Louisville, KY

Baptist Homes accused of forced religion

May 02, 2007
Children in a state-funded Baptist social-services program claimed in dozens of exit interviews that they were forced into Christian or specifically Baptist practices or were discouraged from practicing their own religion, according to court records.
     The interviews came to light as part of a lawsuit filed by a fired employee and four other taxpayers who are challenging state funding for Kentucky Baptist Homes for Children.

Fair housing, school diversity, an integrated society

February 07, 2007
With the U.S. Supreme Court likely to strike down voluntary school desegregation programs in Seattle and Louisville (Parents v. Seattle/Meