. You are not authorized to proceed with any activity requiring such approval until written approval is received from the appropriate HUD Field Office Environmental Clearance Officer in its area certifying that the project has been approved and released from all environmental conditions. VIII. Authority This program is authorized under the section 107 of the CDBG appropriation for fiscal year 1999, as part of the ``Veterans Administration, HUD and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act of 1999'' (Pub. L. 105-276, approved October 21, 1998). For this first year of the program, HSIAC is being implemented through this program section of the SuperNOFA and the policies governing its operation are contained herein.