Funding Availability for the Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program

Program Overview

    Purpose of the Program. The purpose of the Lead-Based Paint Hazard
Control Grant Program is to assist States, Indian Tribes and local
governments in undertaking comprehensive programs to identify and
control lead-based paint hazards in eligible privately-owned housing
for rental or owner-occupants in partnership with community-based organizations.

Available Funds. Approximately $56 million. Eligible Applicants. States, Indian Tribes or local governments. If you are a State or Tribal applicant, you must have a Lead-Based Paint Contractor Certification and Accreditation Program authorized by EPA. Application Deadline. May 26, 1999. Match. A minimum of 10% match in local funds. Additional Information I. Application Due Date, Application Kits, Further Information, and Technical Assistance Application Due Date. Submit your original and four copies of your completed application to HUD on or before May 26, 1999. See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for additional information regarding submitting your application. Address for Submitting Applications. Submit your completed application (original and four copies): Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Lead Hazard Control, Room P3206, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Washington, D.C. 20410. Applications which are hand carried or sent via overnight delivery should be delivered to Suite 3206, 490 East L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, D.C. 20024. For Application Kits. You may obtain an application kit from the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD-8929, or the TTY number at 1- 800-483-2209. When requesting an application kit, please refer to the Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program. Please be sure to provide your name, address (including zip code), and telephone number (including area code). For Further Information. Contact Ellis G. Goldman, Director, Program Management Division, Office of Lead Hazard Control, at the address above; telephone (202) 755-1785, extension 112 (this is not a toll-free number). If you are a hearing-or speech-impaired person, you may reach the above telephone numbers via TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339. For Technical Assistance. Please refer to the General Section of this SuperNOFA for information regarding the provision of technical assistance. The HUD Lead Hazard Control staff that will provide technical assistance for the Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Program. Please see the ``For Further Information'' section above for the address and phone number. II. Amount Allocated (A) Approximately fifty six million dollars ($56 million) will be available for the Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program. (B) Approximately 20-25 grants of $1 million-$4 million will be awarded. If you are an existing grantee or previously unfunded applicant, you are eligible to apply for grants of $1 million-$4 million. A maximum of 60% of the funds under this program section of the SuperNOFA shall be available to current Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control grantees. Applications from existing (or previous) grantees will be evaluated and scored as a separate group and will not be in direct competition with applications from previously unfunded applicants. (C) In the selection process, once available funds have been allocated to meet the requested or negotiated amounts of the top eligible applicants, HUD reserves the right to offer any residual amount as partial funding to the next eligible applicant, provided HUD is satisfied that the residual amount is sufficient to support a viable, though reduced effort, by such applicant(s). If you are an applicant offered a reduced grant amount you will have a maximum of seven (7) calendar days to accept such the reduced award. If you fail to respond within the seven day limit, you shall be considered to have declined the award. III. Program Description, Eligible Applicants, and Eligible Activities (A) Program Description. The Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program assists States, Indian Tribes and local governments in undertaking programs for the identification and control of lead-based paint hazards in eligible privately-owned housing units for rental and owner-occupants. The application kit for this program section of the SuperNOFA lists HUD- associated housing programs which also meet the definition of eligible housing. (1) Because lead-based paint is a national problem, these funds will be awarded to: (a) Maximize both the number of children protected from lead poisoning and housing units where lead-hazards are controlled; (b) Target lead hazard control efforts at housing in which children are at greatest risk of lead poisoning; (c) Stimulate cost-effective approaches that can be replicated; (d) Emphasize lower cost methods of hazard control; (e) Build local capacity to safely and effectively address lead hazards during lead hazard control, renovation, remodeling, and maintenance activities; and (f) Affirmatively further fair housing and environmental justice. (2) The objectives of this program include: (a) Implementation of a national strategy, as defined in Title X, to build the community's capacity necessary to eliminate lead-based paint hazards in all housing, as widely and quickly as possible by establishing a workable framework for lead-based paint hazard identification and control; (b) Mobilization of public and private resources, involving cooperation among all levels of government, the private sector, and community-based organizations to develop, cost-effective methods for identifying and controlling lead-based paint hazards; (c) Development of comprehensive community approaches which result in integration of all community resources (governmental, community- based, and private businesses) to address lead hazards in housing; (d) Integration of lead-safe work practices into housing maintenance, repair, weatherization, rehabilitation, and other programs which will continue beyond your grant period; (e) Establishment of a public registry (listing) of lead-safe housing; and (f) To the greatest extent feasible, promotion of job training, employment, and other economic opportunities for low-income and minority residents and businesses that are owned by and/or employ low- income and minority residents as defined in 24 CFR 135.5 (See 59 FR 33881, June 30, 1994). (B) Eligible Applicants. (1) To be eligible to apply for funding under this program, you must be a State, Indian Tribe, or unit of local government. Multiple units of a local government (or multiple local governments) may apply as part of a consortium; however, you must identify a single lead government or agency as ``the applicant.'' You may submit only one application. In the event you submit multiple applications, this will be [[Page 9702]] considered a curable (minor) defect and the application review process delayed until you notify HUD in writing which application should be reviewed. Your other applications will be returned unevaluated. (2) As an applicant, you must meet all of the threshold requirements of Section II (B) of the General Section of the SuperNOFA. (3) Consolidated Plans. (a) If your jurisdiction has a current HUD approved Consolidated Plan, you must submit documentation of the HUD approval of the current program year Consolidated Plan. You must submit, as an appendix, a copy of the lead-based paint element included in the approved Consolidated Plan. (b) If your jurisdiction does not have a currently approved Consolidated Plan, but it is otherwise eligible for this grant program, you must include your jurisdiction's abbreviated Consolidated Plan, which includes a lead-based paint hazard control strategy developed in accordance with 24 CFR 91.235. (4) If you are a local government, your application must provide written documentation of partnerships or contractual relationships with community-based organizations to carry out the proposed work plan. Such relationships may include program planning; public awareness, education, and outreach; inspection and hazard control; relocation; and other related services. If you are a State government, you must provide written documentation of partnerships or contractual relationships with community-based organizations prior to grant award. This requirement does not apply to Indian Tribes. (5) If you are a State government or an Indian Tribal government, you must have an authorized EPA Lead-Based Paint Contractor Certification and Accreditation Program to be eligible. (6) If you were funded under the FY 1998 Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control NOFA issued March 31, 1998 (63 FR 15555), you are not eligible for funding under this program section of the SuperNOFA. (7) The eligibility factors discussed in (1) through (6) above are threshold requirements. If you do not satisfy the appropriate eligibility requirements stated in these paragraphs, your HUD will not review your application. (C) Eligible Activities HUD will provide considerable latitude to grantees in designing and implementing the methods of lead-based paint hazard control to be used in their jurisdictions. Experience and data from past and ongoing evaluations have identified effective approaches. HUD is interested in promoting lead hazard control approaches that result in the reduction of this health threat for the maximum number of low-income residents, and that demonstrate techniques which are cost-effective, efficient, and can be used elsewhere. HUD will allow flexibility within the parameters established below. (1) Generally, funds will be available only for projects conducted by contractors, risk assessors, inspectors, workers and others engaged in lead-based paint activities who meet the requirements of an EPA authorized State or Tribal Lead-Based Paint Contractor Certification and Accreditation Program under the requirements of section 404 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). However, low level hazard interventions (e.g., dust control and minor paint stabilization) do not require certified personnel. (2) Direct Project Elements that you may undertake directly or through subrecipients, include: (a) Performing dust testing, hazard screens, inspections, and risk assessments of eligible housing constructed before 1978 to determine the presence of lead hazards from paint, dust, or soil. (b) Conducting pre-hazard control blood lead testing of children under the age of six residing in units undergoing inspection, risk assessment, or hazard control. (c) Conducting lead hazard control, which may include any combination of the following: interim control of lead-based paint hazards in housing (which may include intensive cleaning techniques to address lead dust); abatement of lead-based paint hazards using different methods for each unit (based on the condition of the unit and the extent of hazards); and abatement of lead-based paint hazards, including soil and dust, by means of removal, enclosure, encapsulation, or replacement methods. Complete abatement of all lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil is not acceptable as a cost effective strategy unless justification is provided and approved by HUD. Abatement of lead-contaminated soil should be limited to areas with bare soil in the immediate vicinity of the structure, i.e., dripline or foundation of the structure being treated, and children's play areas. (d) Carrying out temporary relocation of families and individuals during the period in which hazard control is conducted and until the time the affected unit receives clearance for reoccupancy. (e) Performing blood lead testing and air sampling to protect the health of the hazard control workers, supervisors, and contractors. (f) Undertaking minimal housing rehabilitation activities that are specifically required to carry out effective hazard control, and without which the hazard control could not be completed and maintained. Hazard Control grant funds may be used for lead hazard control work done in conjunction with other housing rehabilitation programs. HUD strongly encourages integration of this grant program with housing rehabilitation. (g) Conducting clearance dust-wipe testing and laboratory analysis. (h) Engineering and architectural activities that are required for, and in direct support of, lead hazard control. (i) Providing lead-based paint worker or contractor certification training and/or licensing to low-income persons. (j) Providing free training on lead-safe, essential maintenance practices to homeowners, renters, painters, remodelers, and apartment maintenance staff working in low-income private housing. (k) Providing cleaning supplies for lead-hazard control to community/neighborhood-based organizations, homeowners, and renters in low-income private housing. (l) Conducting general or targeted community awareness, education or outreach programs on lead hazard control and lead poisoning prevention. This includes educating owners of rental properties on the Fair Housing Act and training on lead-safe maintenance and renovation practices. Upon request, this also would include making all materials available in alternative formats to persons with disabilities (e.g.; Braille, audio, large type). (m) Securing liability insurance for lead-hazard control activities. (n) Supporting data collection, analysis, and evaluation of grant program activities. This includes compiling and delivering such information and data as may be required by HUD. This activity is separate from administrative costs. (o) Conducting applied research activities directed at demonstration of cost effective methods for lead hazard control. (p) Purchasing or leasing equipment having a per unit cost under $5,000, except for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzers. (q) Purchasing or leasing up to two (2) X-ray fluorescence analyzers for use by the Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program. [[Page 9703]] (r) Preparing a final report at the conclusion of grant activities. (3) Support Elements. (a) Administrative costs. There is a 10% maximum for administrative costs. The application kit contains specific information on administrative costs in Annex 7. (b) Program planning and management costs of sub-grantees and other sub-recipients. (D) Ineligible Activities You may not use grant funds for any of the following: (1) Purchase of real property. (2) Purchase or lease of equipment having a per unit cost in excess of $5,000, except for X-ray fluorescence analyzers. (3) Chelation or other medical treatment costs related to children with elevated blood lead levels. Non-Federal funds used to cover these costs may be counted as part of the required matching contribution. (4) Lead hazard control activities in publicly owned housing, or project-based Section 8 housing. A table listing eligibility of various HUD programs is included in Annex 5 of the application kit. IV. Program Requirements In addition to the program requirements listed in the General Section of this SuperNOFA, you, the applicant, must comply with the following requirements: (A) Budgeting. (1) Matching Contribution. You must provide a matching contribution of at least 10% of the requested grant sum. This may be in the form of a cash or in-kind (non-cash) contribution or a combination of both. With the sole exception of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, Federal funds may not be used to satisfy the statutorily required ten (10) percent matching requirement. Federal funds may be used, however, for contributions above the statutory requirement. If you do not show a minimum 10% match in your application, you will be rated lower during the evaluation process, and, if selected, you will be required to provide the matching contribution before being given the grant. (2) Applied Research Activities. You may identify a maximum of five (5%) percent of the total grant request for applied research activities. (3) Administrative Costs. There is a 10% maximum for administrative costs. (B) Period of Performance. The period of performance is 36 months. (C) Certified Performers. You may use grant funds only for projects conducted by certified contractors, risk assessors, inspectors, workers and others engaged in lead-based paint activities. (D) Coastal Barrier Resources Act. Pursuant to the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (16 U.S.C. 3501), you may not use grant funds for properties located in the Coastal Barrier Resources System. (E) Flood Disaster Protection Act. Under the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4001-4128), you may not use grant funds for lead-based paint hazard control of a building or mobile home that is located in an area identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as having special flood hazards unless: (1) The community in which the area is situated is participating in the National Flood Insurance Program in accordance with the applicable regulations (44 CFR parts 59-79), or less than a year has passed since FEMA notification regarding these hazards; and (2) Where the community is participating in the National Flood Insurance Program, flood insurance on the property is obtained in accordance with section 102(a) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act (42 U.S.C. 4012a(a)). You are responsible for assuring that flood insurance is obtained and maintained for the appropriate amount and term. (F) National Historic Preservation Act. The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) and the regulations at 36 CFR part 800 apply to the lead-based paint hazard control activities that are undertaken pursuant to this program. HUD and the Advisory Council for Historic Preservation have developed an optional Model Agreement for use by grantees and State Historic Preservation Officers in carrying out activities under this program. (G) Waste Disposal. You must handle waste disposal according to the requirements of the appropriate local, State and Federal regulatory agencies. You must handle disposal of wastes from hazard control activities that contain lead-based paint but are not classified as hazardous in accordance with the HUD Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Hazards in Housing (HUD Guidelines). (H) Worker Protection Procedures. You must observe the procedures for worker protection established in the HUD Guidelines, as well as the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) (29 CFR 1926.62--Lead Exposure in Construction), or the State or local occupational safety and health regulations, whichever are most protective. If other applicable requirements contain more stringent requirements than the HUD Guidelines, the more rigorous standards shall be followed. (I) Prohibited Practices. You must not engage in practices that are not allowed because of health and safety risks. Methods that generate high levels of lead dust shall be undertaken only with requisite worker protection, containment of dust and debris, suitable clean-up, and clearance. Prohibited practices include: (1) Open flame burning or torching; (2) Machine sanding or grinding without a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) exhaust control; (3) Uncontained hydroblasting or high pressure wash; (4) Abrasive blasting or sandblasting without HEPA exhaust control; (5) Heat guns operating above 1100 degrees Fahrenheit; (6) Chemical paint strippers containing methylene chloride; and (7) Dry scraping or dry sanding, except scraping in conjunction with heat guns or around electrical outlets or when treating no more than two (2) square feet in any one interior room or space, or totaling no more than 20 square feet on exterior surfaces. (J) Proposed Modifications From Current Procedures. Proposed methods that differ from currently approved standards or procedures will be considered on their merits through a separate HUD review and approval process after the grant award is made and a specific justification has been presented. When you make such a request, either in the application or during the planning phase, HUD may consult with experts from both the public and private sector as part of its final determinations and will document its findings in an environmental assessment. HUD will not approve proposed modifications that, in HUD's opinion, involve a lowering of standards with potential to adversely affect the health of residents, contractors or workers, or the quality of the environment. (K) Written Policies and Procedures. You must have clearly established, written policies and procedures for all phases of lead hazard control, including risk assessment, inspection, development of specifications, pre-hazard control blood lead testing, financing, relocation and clearance testing. Grantees, subcontractors, sub- grantees, sub-recipients, and their contractors must adhere to these policies and procedures. (L) Continued Availability of Lead Safe Housing to Low-Income Families. [[Page 9704]] Units in which lead hazards have been controlled under this program shall be occupied by and/or continue to be available to low-income residents as required by Title X. You must maintain a registry (listing) of units in which lead hazards have been controlled for distribution and marketing to agencies and families as suitable housing for children under six. (M) Testing. In developing your application budget, include costs for inspection, risk assessment, and clearance testing for each dwelling that will receive lead hazard control, as follows: (1) Testing. (a) General. All testing and sampling shall conform to the current HUD Guidelines. It is particularly important to provide this full cycle of testing for lead hazard control, including interim controls. (b) Pre-Hazard Control. A combined inspection and risk assessment is recommended. You should ensure that the results of the pre-hazard control investigation are sufficient to support hazard control decisions. When appropriate, you may elect to perform a lead hazard screen in lieu of an inspection or risk assessment. (c) In the event you propose to conduct lead hazard control work without identification of lead hazards from paint, dust, and soil, you must fully justify the technical and other rationale for such a proposal. HUD must approve such proposals. Approval is subject to HUD environmental review under 24 CFR part 50. (d) Clearance Testing. Clearance dust testing must be conducted according to the HUD Guidelines. You are required to meet the current post-hazard control dust-wipe test clearance thresholds contained in the HUD Guidelines (these are also provided in the application kit). Wipe tests shall be conducted by a certified inspector who is independent of the lead hazard control contractor. Dust-wipe and soil samples, and any paint samples to be analyzed by a laboratory, must be analyzed by a laboratory recognized by the EPA National Lead Laboratory Accreditation Program (NLLAP). Units treated shall not be reoccupied until clearance is achieved. (2) Blood lead testing. Before lead hazard control work begins, each occupant who is under six years old must be tested for lead poisoning within six months prior to the housing intervention. Any child with an elevated blood lead level must be referred for appropriate medical follow-up. (N) Cooperation With Related Research and Evaluation. You shall cooperate fully with any research or evaluation sponsored by HUD and associated with this grant program, including preservation of project data and records and compiling requested information in formats provided by the researchers, evaluators or HUD. This also may include the compiling of certain relevant local demographic, dwelling unit, and participant data not contemplated in your original proposal. Participant data shall be subject to Privacy Act protection. (O) Data collection. You will be required to collect and maintain the data necessary to document the various lead hazard control methods used in order to determine the effectiveness and relative cost of these methods. (P) Section 3 Employment Opportunities. Please see the General Section of this SuperNOFA. The Section 3 requirements are applicable to the Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Program. (Q) Certifications and Assurances. In addition to the certifications and assurances listed in the General Section of the SuperNOFA, a single certification form is included in the application kit for your signature. This includes: (1) Assurance of your compliance with the environmental laws and authorities described in 24 CFR part 58. (2) Certification of your compliance with the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970, and the implementing regulations at 49 CFR part 24; and HUD Handbook 1378 (Tenant Assistance, Relocation and Real Property Acquisition). (3) Assurance that your financial management system meets the standards for fund control and accountability described in 24 CFR 85.20. (4) Assurance that you will conduct testing associated with pre- hazard control and clearance conducted by certified performers. (5) Assurance that, to the extent possible, you will conduct the blood lead testing, blood lead level test results, and medical referral and follow up for children under six years of age occupying affected units according to the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publication Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children (1991). (6) Assurance that you will not use Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program funds to replace existing resources dedicated to any ongoing project. (7) Assurance that the housing units in which lead hazards have been controlled under this program will be occupied by and/or continue to be available to low-income residents as required by Title X. You are required to maintain a registry of units in which lead hazards have been controlled for distribution and marketing to agencies and families as suitable housing for children under six. (8) Certification that you will carry out your lead hazard control program under an EPA authorized State lead-based paint contractor certification and accreditation program that is at least as protective as the training and certification program requirements cited in the application kit for this program section of the SuperNOFA. (R) Davis-Bacon Act. The Davis-Bacon Act does not apply to this program. However, if you use grant funds in conjunction with other Federal programs in which Davis-Bacon prevailing wage rates apply, then Davis-Bacon provisions would apply to the extent required under the other Federal programs. V. Application Selection Process (A) Rating and Ranking HUD intends to fund the highest ranked applications within the limits of funding, but reserves the right to advance other eligible applicants in funding rank. A decision to advance an applicant will be based on programs that: foster local approaches or lead hazard control methods that have not been employed before, or provide lead hazard control services to populations or communities that have high need (as measured by the ``Need'' factor for award) and have never received funding under this grant program. (B) Factors for Award Used To Evaluate and Rate Applications The factors for rating and ranking applicants, and maximum points for each factor, are stated below. The maximum number of points to be awarded is 102. This maximum includes two EZ/EC bonus points as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Also, Section III(C)(2) of the General Section, which addresses a court-ordered consideration, is applicable to this program. The application kit will provide additional guidance for responding to these factors. The application kit also contains definitions and references that will be incorporated into your grant award. [[Page 9705]] Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (15 points for previously unfunded applicants; 25 points for existing grantees) This factor addresses your organizational capacity necessary to successfully implement the proposed activities in a timely manner. The rating of the ``applicant'' or the ``applicant's staff'' for technical merit or threshold compliance, unless otherwise specified, includes any community-based organizations, sub-contractors, consultants, sub- recipients, and members of consortia which are firmly committed to your project. In rating this factor, HUD will consider: (1) Your recent, relevant and successful demonstrated experience (including governmental and community-based partners) to undertake eligible program activities. You must describe the knowledge and experience of the proposed overall project director and day-to-day program manager in planning and managing large and complex interdisciplinary programs, especially involving housing rehabilitation, public health, or environmental programs. You must demonstrate that you have sufficient personnel or will be able to quickly retain qualified experts or professionals, to immediately begin your proposed work program and to perform your proposed activities in a timely and effective fashion. In the narrative response for this factor, you should include information on your program staff, their experience, commitment to the program, salary information, and position titles. Resumes (for up to three key personnel), position descriptions, and a clearly identified organizational chart for the lead hazard control grant program effort must be included in an appendix. Indicate the percentage of time that key personnel will devote to your project. We recommend using a full-time day-to-day program manager. Describe how other principal components of your agency or other organizations will participate in or otherwise support the grant program. You may demonstrate capacity by prior experience in initiating and implementing lead hazard control efforts and/or related environmental, health, or housing projects and should be thoroughly described. You should indicate how this prior experience will be used in carrying out your proposed comprehensive Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program. (2) If you have received previous HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant funding, your past experience will be evaluated in terms of progress under the most recent previous grant. You must provide a description of your progress in implementing your most recent grant award within the period of performance, including the total number of housing units completed as of the most recent calendar quarter. Rating Factor 2: Needs/Extent of the Problem (20 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for the proposed program activities to address a documented problem in the target area. (1) Document a critical level of need for your proposed activities in the area where activities will be carried out. Since the principal objective of the program is to prevent at-risk children from being poisoned, specific attention must be paid to documenting such need as it applies to the targeted areas, rather than the entire locality or state. If the target area is an entire locality or state, then documenting need at this level is appropriate. (2) Document the extent of the problem which will be addressed by your proposed activities. Examples of data that you might use to demonstrate need, include, but are not limited to: (a) Numbers and proportions of children with elevated blood lead levels; (b) Economic and demographic data relevant to the target area, including poverty and unemployment rates; (c) Housing market data available from HUD, or other data sources, including the Consolidated Plan/AI, Public Housing Authority's Five Year Comprehensive Plan, State or local Welfare Department's Welfare Reform Plan; or (d) Lack of other Federal, State or local funding that could be, or is used, to address lead hazard control. (3) To the extent that statistics and other data contained in your community's Consolidated Plan or Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI) support the extent of the problem, you should include references to the Consolidated Plan and the AI in your response. (4) Provide information on your jurisdiction, or preferably, the areas targeted for the lead hazard control activities (data may be available in your currently approved Consolidated Plan, derived from 1990 Census Data, or special local studies): (a) The age and condition of housing; (b) The number and percentage of very-low (income less than 50% of the area median) and low (income less than 80% of the area median) income families, as determined by HUD, with adjustments for smaller and larger families; (c) The number and proportion of children under six years (72 months) of age at risk of lead poisoning; (d) The extent of the lead poisoning problem in children under six years of age in target areas; (e) The health and economic impacts of Superfund or Brownfields sites on the targeted neighborhoods or communities; and (f) Other socioeconomic or environmental factors that demonstrate a need to establish or continue lead hazard control work in your jurisdiction. (5) You also must provide documentation of the priority that the community's Consolidated Plan has placed on addressing the needs you described. (6) If your application addresses needs that are in the Consolidated Plan, Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice, court orders or consent decrees, settlements, conciliation agreements, and voluntary compliance agreements, you will receive more points than applicants that do not relate their program to identified needs. (7) For you to receive maximum points for this factor, there must be a direct relationship between your proposed activities, community needs, and the purpose of the program funding. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (45 points for previously unfunded applicants and 35 points for existing grantees) This factor addresses the quality and cost-effectiveness of your proposed work plan. You should present information on your proposed lead-based paint hazard control program and describe how it will satisfy the identified needs. To the extent possible, describe a comprehensive strategy to address the need to protect entire neighborhoods rather than individual units or homes. Your response to this factor should include the following elements: (1) Lead Hazard Control Strategy (35 points for previously unfunded applicants; 25 points for existing grantees). Describe your strategy to plan and execute your lead hazard control grant program. You should provide information on: (a) Implementing a Lead Hazard Control Program (15 points for previously unfunded applicants; 10 points for existing grantees). Describe your overall strategy for your proposed lead hazard control program. The description must include information on: [[Page 9706]] (i) Your previous experience in reducing or eliminating lead-based paint hazards in conjunction with other Federal, State or locally funded programs. (ii) Your overall strategy for the identification, selection, prioritization, and enrollment of units of eligible privately-owned housing for lead hazard control. Describe the proposed activities that will occur in a high performing Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community (EZ/EC). Provide estimates of the total number of owner occupied and/or rental units which will receive lead hazard control. (iii) The degree to which the work plan focuses on eligible privately-owned housing units with children under six years (72 months) old. Describe your planned approach to control lead hazards before children are poisoned and/or to control lead hazards in units where children have already been identified with an elevated blood lead level. Describe your process for referring and tracking children with elevated blood lead levels for medical case management. Provide estimates of the number of children you will assist through this program. (iv) The financing strategy, including eligibility requirements, terms, conditions, and amounts available, you will use in carrying out lead hazard control activities. You must discuss the way these funds will be administered (e.g. use of grants, deferred loans, forgivable loans, other resources, private sector financing, etc.), as well as the agency that will administer the financing process. (v) You should describe how your proposed program will satisfy the stated needs or will assist in addressing the impediments in the AI. Describe how your proposed program will further and support the policy priorities of the Department, including promoting healthy homes; providing opportunities for self-sufficiency, particularly for persons enrolled in welfare to work programs; or providing educational and job training opportunities. (b) Lead Hazard Control Outreach and Community Involvement (5 points for all applicants). Your application must describe: (i) Proposed methods of community education. These may include community awareness, education, training, and outreach programs in support of the work plan and objectives. This description should include general and/or targeted efforts undertaken to assist your program in reducing lead exposure. Programs should be culturally sensitive, targeted, and linguistically appropriate. Upon request, this approach would include making all materials available in alternative formats to persons with disabilities (e.g., Braille, audio, large type), to the extent possible. (ii) How you intend to involve neighborhood or community-based organizations in your proposed activities. Your activities may include outreach, community education, marketing, inspection (including dust lead testing), and the conduct of lead hazard control activities. HUD will evaluate the level of substantive involvement during the review process. (iii) Outreach strategies and methodologies to affirmatively further fair housing and provide lead-safe housing to all segments of the population: homeowners, owners of rental properties, and tenants; especially for occupants least likely to receive its benefits. Once the population to which outreach will be ``targeted'' is identified, outreach strategies directed specifically to them should be multifaceted. This criterion goes beyond testing and hazard control; it concerns what happens to the units after lead hazard control activities and tries to ensure, for the long term, that all families will have adequate, lead-safe housing choices. (iv) Describe the ways you will train individuals and contractors in housing related trades, such as painters, remodelers, renovators, and maintenance personnel, in lead-safe practices. Describe how you will integrate such practices into lead hazard control activities. (c) Technical Approach for Conducting Lead Hazard Control Activities (15 points for previously unfunded applicants; 10 points for existing grantees). (i) Describe your process for risk assessment and/or inspection of units of eligible privately-owned housing in which you will undertake lead hazard control. You may include in the inventory of housing to receive lead hazard control housing having a risk assessment or inspection already performed by certified inspectors or risk assessors, in accordance with the HUD Guidelines and identified with lead-based paint hazards. (ii) Describe your testing methods, schedule, and costs for performing blood lead testing, risk assessments and/or inspections to be used. If you propose to use a more restrictive standard than the HUD thresholds (e.g., 0.5% or 1.0 mg/cm 2), identify the lead- based paint threshold for undertaking lead hazard control which will be used. All testing shall be performed in accordance with the HUD Guidelines. (iii) Describe the lead hazard control methods you will undertake and the number of units you will treat for each method selected (interim controls, hazard abatement, and complete abatement). Provide an estimate of the per unit costs (and a basis for those estimates) for each lead hazard control method proposed and a schedule for initiating and completing lead hazard control work in the selected units. Discuss efforts to incorporate cost-effective lead hazard control methods. If you propose complete abatement, provide HUD with a detailed rationale for that decision. (iv) Describe how you will integrate proposed lead hazard control activities with rehabilitation activities. (v) Describe your contracting process, including development of specifications for selected lead hazard control methods. Describe the management processes you will use to ensure the cost-effectiveness of your lead hazard control methods. Your application must include a discussion of the contracting process for the conduct of lead hazard control activities in the selected units. (vi) Describe your plan for occupant protection or the temporary relocation of occupants of units selected for lead hazard control work. This discussion should address your use of safe houses and other housing arrangements, storage of household goods, stipends, incentives, etc. (vii) If you are an existing grantee, you must describe the actions you will take to ensure that your proposed lead hazard control work will occur concurrently with other ongoing HUD lead hazard control grant work. Your application must provide the detail necessary to assure HUD that you will implement the proposed work immediately and perform it concurrently with existing lead hazard control grant work. (viii) If you are an existing grantee, you must describe your progress in implementing your most recent lead hazard control grant award. If the production achieved is below the performance values (percentages of units completed) provided in the application kit, and no changes are proposed, you should explain why the strategy in the earlier grant remains appropriate. (2) Economic Opportunity (5 points for all applicants) Describe the methods to be used to provide economic opportunities for residents and businesses in the community. This discussion should include information on how you will promote training, employment, business development, and contract [[Page 9707]] opportunities as part of your lead hazard control program. Describe how you will accomplish the requirements of Section 3 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 to give preference to hiring of low- and very low-income persons or contracting with businesses owned by or employing low- and very low-income persons. (3) Program Evaluation, Data Collection, and Research (5 points for all applicants). Identify and discuss the specific methods and measures you will use (in addition to HUD reporting or data collection forms) to measure progress, evaluate program effectiveness, and make program changes to improve performance. Describe how you will obtain, document and report the information. Describe your plans to develop and maintain a registry of publicly available information on lead-safe units, so that families (particularly those with children under age six) can make informed decisions regarding their housing options. In addition, provide a detailed description of any proposed applied research activities. (4) Budget (not scored) HUD will evaluate your proposed budget (for 36 month period) to determine if it is reasonable, clearly justified, and consistent with the intended use of grant funds. HUD is not required to approve or fund all proposed activities. You may devote up to 36 months for the planning, implementation, and completion of lead hazard control activities. You must thoroughly document and justify all budget categories and costs (Part B of Standard Form 424A) and all major tasks. Describe in detail the budgeted costs for each program element (major task) included in the overall plan (the program elements are: administration; program management; marketing, community awareness, education and outreach; lead hazard control (including testing); relocation; program evaluation (including data collection); and applied research). Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 Points) This factor addresses your ability to obtain other community resources (financing is a community resource) that can be combined with HUD's program resources to achieve program objectives. (1) In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you have established working partnerships with other entities to get additional resources or commitments to increase the effectiveness of the proposed program activities. Resources may include cash or in- kind contributions (such as services or equipment) allocated to the proposed program. Resources may be provided by governmental entities, public or private organizations, or other entities partnering with you. Partnership relationships with community-based organizations are a requirement for State and local government applicants. State applicants which do not have such partnerships at the time of application will be required to establish partnership relationships between the state and/ or local subgrantees and community-based organizations immediately following grant award (this requirement does not apply to you if you are an Indian Tribe applicant). You also may partner with other program funding recipients to coordinate the use of resources in your target area. (2) You may not include funding from any Federally funded program (except the CDBG program) as part of your required 10% match. Other resources committed to the program that exceed the required 10% match will provide points for this rating factor and may include funds from other Federally funded programs. You must support each source of contributions, cash or in-kind, both for the required minimum and additional amounts, by a letter of commitment from the contributing entity, whether a public or private source. This letter must describe the contributed resources that you will use in the program. Staff in- kind contributions should be given a monetary value. If you do not provide letters specifying details and the amount of the actual contributions, those contributions will not being counted. (3) You must provide evidence of leveraging or partnerships by including letters of firm commitment, memoranda of understanding, or agreements to participate from those entities identified as partners in your application. Each letter of commitment, memorandum of understanding, or agreement to participate should include the organization's name, the proposed level of commitment and responsibilities as they relate to your proposed program. The commitment must be signed by an official of the organization legally able to make commitments on behalf of the organization. Describe the role of community-based organizations in specific program activities, such as hazard evaluation and control; monitoring; and awareness, education, and outreach within the community. Rating Factor 5: Comprehensiveness and Coordination (10 Points). This factor addresses the extent to which your program reflects a coordinated, community-based process of identifying needs and building a system to address the needs by using available HUD and other community resources. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider how you have: (1) Coordinated your proposed activities with those of other groups or organizations to best support and coordinate all known activities and, the specific steps you will take to share information on solutions and outcomes with others. Any written agreements or memoranda of understanding in place or proposed should be described. (2) Become actively involved (or if not currently active, the specific steps it will take to become active) in your community's Consolidated Planning process established to identify and address a need/problem that is related in whole, or part, directly, or indirectly to the activities you propose. (3) Developed linkages, or the specific steps you will take to develop linkages with other activities, programs or projects through meetings, information networks, planning processes or other mechanisms to coordinate your activities so solutions are comprehensive, including linkages with: (a) Other HUD funded projects/activities outside the scope of those covered by the Consolidated Plan; and (b) Other HUD, Federal, State or locally funded activities, including those proposed or on-going in the community(s) served. (4) Coordinated and integrated lead hazard control work with housing rehabilitation, housing and health codes, other related housing programs, or including work of community development corporations and childhood lead poisoning prevention programs. (a) Described the degree to which lead hazard control work will be done in conjunction with other housing-related activities (i.e., rehabilitation, weatherization, correction of code violations, and other similar work), and your plan for the integration and coordination of lead hazard control activities into those activities. (b) Described plans to incorporate lead-based paint maintenance, essential maintenance practices, and hazard control standards with the applicable housing codes and health regulations. (c) Described plans to generate and use public subsidies or other resources (such as revolving loan funds) to finance future lead hazard control activities. (d) Described plans to develop public-private lending partnerships to finance lead hazard control as part of acquisition and rehabilitation financing [[Page 9708]] including the use of Community Reinvestment Act ``credits'' by lending institutions. (e) Evidenced firm commitments from participating organizations by describing: (i) The name of each organization; (ii) The capabilities or focus of each organization; (iii) The proposed level of effort of each organization; and (iv) The resources and responsibilities of each organization, including the applicant's clearly proposed plans for the training and employment of low-income residents. (f) Described plans to implement a registry of lead-safe housing. (g) Detailed the extent to which the policy of affirmatively furthering fair housing for all segments of the population is advanced by the proposed activities. Detail how your proposed work plan will support the community's efforts to further housing choices for all segments of the population. If you have an existing grant, you should discuss activities which have contributed to enhanced lead safe housing opportunities to all segments of the population. (h) Described plans to adapt or amend statutes, regulations, or policies which will more fully integrate lead hazard control into community policies and priorities. (5) Coordinated and cooperated with other organizations which will lead to a reduction in lead risks to community residents. This could include such activities as free training on lead-safe repainting and remodeling; promotion of essential maintenance practices; and provision of lead dust testing to low-income, privately-owned homes which may not receive lead hazard control assistance under this grant program. VI. Application Submission Requirements (A) Applicant Information (1) Application Format The application narrative response to the Rating Factors is limited to a maximum of 25 pages. Your response must be typewritten on one (1) side only on 8\1/2\'' x 11'' paper using a 12 point (minimum) font with not less than \3/4\'' margins on all sides. Appendices should be referenced and discussed in the narrative response. Materials provided in the appendices should directly apply to the rating factor narrative. (2) Application Checklist In addition to the certifications and assurances listed in the General Section of the SuperNOFA, you must submit the following: (a) Transmittal Letter that identifies ``the applicant'' (or applicants) submitting the application, the dollar amount requested, what the program funds are requested for, and the nature of involvement with community-based organizations. (b) The name, mailing address, telephone number, and principal contact person of ``the applicant.'' If you have consortium associates, sub-grantees, partners, major subcontractors, joint venture participants, or others contributing resources to your project, you must provide similar information for each of these partners. (c) Lead-Based Paint Contractor Certification and Accreditation Program (i) If you are a State or Indian Tribe, the EPA authorization of the state program (Section 402 and 404 of TSCA) must be included. (ii) If you are a local government in States which do not have an EPA authorized lead-based paint contractor certification program, you must provide assurances that you will use only performers certified under EPA-authorized state programs in conducting lead hazard control work. (d) A detailed budget with supporting cost justifications for all budget categories of your grant request. You must provide a separate estimate for the overall grant management element (Administrative Costs), which is more fully defined in the application kit for this program section of the SuperNOFA. The budget shall include not more than 10% for administrative costs and not less than 90% for direct project elements. In the event of a discrepancy between grant amounts requested in various sections of the application, the amount you indicate on the SF-424 will govern as the correct value. (e) An itemized breakout (using the SF-424A) of your required matching contribution, including: (i) Values placed on donated in-kind services; (ii) Letters or other evidence of commitment from donors; and (iii) The amounts and sources of contributed resources. (f) Memoranda of Understanding or Agreement, letters of commitment or other documentation describing the proposed roles of agencies, local broad-based task forces, participating community or neighborhood-based groups or organizations, local businesses, and others working with the program. (g) A copy of your approval notification for the current program year for your jurisdiction's Consolidated Plan. You also should include a copy of the lead hazard control element included in your current program year's Consolidated Plan. (h) Narrative responses to the five rating factors. (B) Proposed Activities All applications must, at a minimum, contain the following items: (1) A description of the affected housing and population you will serve. (a) Describe the size and general characteristics of the target housing within the jurisdiction, including a description of the housing's location, condition, and occupants, and a current estimate of the number of children under the age of six in these units. You should provide other characteristics described in Rating Factor 2 (Need). If you are targeting specific area(s) (neighborhoods, census tracts, etc.) within your jurisdiction for lead hazard control activities, describe these same characteristics for the area. You should also include vacant housing that subsequently will be occupied by low-income renters or owners in this description. You may include maps as an appendix. (b) Provide information on the magnitude and extent of the childhood lead poisoning problem within your jurisdiction and for any area(s) you will include in your lead hazard control program. (c) Narrative statement addressing the rating factors for award of funding under this program section of the SuperNOFA. Your narrative statement must be numbered in accordance with each factor for award (Factor 1 through 5). VII. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. VIII. Environmental Requirements In accordance with HUD regulations in 24 CFR part 58, recipients of lead-based paint hazard control grants will assume Federal environmental review responsibilities. Recipients of a grant under this NOFA will be given guidance in these responsibilities. IX. Authority The Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Program is authorized by section 1011 of the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992 (Title X of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992). BILLING CODE 4210-32-P [[Page 9709]] [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN26FE99.027 BILLING CODE 4210-32-C [[Page 9711]] Notice of Funding Availability for Research to Improve the Evaluation and Control of Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazards Program Overview Purpose of the Program. To fund research to improve methods for detecting and controlling residential lead-based paint hazards. Available Funds. Approximately $2.5 million. Eligible Applicants. Academic and not-for-profit institutions located in the U.S., and State and local governments. For-profit firms also are eligible; however, they are not allowed to earn a fee (i.e., no profit can be made from the project). Application Deadline. May 26, 1999. Match. None. Additional Information If you are interested in applying for funding under this program, please review carefully the General Section of this SuperNOFA and the following additional information. I. Application Due Date, Application Kits, Further Information, and Technical Assistance Application Due Date. Submit an original and four copies of your completed application on or before 12:00 midnight Eastern time on May 26, 1999. See the General Section of this SuperNOFA for specific procedures that you must follow for the form of application submission (e.g., mailed applications, express mail, overnight delivery, or hand carried). Address for Submitting Applications. For Mailed Applications. The address for mailed applications is: Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, S.W., Room P3206, Washington, D.C. 20410. For Overnight/Express Mail or Hand Carried Applications. The address for overnight/express mail or hand carried applications is: HUD Office of Lead Hazard Control, 490 L'Enfant Plaza, SW, Suite 3206, Washington, DC 20024. For Application Kits. You may obtain an application kit from the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD-8929, or the TTY number at1- 800-483-2209. When requesting an application kit, please refer to the Lead Hazard Control Research grant program. Please be sure to provide your name, address (including zip code), and telephone number (including area code). For Further Information and Technical Assistance. For further information, you may contact: Dr. Peter Ashley, Office of Lead Hazard Control, at the address above; telephone (202) 755-1785, extension 115, or Ms. Karen Williams, Grants Officer, extension 118 (these are not toll-free numbers). Hearing- and speech-impaired persons may access the above telephone number via TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339. II. Amount Allocated Approximately $2.5 million will be available to fund research proposals in FY 1999. Grants or cooperative agreements will be awarded on a competitive basis according to the Rating Factors described in section V(B). HUD anticipates that individual awards will range from approximately $250,000 to approximately $1,000,000. III. Program Description; Eligible Applicants; Eligible Activities (A) Program Description Background. HUD has been actively engaged in a number of activities relating to lead-based paint as a result of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (LBPPPA) of 1971, as amended, 42 U.S.C. 4801- 4846. Sections 1051 and 1052 of the Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992 (``Title X'') (42 U.S.C. 4854 and 4854a) state that the Secretary of HUD, in cooperation with other Federal agencies, shall conduct research on specific topics related to the evaluation and subsequent mitigation of residential lead hazards. This research program also implements, in part, HUD's Departmental Strategy for Achieving Environmental Justice pursuant to Executive Order 12898 (Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations). The HUD-sponsored research also responds to recommendations that were made by the Task Force on Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction and Financing, which was established pursuant to section 1015 of Title X. The Task Force presented its final report to HUD and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in July 1995. The Task Force Report, entitled ``Putting the Pieces Together: Controlling Lead Hazards in the Nation's Housing'' (see Appendix A of this program section of the SuperNOFA), recommended research be conducted on a number of key topics to address significant gaps in our knowledge of lead exposure and hazard control. Research findings will be used in part to update HUD's Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint in Housing (``Guidelines''), which were published in June, 1995 (see Appendix A of this program section of the SuperNOFA). The Guidelines are a report on state-of-the-art procedures for all aspects of lead-based paint hazard evaluation and control. The Guidelines reflect the Title X framework for lead hazard control, which distinguishes three types of control measures: interim controls, abatement of lead-based paint hazards, and complete abatement of all lead-based paint. Interim controls are designed to address hazards quickly, inexpensively, and temporarily, while abatement is intended to produce a permanent solution. While the Guidelines recommend procedures that are effective in identifying and controlling lead hazards while protecting the health of abatement workers and occupants, HUD recognizes that targeted research and field experience will result in future changes to the Guidelines. (B) Eligible Applicants Academic and not-for-profit institutions located in the U.S., and State and local governments are eligible under all existing authorizations. Nonprofit institutions must submit proof of their nonprofit status. For-profit firms also are eligible; however, they are not allowed to earn a fee (i.e., no profit can be made from the project). Federal agencies and Federal employees are not eligible to submit applications. The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides additional eligibility requirements. (C) Eligible Activities (1) General Goals and Objectives. The overall goal of this research is to gain knowledge to improve the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of methods for lead-based paint hazard evaluation and control. Specific research topics for which applications are being solicited include: (a) Treatment of lead-contaminated residential soils; (b) Efficacy of the current guidance on conducting risk assessments of multifamily housing; and, (c) Other areas of research that are consistent with the overall goals of this program section of the SuperNOFA. Research objectives for the specific research topics listed above are provided separately in the expanded discussion of these topic areas that follows in Section III(C)(2). Although HUD is soliciting proposals for research on these specific topics, the Department will also consider funding applications for research on topics which are relevant under the overall goals and objectives of this research, as described above. In such instances, the applicant [[Page 9712]] should describe how the proposed research activity addresses these overall goals and objectives. (2) Background and Objectives for Specific Research Topic Areas. (a) Treatment of Lead-Contaminated Soils. (i) General. Soils can become lead contaminated as a result of the shedding of leaded paint from the exterior of structures and by the deposition of airborne particulate lead. Before the removal of lead from gasoline, vehicular emissions were a significant source of airborne lead, especially in urban areas. Children can be exposed to lead in soil and exterior dust through direct contact and incidental ingestion, and indirectly as a result of soil or dust being tracked or blown into the home and becoming incorporated into house dust. The degree to which soil-lead is a hazard depends upon the potential for contact and the lead concentration of the soil. The HUD Guidelines (Chapter 5) indicate that bare soils should be considered hazardous if they exceed 400 ppm Pb in ``high contact'' areas (e.g., play areas) and if they exceed 2,000 ppm Pb in other areas of the yard. The Guidelines further indicate that outside of high contact areas, hazard control measures are not required unless the surface area for bare soils exceeds 9 ft2. Requirements for soil-lead hazard assessment and controls in HUD's proposed rule implementing sections 1012 and 1013 of Title X (evaluation and control of lead hazards in federally assisted housing) are generally consistent with the HUD Guidelines. The Guidelines are also generally consistent with interim guidance for lead in soil published by the U.S. EPA (Guidance on the Identification of Lead-Based Paint Hazards, 60 FR 47247; September 11, 1995). The EPA has also recently proposed soil-lead standards, as required by section 403 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (63 FR 30302- 55; June 3, 1998). Soil-lead hazards can be mitigated using approaches that can be described as either interim controls or long term abatement measures (i.e., interventions that remain effective for at least 20 years). Interim controls include various means of covering bare soil, such as with grass, gravel, or mulch. Land use controls can also be employed and include measures such as fencing and changing the location of play equipment. Interim controls are generally low cost and relatively easy to employ; however, they require periodic monitoring to ensure that they remain effective. Current HUD guidance calls for residential soils to be abated if soil-lead levels exceed 5,000 ppm. Soil abatement includes such measures as covering soil with impervious materials like concrete or asphalt, or removing contaminated soils for off-site disposal. Another, more experimental approach, includes removing soil for on-site treatment that removes lead, followed by replacing the ``cleaned'' soil. Because of the high cost of soil abatement methods, in conjunction with other barriers to their implementation (e.g., disposing of lead-contaminated soils), these methods are currently impractical for widespread adoption. Other approaches to reducing soil-lead hazards cannot be readily characterized as either interim controls or soil abatement. An example, which has not been evaluated scientifically, is tilling the soil to reduce the lead concentration at the soil surface. Another example is the untested concept of treating soil with a substance (e.g., ground phosphate rock) that would be expected to reduce the biological availability (i.e., the degree to which the lead is absorbed into the bloodstream following ingestion) of the soil-lead to humans. Relatively little research has been reported on the effectiveness of residential soil treatments in reducing children's lead exposures. Some studies have reported significant reductions in the blood-lead levels of children following the implementation of interim soil hazard reduction measures in conjunction with other lead hazard control measures performed on dwelling interiors. However, this type of study design makes it difficult to parse out the effect of the soil hazard controls in reducing lead exposure. The EPA-funded ``Three City Study'' assessed the impact of residential or neighborhood soil and dust abatement on children's blood lead levels (USEPA 1996). A small decline in the mean blood lead of children was observed following soil abatement at one of the three study sites. The major goals of this research are to improve methods for assessing potential risks from soil-lead exposure, to determine the effectiveness of various interim control methods of reducing residential soil-lead hazards, and to identify novel, cost-effective approaches to reducing or eliminating residential soil-lead hazards. (ii) Specific Research Objectives. Specific research objectives include the following: (1) Assess the effectiveness of selected interim control methods at reducing or eliminating residential soil-lead hazards; (2) Develop and assess novel, cost-effective methods for reducing or eliminating residential soil-lead hazards; (3) Assess the adequacy of the current EPA (1994 interim guidelines and 1998 proposed rule) and HUD Guidelines for identifying residential soil-lead hazards (e.g., area of bare soil for a hazardous condition, soil sampling guidelines); and (4) Improve knowledge regarding the relative importance of exterior dust and soil as lead exposure sources for children in various residential environments. (b) Lead Hazard Risk Assessment of Multifamily Housing. (i) General. For the purpose of assessing residential housing for lead-based paint hazards, Title X defines a lead-based paint hazard risk assessment as an on-site investigation of a dwelling for the purpose of identifying any lead-based paint hazards. Risk assessments include, but are not limited to, a visual assessment and limited environmental sampling, and creation of a written report with results and recommendations. It is also suggested that a risk assessor, to the extent feasible, conduct an investigation of the history and management of a dwelling and the age of the residents. Chapter 5 of the HUD Guidelines provides guidance on conducting risk assessments in single and multifamily housing, and addresses painted surfaces, dust, and soil. The described approaches for conducting lead hazard risk assessments in multifamily housing include methods that are based on: (a) targeted, worst case, and random sampling of housing units and common areas when assessing painted surfaces and/or dust for lead-based paint hazards, and (b) sampling of selected locations of building properties when assessing soil for lead hazards. These aspects of risk assessment are addressed by the Guidelines as follows: Painted surfaces and dust Targeted sampling involves the selection of housing units and common areas deemed most likely to contain lead-based paint hazards. These units and common areas are identified primarily through information that is supplied by the owner (i.e., verbally and/or through written records). Examples of criteria for selecting units to be sampled include condition (e.g., select if ``poor''), the presence of children under age 6, and recent preparation for reoccupancy. One limitation of condition-based targeting is that most owners have little knowledge of lead risk assessment, and [[Page 9713]] may unintentionally fail to identify the units most likely to have LBP hazards; another arises from the potential conflict of interest of a risk assessor's reliance on the owner's characterization of the units and common areas. The Guidelines also provide a minimum number of units to be sampled in conducting risk assessments of similar multifamily units in developments of various sizes. The values provided were in part derived from a public housing risk assessment/insurance program. The other approaches discussed in the Guidelines for choosing units to be assessed, worst case and random sampling, are suggested for use when there is not adequate information on which to select a target sample. They would be more costly than the targeted approach in most cases. The worst-case sampling approach requires an initial visual inspection of all units and common areas with subsequent selection of those in poorest condition, while the random sampling method requires the random selection of a statistically based sample, as is required for conducting lead-based paint inspections. The statistically based random sample generally requires the selection of many more units than targeted sampling. A focused research effort is needed to assess the adequacy of the current HUD guidance for conducting risk assessments of multifamily developments. Research efforts could include the analysis of existing data from past risk assessments of multifamily developments (e.g., public housing) and/or the generation and analysis of new data generated from the assessment of a limited number of multifamily developments. As part of an evaluation of multifamily risk assessment guidance, consideration should be given as to how an assessor should characterize the results of a multifamily risk assessment in a manner that would maximize its utility to the client. If no lead hazards are identified, or if a clear pattern in the occurrence of lead hazards emerges, the reporting of results is straightforward. Other findings, however, such as the situation in which some lead hazards are detected with no apparent pattern of occurrence, are more difficult to characterize. Soil Chapter 5 of the HUD Guidelines recommends that bare soils be sampled during a risk assessment of multifamily housing; however, no additional guidance specific to multifamily housing is provided. The general guidance for soil sampling is to collect a minimum of two composite samples per building, with one sample collected from the children's play area and the other sample collected from the front or back yard and/or an additional sample from the foundation drip line. It would be useful to expand this guidance to cover a wider range of conditions, such as large-area properties with a few high-occupancy buildings and multiple areas of bare soil, or small properties for which play areas may not be distinct from other areas. Improving the clarity of identification and characterization of play areas would also improve the existing guidance. Another question relates to the possible sampling of exterior dust. Should exterior dust be sampled, and if so, using what protocol, and how should results be interpreted? (ii) Specific Research Objectives. The major objective is to assess the utility of the current HUD guidance on conducting lead-based paint hazard risk assessments in multifamily developments and to identify changes that could be made to improve this guidance. Specific research objectives include: (1) Assess the utility of a ``targeted sampling'' approach in identifying lead hazards in multifamily housing in contrast to other approaches (e.g., random sampling). (2) Evaluate the current guidance on the minimum number of units to be assessed in targeted risk assessments of multifamily housing. (3) Develop guidance to risk assessors on cost effective methods of determining the location of hazards in unsampled units when the pattern of hazard occurrence is uncertain based on sampled units. (4) Improve the guidance for conducting soil sampling in conjunction with risk assessments for a wide variety of multifamily housing. (c) Other Relevant Research. HUD will also consider funding applications for research on topics which, although not specifically identified in this program section of the SuperNOFA, are relevant under the overall objective of improving the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of methods for the evaluation and control of lead-based paint hazards. All applications must comply with all requirements of this program section of the SuperNOFA. Other research topics that are of interest to HUD include, but are not limited to: (i) Assessment of the level of worker protection required for typical lead hazard abatement and control activities (i.e., as determined by personal exposure monitoring) with respect to evaluations of the type of work, properties of the work surfaces, training and experience of workers and supervisors, etc. (ii) The degree to which it is necessary to follow the approach recommended in the HUD Guidelines (Chapter 14) for clean-up (e.g., washing walls and ceilings, use of a HEPA vacuum and high phosphate detergents) following the completion of various lead hazard control interventions. IV. Program Requirements. The threshold requirements are listed in Section II.B of the General Section of this SuperNOFA. V. Application Selection Process (A) Submitting Applications for Grants Your application must conform to the formatting guidelines specified in the application kit. This program section of the SuperNOFA specifies the sections to be included in the application and the application kit provides related formatting and content guidelines. Applications that meet all of the threshold requirements will be eligible to be scored and ranked, based on the total number of points allocated for each of the rating factors described below in section V(B). Your application must receive a total score of at least 65 points to remain in consideration for funding. HUD intends to make awards to qualifying applications in the following order: STEP 1 An award will be made to the highest ranked application in each of the three topic areas (including the ``other'' area) listed at sections III(C)(1)(a) through (c) of this program section of the SuperNOFA, within the limits of funding availability. If there are insufficient funds to award in all topic areas, HUD will make awards in topics (a) through (c) in rank order; STEP 2 If funding remains available, an award will be made to the second highest ranked application in each of the three topic areas listed at sections III.(C)(1)(a) through (c), within the limits of funding availability. STEP 3 If funding remains available, awards will be made in rank order regardless of topic area. You may address more than one of the research topic areas within your proposal; however, each topic area will be rated and ranked separately. Separate budgets should also be included for each of the topic areas, with the total cost not to exceed the total amount to be awarded. Projects need not address all of the objectives within a given topic area. While you will not be penalized for not addressing all of the specific objectives for a given topic area, if two applications for research in a given [[Page 9714]] topic have equal scores, HUD will select the applicant whose project addresses the most objectives. You are encouraged to plan projects that can be completed over a relatively short time period (e.g., 12 to 24 months from the date of award) so that any useful information that is generated from the research can be available for policy or program decisions and be disseminated to the public as quickly as possible. (B) Rating Factors. The factors for rating and ranking applicants, and maximum points for each factor, are provided below. The maximum number of points to be awarded is 102. This maximum includes two EZ/EC bonus points as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Also, Section III(C)(2) of the General Section, which addresses a court-ordered consideration, is applicable to this program. The application kit contains additional guidance for responding to these factors. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (20 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which you have the ability and organizational resources necessary to successfully implement the proposed activities in a timely manner. The rating of you, the ``applicant,'' will include any sub-grantees, consultants, sub- recipients, and members of consortia which are firmly committed to the project (generally, ``subordinate organizations''). In rating this factor HUD will consider the extent to which your application demonstrates: (1) The capability and qualifications of the principal investigator and key personnel (10 points). Qualifications to carry out the proposed study as evidenced by academic background, relevant publications, and recent (within the past 10 years) relevant research experience. Publications and research experience are considered relevant if they required the acquisition and use of knowledge and skills that can be applied in the planning and execution of the research that is proposed under this program section of the SuperNOFA. (2) Past performance of the research team in managing similar research (10 points). Demonstrated ability to successfully manage the various aspects of a complex research study in such areas as logistics, research personnel management, data management, quality control, community research involvement (if applicable), and report writing, as well as overall success in project completion (i.e., research completed on time and within budget). You should also demonstrate that the project would have adequate administrative support, including clerical and specialized support in areas such as accounting and equipment maintenance. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (15 Points) (1) You must demonstrate responsiveness to solicitation objectives. You should explain in detail the likelihood that the research would make a significant contribution towards achieving some or all of HUD's stated goals and objectives for one or more of the topic areas described in sections III(C)(2)(a)-(c) of this program section of the SuperNOFA. You also should explain how the proposed research could lead to improvements or additions to the HUD Guidelines. (b) If you are seeking funding for ``other'' research, as is described in section III(C)(2)(c), you must provide an explanation which demonstrates the importance and need for the research with respect to addressing the overall goal of this program section of the SuperNOFA (see section III(C)(1)). Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (45 Points) This factor addresses the quality of your proposed research plan. Specific components include the following: (1) Soundness of the study design (25 points). The study design must be thorough and feasible, and reflect your knowledge of the relevant scientific literature. You should include a plan for analyzing and archiving data. (2) Project management plan (10 points). The proposal should include a management plan that provides a schedule for the completion of major tasks and deliverables, with an indication that there will be adequate resources (e.g., personnel, financial) to successfully meet the proposed schedule. Projects with a duration of 24 months or less will be awarded more points in this category than projects with a longer duration. (3) Quality assurance mechanisms (5 points). You must describe the quality assurance mechanisms which will be integrated into your research design to ensure the validity and quality of the results. Areas to be addressed include acceptance criteria for data quality, procedures for selection of samples/sample sites, sample handling, measurement and analysis, and any standard/nonstandard quality assurance/control procedures to be followed. Documents (e.g., government reports, peer-reviewed academic literature) which provide the basis for the quality assurance mechanisms should be cited. (4) Budget Proposal (5 Points). The budget proposal should be thorough in the estimation of all applicable direct and indirect costs, and should be presented in a clear and coherent format in accordance with the requirements listed in the General Section of this SuperNOFA. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 Points) The extent to which you can demonstrate that the effectiveness of the HUD research grant funds is being increased by securing other public and/or private resources or by structuring the research in a cost-effective manner, such as integrating the project into an existing research effort. Resources may include funding or in-kind contributions (such as services, facilities or equipment) allocated to the purpose(s) of the research. Staff and in-kind contributions should be given a monetary value. You must provide evidence of leveraging/partnerships by including in the application letters of firm commitment, memoranda of understanding, or agreements to participate from those entities identified as partners in the application. Each letter of commitment, memorandum of understanding, or agreement to participate should include the organization's name, proposed level of commitment and responsibilities as they relate to the proposed program. The commitment must also be signed by an official of the organization legally able to make commitments on behalf of the organization. Rating Factor 5: Comprehensiveness and Coordination (10 Points) You should describe how the results of your proposed research efforts will support planning, policy development, implementation of lead hazard control programs, and/or public education in the area of residential lead hazard control. VII. Application Submission Requirements (A) Applicant Data Applications should be submitted in accordance with the format and instructions contained in this program section of the SuperNOFA. The following are required elements of the application (the application kit provides all necessary details and information): (1) Transmittal Letter that identifies what the program funds are requested [[Page 9715]] for, the dollar amount requested, and the applicant or applicants submitting the application. (2) The name, mailing address, telephone number, and principal contact person of the applicant. If the applicant has consortium associates, sub-grantees, partners, major subcontractors, joint venture participants, or others contributing resources to the project, similar information shall also be provided for each of these entities. (3) Completed Forms HUD-2880, Applicant/Recipient Disclosure/Update Report; Certification Regarding Lobbying; and SF-LLL, Disclosure of Lobbying Activities, where applicable. (4) Standard Forms SF-424, 424A, 424B, and other certifications and assurances listed in the General Section of the SuperNOFA and in section VII(B) of this program section of the SuperNOFA. (5) A detailed total budget with supporting cost justification for all budget categories of the Federal grant request. (6) A one-page abstract containing the following information: The project title, the names and affiliations of all investigators, and a summary of the objectives, expected results, and study design described in the proposal. (7) A project description that does not exceed 25 pages for each research topic area. (8) Any important attachments, appendices, references, or other relevant information may accompany the project description, but must not exceed fifteen (15) pages for the entire application. (9) A narrative statement addressing the rating factors for award of funding under this program section of the SuperNOFA. The narrative statement must be numbered in accordance with each factor for award (Factor 1 through 5). The response to the rating factors should not exceed a total of 20 pages for each research topic area. (See application kit for format and required elements.) (10) The resumes of the principal investigator and other key personnel. Resumes shall not exceed three pages, and are limited to information that is relevant in assessing the qualifications of key personnel to conduct and/or manage the proposed research. (11) Copy of State Clearing House Approval Notification (see application kit to determine if applicable). (B) Certifications and Assurances. The following certifications and assurances are to be included in all applications: (1) Compliance with all relevant State and Federal regulations regarding exposure to and proper disposal of hazardous materials. (2) Assurance that the financial management system meets the standards for fund control and accountability (24 CFR 84.21 or 24 CFR 85.20, as applicable); (3) Assurance, to the extent possible and applicable, that any blood lead testing, blood lead level test results, and medical referral and follow-up for children under six years of age will be conducted according to the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children, See Appendix A of this program section of the SuperNOFA); (4) Assurance that HUD research grant funds will not replace existing resources dedicated to any ongoing project; and (5) Certification of compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 in accordance with the requirements set forth at 24 CFR part 24. (6) Assurance that laboratory analysis covered by the National Lead Laboratory Accreditation Program (NLLAP) is conducted by a laboratory recognized under the program. (7) Assurance that human research subjects will be protected from research risks in conformance with the Common Rule (Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, codified by HUD at 24 CFR part 60). VIII. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. IX. Environmental Requirements In accordance with 24 CFR 50.19(b)(1) and (5) of the HUD regulations, activities assisted under this program are categorically excluded from the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321) and are not subject to environmental review under the related laws and authorities. X. Authority These grants are authorized under sections 1051 and 1052 of the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992, which is Title X of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992. Appendix A--Relevant Publications and Guidelines To secure any of the documents listed, call the listed telephone number (generally, the telephone numbers are not toll-free). Regulations 1. Worker Protection: OSHA publication--Telephone: 202-693-1888 (OSHA Regulations) (available for a charge)--Government Printing Office--Telephone: 202-512-1800 (not a toll-free number): --General Industry Lead Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1025; (Document Number 869022001124) --Lead Exposure in Construction, 29 CFR 1926.62, and appendices A, B, C, and D; (Document Number 869022001141) 2. Waste Disposal: 40 CFR parts 260-268 (EPA regulations) (available for a charge)--Telephone 1-800-424-9346, or, from the Washington, DC, metropolitan area, 1-703-412-9810 (not a toll-free number). 3. Lead; Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities; Final Rule: 40 CFR Part 745, Subparts L and Q (EPA) (State Certification and Accreditation Program for those engaged in lead-based paint activities)-- Telephone: 1-202-554-1404 (Toxic Substances Control Act Hotline) (not a toll-free number). 4. Requirements for Notification, Evaluation and Reduction of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Property and Housing Receiving Federal Assistance; Proposed Rule: 24 CFR Parts 35, 36 and 37 (HUD)--Telephone: 1-202-755-1785 (Office of Lead Hazard Control) (not a toll-free number). 5. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Lead; Identification of Dangerous Levels of Lead; Proposed Rule. Federal Register: 63 FR 30302-30355, June 3, 1998. TSCA Hotline: 202-554-1404 (not a toll- free number). Guidelines 1. Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing; HUD, June 1995 (available for a charge)-- Telephone: 800-245-2691: 2. Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children; Centers for Disease Control, October 1991: Telephone: 888-232-6789. 3. Screening Young Children for Lead Poisoning: Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials, November 1997; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Telephone: 888-232-6789. Reports 1. Putting the Pieces Together: Controlling Lead Hazards in the Nation's Housing, (Summary and Full Report); HUD, July 1995 (available for a charge)--Telephone 800-245-2691. 2. Comprehensive and Workable Plan for the Abatement of Lead- Based Paint in Privately Owned Housing: Report to Congress; HUD, December 7, 1990 (available for a charge)--Telephone 800-245-2691. 3. A Field Test of Lead-Based Paint Testing Technologies: Summary Report (Summary also available); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, May 1995. EPA 747-R-95-002a (available at no charge)--Telephone 800-424-5323. 4. Urban Soil Lead Abatement Demonstration Project. EPA Integrated Report, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, April, 1996. EPA/600/P-93-001AF (available from National Technical Information Service (NTIS) for a charge)--Telephone 800-553-6847. BILLING CODE 4210-32-P [[Page 9717]] [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN26FE99.028 BILLING CODE 4210-32-C [[Page 9719]] Funding Availability for Interventions to Control Mold and Moisture Problems in Inner-City Housing Program Overview Purpose of the Program. The purpose of the program is to assist State and local governments in undertaking demonstration projects of preventive measures to correct mold and moisture problems in inner-city housing occupied by families with young children in communities where exposure to toxigenic molds has been linked to cases of acute pulmonary hemorrhage and death in infants. Available Funds. Approximately $4.0 million. Eligible Applicants. State or local governments. Application Deadline. May 26, 1999. Match. None. Additional Information I. Application Due Date, Application Kits, Further Information, and Technical Assistance Application Due Date. Submit an original and four copies of your completed application on or before 12:00 midnight Eastern Time on May 26, 1999. The General Section of the SuperNOFA provides additional information regarding the delivery methods for the applications. Address for Submitting Applications. For Mailed Applications. The address for mailed applications is: Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Room P3206, Washington, D.C. 20410. For Overnight/Express Mail or Hand Carried Applications. The address for applications that are hand carried or sent via overnight delivery is : HUD Office of Lead Hazard Control, Suite 3206, 490 L'Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, D.C. 20024. For Application Kits. You may obtain an application kit from the SuperNOFA Information Center at 1-800-HUD-8929, or the TTY number at 1- 800-483-2209. When requesting an application kit, please refer to ``Interventions to Control Mold and Moisture.'' Please be sure to provide your name, address (including zip code), and telephone number (including area code). Alternatively, you may obtain an application kit by downloading it from the internet at http://www.hud.gov. For Further Information Contact. Dr. Peter Ashley, Planning and Standards Division, Office of Lead Hazard Control, at the address above; telephone (202) 755-1785, extension 115, or Ms. Karen Williams, Grants Officer, extension 118 (these are not toll-free numbers). Hearing- and speech-impaired persons may access the above telephone numbers via TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 1-800-877-8339. II. Amount Allocated Approximately $4.0 million will be available to fund demonstration projects in FY 1999. Grants will be awarded on a competitive basis following evaluation of all proposals according to the Rating Factors described in section V(B). HUD anticipates that approximately 1 to 3 grants will be awarded, ranging from approximately $1,500,000 to approximately $4,000,000. III. Program Description, Eligible Applicants, and Eligible Activities (A) Program Description (1) Background. (a) Molds (filamentous fungi) can grow on and within various substrates within a home following water intrusion as a result of events such as flooding and plumbing and roof leaks. Of particular concern is the growth of molds that are capable of forming toxic substances (i.e., toxigenic molds). Exposure to molds and their toxic byproducts can be hazardous to humans through direct contact with the skin, ingesting mold-contaminated foods, or by inhaling mold particles. Such exposures have been associated with a variety of symptoms, including rashes, fever, headache, upper respiratory infection, asthma, chronic fatigue, and in severe cases, death (Croft et al. 1986, Johanning et al. 1996). One of the most hazardous of the toxigenic molds is Stachybotrys chartarum. Stachybotrys is a greenish-black mold that grows on water- soaked, cellulose-containing materials such as wood paneling, ceiling tiles, paper products, and some types of insulation. An association was found between the presence of this mold in water-damaged homes in a large, midwestern city, and the occurrence of acute pulmonary hemorrhage in infants, leading to death in some cases (Etzel et al. 1998; MMWR 1994, 1997). Air sampling conducted in the homes of the disease cases also identified considerably higher concentrations of other varieties of mold in the homes of victims as compared to control homes. The cases were found to be geographically clustered in an area of the city with housing that is old and often times inadequately maintained, with evidence of water damage and chronic moisture problems. A cluster of cases of acute infant pulmonary hemorrhage was also reported in another U.S. city; however, no epidemiological study of potential causative environmental agents has been published (MMWR 1995). Inspection of homes for mold problems can include visual survey for mold and water damage, bulk and surface sampling of contaminated materials, and air monitoring. Mold is especially serious when substantial amounts are found to occur in air ducts that are part of the home heating system. Heating ducts provide a means for the wide distribution of mold particulates throughout the house. To be effective, any remediation strategy must include elimination of moisture intrusion into the home. Because water damage and mold growth are most likely to occur in older housing, as has been reported, it is likely that the affected dwellings also contain lead-based paint which could be in a deteriorated condition. Therefore, any remediation strategy for mold growth should include the identification and control of lead-based paint hazards. Remediation workers must be trained to work safely in mold-contaminated environments as well as in safe methods for lead hazard control. Precautions also must be taken to adequately protect occupants during interventions. (b) References. See Appendix A. (2) Goals and Objectives. The primary goal of this program is to protect children by supporting one or more demonstration projects employing cost-effective, replicable interventions to remediate moisture intrusion and associated mold growth in inner-city housing occupied by families with young children in communities where toxic mold exposure has been linked to acute pulmonary hemorrhage in infants (``eligible housing''). Objectives include the following: (a) Developing a cost-effective survey protocol for identifying homes that are candidates for moisture control interventions, identifying lead-based paint and other hazards associated with moisture intrusion, and screening out homes where structural or other condition factors make interventions infeasible or impractical. (b) Developing a flexible set of intervention strategies that take into account the range of conditions likely to be encountered in older inner-city housing, and the need to maximize the number of housing units that receive an intervention. (c) Developing an efficient strategy for evaluating the effectiveness of interventions in preventing moisture intrusion and controlling mold growth. (d) Building local capacity to develop a sustainable program that will continue to prevent and, where they occur, minimize and control toxic mold [[Page 9720]] hazards in low and very-low income residences when HUD funding is exhausted. (e) Affirmatively furthering fair housing and environmental justice. (f) Mobilizing public and private resources, involving cooperation among all levels of government, the private sector, and community-based organizations to develop the most promising, cost-effective methods for identifying and controlling moisture problems and associated mold hazards in inner city housing. (g) Integrating mold- and lead-safe work practices into housing maintenance, repair, and improvements. (h) To the greatest extent feasible, promoting job training, employment, and other economic opportunities for low-income and minority residents and businesses which are owned by and/or employ low- income and minority residents as defined in 24 CFR 135.5 (See 59 FR 33881, June 30, 1994). (B) Eligible Applicants To apply for funding under this announcement, you must be a State or unit of local government. Multiple units of local government (or multiple local governments) may apply as part of a consortium; however, a single lead government or agency must be identified and that agency will be considered ``the applicant.'' Only one application may be submitted from each applicant. If your name appears as lead agency in multiple applications, this will be considered a curable (minor) defect. HUD will request that you clarify which application you want HUD to consider as your application. If you fail to respond, any application in which you are identified as the lead agency will be returned unevaluated. (C) Eligible Activities You will be afforded considerable latitude in designing and implementing the interventions to prevent moisture intrusion and remediate existing mold hazards. However, in developing a strategy, you should use all reasonably available sources of information on controlling moisture and associated mold problems in buildings and protecting workers and occupants during and after the intervention process. HUD is interested in promoting housing intervention approaches that result in the reduction of this health threat for the maximum number of residents, and in particular low-income residents, and that demonstrate replicable techniques which are cost-effective and efficient. The following direct and support activities are eligible under this grant program. (1) Direct Project Elements (activities conducted by you and any sub-recipients): (a) Performing evaluations of eligible housing to determine the presence of moisture intrusion and related conditions (e.g., mold growth, damaged lead-based paint) through the use of generally accepted testing procedures. (b) Conducting medical examinations of young children for conditions caused or exacerbated by mold exposure where this is considered essential to your project, and there are no alternative sources to cover these costs. (c) Conducting housing interventions to remediate existing mold growth and address conditions that could result in the recurrence of mold growth by preventing the intrusion of moisture into a dwelling. Any lead hazard evaluation and control work shall be conducted in accordance with the HUD Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing (``Guidelines''). (d) Carrying out temporary relocation of families and individuals during the period in which intervention is conducted and until the time the affected unit receives clearance for reoccupancy. (e) Performing medical testing recommended by a physician or applicable occupational or public health agency for individuals working with toxic molds and air sampling to protect the health of the intervention workers, supervisors, and contractors. (f) Undertaking housing rehabilitation activities that are specifically required to carry out effective control of moisture intrusion and mold hazards, and without which the intervention could not be completed and maintained. Grant funds under this program may also be used to control immediate lead-based paint hazards. (g) Conducting clearance testing and analysis for lead and/or mold, as appropriate. (h) Carrying out architectural, engineering and work specification development and other construction management services necessary to, and in direct support of, activities to control moisture problems and remediate existing mold and/or lead hazards. (i) Providing training on safe maintenance practices to homeowners, renters, painters, remodelers, and housing maintenance staff working in low- or very-low income housing. (j) Providing cleaning supplies for mold-hazard intervention and lead-hazard control to community/neighborhood-based organizations for use by homeowners and renters in low income housing, or to such homeowners, and renters directly, in conjunction with training under section III.(C)(1)(i), or as part of research activities under section III.(C)(1)(n) of this program section of this SuperNOFA. (k) Conducting general or targeted community awareness or education programs on environmental health hazards associated with moisture intrusion. This activity would include training on safe maintenance and renovation practices. It would also include making materials available, upon request, in alternative formats for persons with disabilities (e.g., Braille, audio, large type), and in languages other than English that are common in the community, whenever possible. (l) Securing liability insurance for mold-intervention and lead- hazard evaluation and control activities to be performed. (m) Supporting data collection, analysis, and evaluation of project activities. This activity is separate from administrative costs. (n) Conducting applied research activities directed at demonstration of cost-effective evaluation and intervention methods for preventing moisture intrusion into dwellings and abating associated mold hazards, particularly in conjunction with concurrently evaluating and controlling other moisture-related environmental health hazards. (o) Presenting research findings at a scientific conference in each project year after the first. (p) Maintaining a registry (updated at least monthly) of housing units in which moisture problems, mold hazards and lead hazards were not found during evaluation, or in which such problems and hazards have been controlled. (q) Preparing quarterly progress reports, interim and final research reports, and an overall final grant report detailing activities, findings, conclusions and recommendations, at the conclusion of grant activities. (2) Support Elements. (a) Your administrative costs. (b) Program planning and management costs of sub-grantees and other sub-recipients. (D) Ineligible Activities Program funds shall not be used for: (1) Purchase of real property. (2) Purchase or lease of equipment having a per unit cost in excess of $5,000, except upon approval by HUD. (3) Medical treatment costs for children with illness associated with [[Page 9721]] exposure to molds or for children with elevated blood lead levels, except as part of research activities under section III.(C)(1)(n), above, in this program section of the SuperNOFA. IV. Program Requirements In addition to the program requirements listed in the General Section of this SuperNOFA, applicants are subject to the following requirements: (A) Budgeting. Administrative Costs. There is a 10% maximum for administrative costs. The application kit contains specific information on allowable administrative costs. (B) Period of Performance. The period of performance cannot exceed 36 months. (C) Coastal Barrier Resources Act. Pursuant to the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (16 U.S.C. 3501), funds may not be used for properties located in the Coastal Barrier Resources System. (D) Flood Disaster Protection Act. Under the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (42 U.S.C. 4001-4128), funds may not be used for construction, reconstruction, repair or improvement of a building or mobile home which is located in an area identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as having special flood hazards unless: (1) The community in which the area is situated is participating in the National Flood Insurance Program in accordance with the applicable regulations (44 CFR parts 59-79), or less than a year has passed since FEMA notification regarding these hazards; and (2) Where the community is participating in the National Flood Insurance Program, flood insurance on the property is obtained in accordance with section 102(a) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act (42 U.S.C. 4012a(a)). You are responsible for assuring that flood insurance is obtained and maintained for the appropriate amount and term. (E) National Historic Preservation Act. The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470) (NHPA) and the regulations at 36 CFR part 800 apply to the mold intervention and related hazard control activities that are undertaken pursuant to this program. HUD and the Advisory Council for Historic Preservation have developed an optional Model Agreement for use by grantees and State Historic Preservation Officers in carrying out any lead hazard control activities under this program. (F) Waste Disposal. Waste disposal will be handled according to the requirements of OSHA (e.g., 29 CFR part 1910 and/or 1926, as applicable), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (e.g., 40 CFR parts 61, 260-299, 300-399, and/or 700-799, as applicable), the Department of Transportation (e.g., 49 CFR parts 171-177), and/or appropriate State or local regulatory agency(ies). Disposal of wastes from intervention activities that contain lead-based paint but are not classified as hazardous will be handled in accordance with the HUD Guidelines. (G) Worker Protection Procedures. You must comply with the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA; e.g., 29 CFR part 1910 and/or 1926, as applicable), or the State or local occupational safety and health regulations, whichever are most stringent. (H) Written Policies and Procedures. You must have written policies and procedures for all phases of intervention, including evaluation, development of specifications, financing, occupant relocation, independent project inspection, and clearance testing (for mold and/or lead, as applicable). You and all your subcontractors, sub-recipients, and their contractors must comply with these policies and procedures. (I) Continued Availability of Safe Housing to Low-Income Families. Units in which mold hazards have been controlled under this program shall be occupied by and/or continue to be available to low-income residents. (J) Data collection and provision. You must collect, maintain and provide to HUD the data necessary to document the various approaches used to evaluate and control mold and lead hazards, including evaluation and control methods, building conditions, medical and familial information (with confidentiality of individually-identifiable information ensured) in order to determine the effectiveness and relative cost of these methods. (K) Section 3 Employment Opportunities. Please see Section II(E) of the General Section of this SuperNOFA. The requirements of Section 3 are applicable to this program. (L) Certifications and Assurances. In addition to the certifications and assurances listed in the General Section of the SuperNOFA, a single certification form is included in the application kit. This includes: (1) An assurance in accordance with 24 CFR 50.3(h) that the applicant will carry out its responsibilities regarding HUD's environmental review. (2) A certification of compliance with the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970, and the implementing regulations at 49 CFR 24; and HUD Handbook 1378 (Tenant Assistance, Relocation and Real Property Acquisition). (3) An assurance that the applicant's financial management system meets the standards for fund control and accountability described in 24 CFR 85.20. (4) An assurance that any pre-intervention and clearance evaluation for lead will be conducted by certified performers. (5) An assurance that project funds obtained through this SuperNOFA will not replace existing resources dedicated to any ongoing project. (6) Assurance that human research subjects will be protected from research risks in conformance with the Common Rule (Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, codified by HUD at 24 CFR part 60). (M) Davis-Bacon Act. The Davis-Bacon Act does not apply to this program. However, if program funds are used in conjunction with other Federal programs in which Davis-Bacon prevailing wage rates apply, then Davis-Bacon provisions would apply to the extent required under the other Federal programs. V. Application Selection Process (A) Rating and Ranking HUD intends to fund the highest ranked applications within the limits of funding. Once available funds have been allocated to meet the requested or negotiated amounts of the top eligible applicants, HUD reserves the right, in successive order, to offer any residual amount as partial funding to the next eligible applicant provided HUD, in its sole judgment, is satisfied that the residual amount is sufficient to support a viable, though reduced effort. (B) Factors for Award Used to Evaluate and Rate Applications This section provides the factors for rating and ranking your application and the maximum points for each factor. The application kit provides additional instructions for responding to these factors. The maximum number of points to be awarded is 102. This maximum includes two EZ/EC bonus points as described in the General Section of the SuperNOFA. Also, Section III(C)(2) of the General Section, which addresses a court-ordered consideration, is applicable to this program. Rating Factor 1: Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Experience (20 Points) This factor addresses your organizational capacity necessary to [[Page 9722]] successfully implement your proposed activities in a timely manner. The rating of you or your staff includes any community-based organizations, sub-contractors, consultants, sub-recipients, and members of consortia that are firmly committed to your project. In rating this factor HUD will consider: (1) Your recent, relevant and successful demonstrated experience in undertaking eligible program activities. You must describe the knowledge and experience of the proposed overall project director and day-to-day program manager in planning and managing large and complex interdisciplinary programs, especially those involving housing rehabilitation, public health, or environmental programs. In your narrative response for this factor, you should include information on your program staff, their experience, commitment to the program, and position titles. Resumes of up to three (3) pages each and position descriptions for up to three personnel in addition to the project director and program manager, and a clearly delineated organizational chart for your project must be included as an appendix. Copies of job announcements (including salary range) should be included for any key positions that are currently vacant. Indicate the percentage of time that key personnel will devote to your project and any salary costs to be paid by funds from this program. (2) Whether you have sufficient personnel or will be able to quickly retain qualified experts or professionals to begin your proposed program immediately and to perform your proposed activities in a timely and effective fashion. Describe how other principal components of your agency or other organizations will participate in or support your project. You should thoroughly describe capacity, as demonstrated by experience in initiating and implementing related environmental, health, or housing projects. Rating Factor 2: Need/Extent of the Problem (15 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which there is a need for your proposed program activities to address a documented problem in your target inner city area(s). (1) Document a critical level of need for your proposed activities in the inner city area where activities will be carried out. You should pay specific attention to documenting need as it applies to your target area(s), rather than the larger geographic area. (2) Your documentation of need should summarize available data linking toxigenic mold growth with cases of acute pulmonary hemorrhage in infants in your target area(s). Examples of supporting data that might be used to demonstrate need, include: (a) Economic and demographic data relevant to your target area(s), including poverty and unemployment rates; (b) Rates of childhood illnesses (e.g., asthma) that could be caused or exacerbated by mold exposure, among children residing in your target area(s), and rates of environmental intervention blood lead levels in your target area(s); (c) Lack of other Federal, State or local funding that could be, or is used, to address the problem HUD program funds are designed to address. (3) For the areas targeted for your project activities, provide data available in your jurisdiction's currently approved Consolidated Plan, or derived from 1990 Census Data, or derived from other sources (all data should be documented): (a) The age and condition of housing; (b) The number and percentage of very-low and low income families with incomes less than 80% of the median income, as determined by HUD, for the area, with adjustments for smaller and larger families (See application kit for additional information.); (c) The number and proportion of children under six years old. (4) Describe how proposed research activities would help HUD achieve its goals for this program area of this SuperNOFA. (5) There must be a direct relationship between the proposed activities, community needs, and the purpose of the program. Rating Factor 3: Soundness of Approach (45 Points) This factor addresses the quality and cost-effectiveness of your proposed work plan. You should present information on the proposed approach for controlling moisture intrusion and remediating existing mold problems. The response to this factor should include the following elements: (1) Intervention Strategy (30 points). Describe the strategy you will use in planning and executing the moisture control and mold hazard interventions in inner city housing. You should provide information on: (a) Strategy for Implementing the Demonstration Project (10 points). Describe your overall strategy for your proposed demonstration project. The description must include a discussion of: (i) Your previous experience in reducing or eliminating mold and moisture problems in urban housing (if any). (ii) Your overall strategy for identifying, selecting, prioritizing, and enrolling units of eligible housing in which you will undertake mold and moisture control. Describe the extent to which your proposed activities will occur in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community (EZ/EC), if applicable. (iii) The estimated total number of owner occupied and/or rental units in which you will conduct interventions. (iv) The degree to which your work plan focuses on eligible privately-owned and/or publicly-owned housing units with young children. Describe your planned approach to control moisture, mold and other environmental health problems associated with moisture intrusion before children are affected; and/or to control these hazards in units where children have already been treated for illnesses associated with mold exposure (e.g., acute pulmonary hemorrhage, asthma). Describe the process for your referral of ill children for medical case management if this is not ongoing. (v) The financing strategy, including eligibility requirements, terms, conditions, and amounts available, to be employed in conducting mold and moisture control activities. You must discuss the way funds will be administered (e.g., use of grants, deferred loans, forgivable loans, other resources, private sector financing, etc.) as well as the agency which will administer the process. Describe how your proposed project will further and support the policy priorities of the Department, including promoting Healthy Homes; providing opportunities for self-sufficiency, particularly for persons enrolled in welfare-to- work programs; or providing educational and job training opportunities. (b) Outreach and Community Involvement (5 points). You must describe: (i) Proposed methods of community education. These should include community awareness, education, training, and outreach programs in support of your work plan and objectives. This should include general and/or targeted efforts undertaken to assist your efforts in reducing exposure to residential mold hazards. To the extent possible, programs should be culturally sensitive, targeted, and linguistically appropriate. (ii) Proposed involvement of neighborhood or community-based organizations in the proposed activities. These activities may include outreach, community education, marketing, [[Page 9723]] inspection, and housing evaluations and interventions. (c) Technical Approach for Conducting Mold and Moisture Interventions (15 points) (i) Describe your process for evaluating units of eligible housing in which you will undertake moisture control and mold removal. (ii) Describe any specialized testing or visual inspection that you will conduct during unit inspection with reference to source(s) of the protocol(s). Describe qualifications and experience requirements for laboratories, which shall include, as applicable, successful participation in the Clinical Laboratory Program, National Lead Laboratory Accreditation Program, and/or National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program. (iii) Describe the mold and moisture control interventions you will undertake. Provide an estimate of the per unit costs (and a basis for those estimates) for the type of interventions that are planned. Provide a schedule for initiating and conducting interventions in the selected units. Discuss efforts to incorporate cost-effective control methods to address other environmental health hazards resulting from water damage (e.g., deteriorating lead-based paint, damaged asbestos- containing materials). Work should be conducted in accordance with the HUD Guidelines in units where lead hazards are identified. (iv) Describe your process for the development of work specifications for selected interventions. Describe your management processes to be used to ensure the cost-effectiveness of the housing interventions. Discuss your contracting process to obtain contractors to conduct interventions in selected units. (v) Describe your plan for the temporary relocation of occupants of units selected for intervention, and how you will determine the need for relocation. Address the use of safe houses and other housing arrangements, storage of household goods, stipends, incentives, etc. (2) Economic Opportunity (5 points) Describe methods that will result in economic opportunities for residents and businesses in the community where activities will be carried out. Include information on how you will provide employment, business development, and contract opportunities. Describe how you or your partners will satisfy the requirements of Section 3 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 to give preference to hiring low- and very low-income persons or contracting with businesses owned by or employing low-and very-low income persons. (3) Program Evaluation and Research (10 points). (a) Identify and discuss the specific methods you will use to measure progress, and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Describe how the information will be obtained, documented, and reported. (b) Provide a detailed description of your proposed applied research activities. Your research designs should be feasible and display thorough knowledge of relevant scientific literature. They should include an appropriate plan for managing, analyzing and archiving data. Also, quality assurance mechanisms must be well integrated into your research design to ensure the validity and quality of collected data. (4) Budget (Not Scored). Your proposed budget will be evaluated for the extent to which it is reasonable, clearly justified, and consistent with the intended use of program funds. HUD is not required to approve or fund all proposed activities. You must thoroughly document and justify all budget categories and costs (Part B of Standard Form 424A) and all major tasks. Describe in detail your budgeted costs for each required program element (major task) included in your overall plan. The four required program elements are: administration; education and outreach; control of mold and moisture-related hazards (including sampling); and program evaluation and applied research. (5) Court-Ordered Consideration. Due to an order of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas, Dallas Division, HUD will award up to two (2) additional points to an application submitted by the City of Dallas, Texas, to the extent the application's proposed activities will eradicate the vestiges of racial segregation in the Dallas Housing Authority's programs consistent with the Court's order. Rating Factor 4: Leveraging Resources (10 Points) This factor addresses your ability to secure other community resources (such as financing, supplies or services) which can be combined with HUD's resources to achieve project purposes. (1) In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider the extent to which you have partnered with other entities to secure additional resources to increase the effectiveness of your proposed project. Resources may include funding or in-kind contributions (such as services or equipment) allocated to your proposed program. Resources may be provided by governmental entities, public or private organizations, or other entities willing to be your partner in this effort. (2) Each source of contributions must be supported by a letter of commitment from the contributing entity, whether a public or private source, which must describe the contributed resources that will be used in your program. Staff in-kind contributions should be given a market- based monetary value. If you fail to provide letters of commitment with specific details including the amount of the actual contributions, you will not get rating points for this factor. Each letter of commitment, memorandum of understanding, or agreement to participate shall include the organization's name and the proposed level of commitment and responsibilities as they relate to the proposed program. The commitment must be signed by an official legally able to make commitments on behalf of the organization. Rating Factor 5: Comprehensiveness and Coordination (10 Points) This factor addresses the extent to which your program reflects a coordinated, community-based process of identifying needs and building a system to address the needs by using available HUD and other community resources. In evaluating this factor, HUD will consider: (1) The degree of coordination of your proposed project with those of other groups or organizations to best support and coordinate all activities, and the specific steps you will take to share information on solutions and outcomes with others. Any written agreements or memoranda of understanding in place must be described. (2) The extent to which you have developed linkages, or the specific steps you will take to develop linkages, to coordinate your activities so solutions are holistic and comprehensive. Linkages include linkages with other HUD, Federal, State or locally funded activities through meetings, information networks, planning processes, or other means. (3) The degree of coordination with housing rehabilitation, housing and health codes, and other related housing programs. (a) Describe your plan for integrating and coordinating mold and moisture control interventions with other housing-related activities (e.g., lead hazard control, rehabilitation, weatherization, removal of code violations, and other similar work). (b) Describe your plans to incorporate mold and moisture control interventions [[Page 9724]] with applicable housing codes and health regulations. (c) Describe your plans to generate and use public subsidies or other resources (such as revolving loan funds) to finance future interventions to prevent and control mold hazards, particularly in low- and very-low-income housing. (d) Detail the extent to which you will ensure that the needs of minorities and persons with disabilities will be addressed adequately during your intervention activities; and that housing in which mold and moisture problems have been addressed will still be available and affordable for low income minority and disabled individuals. VI. Application Submission Requirements (A) Applicant Information You should submit your application in accordance with the format and instructions contained in this program section of this SuperNOFA. The following is a checklist of required application contents: (1) Transmittal letter that summarizes your proposed program, provides the dollar amount requested, and identifies you and your partners in the application. (2) The name, mailing address, telephone number, and principal contact person. If you are a consortium of associates, sub-recipients, partners, major subcontractors, joint venture participants, or others contributing resources to the project, similar information shall also be provided for each of these entities and you must specify the lead entity. (3) Completed Forms HUD-2880, Applicant/Recipient Disclosure/Update Report; Certification Regarding Lobbying; and SF-LLL, Disclosure of Lobbying Activities, where applicable. (4) Standard Forms SF-424, 424A, 424B, and other certifications and assurances listed in the General Section of the SuperNOFA and in this program section of the SuperNOFA (see application kit). (5) A narrative statement addressing the rating factors for award. The narrative statement must be numbered in accordance with each factor for award (Factor 1 through 5). The response to the rating factors should not exceed a total of 30 pages. (6) Any attachments, appendices, references, or other relevant information may accompany the project description, but must not exceed fifteen (15) pages for your entire application. (7) A detailed budget with supporting cost justification for all budget categories of your funding request. (8) The resumes and position descriptions of your project director and program manager and up to three additional key personnel. VII. Corrections to Deficient Applications The General Section to this SuperNOFA provides the procedures for corrections to deficient applications. VIII. Environmental Requirements Activities assisted under this program are subject to HUD environmental review to the extent required under 24 CFR part 50. An award under the Mold and Moisture Control Program does not constitute approval of specific sites where activities may be carried out. Following award execution, HUD will perform environmental reviews for activities to be carried out on properties proposed by your organization. You may not rehabilitate, convert, repair or construct a property, or commit or expend program funds or non-HUD funds for program activities for any eligible property until you receive written notification from the appropriate HUD official that HUD has completed its environmental review and the property has been approved. The results of environmental reviews may require that proposed activities be modified or proposed sites rejected. IX. Authority This program is authorized by the Fiscal Year 1999 Appropriations Act. Appendix A References Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Acute pulmonary hemorrhage/hemosiderosis among infants: Cleveland, January 1993- November 1994. MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 1994; 43(48):881-883. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Acute pulmonary hemorrhage among infants--Chicago, April 1992-November 1994. MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 1995; 44(4):67. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Update: Pulmonary hemorrhage/hemosiderosis among infants--Cleveland, Ohio, 1993-1996. MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 1997; 46(2):33-35. Croft, W.A., B.B. Jarvis and C.S. Yatawara. 1986. Airborne outbreak of trichothene toxicosis. Atmospheric Environment. 20: 549-552. Etzel, R.A., E. Montana, W.G. Sorenson, G. Kullman, T.M. Allan, and D.G. Dearborn. 1998. Acute pulmonary hemorrhage in infants associated with exposure to Stachybotrys chartarum and other fungi. Arch. Pediatr. Adolesc. Med. 152: 757-762. Johanning, E., R. Biagini, D. Hull, P. Morey, et al. 1996. Health and immunology study following exposure to toxigenic fungi (Stachybotrys chartarum) in a water-damaged office environment. Int. Arch. Occup. Environ. Health. 68:207-218. BILLING CODE 4210-32-P [[Page 9725]] [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TN26FE99.029 BILLING CODE 4210-32-C [[Page 9727]]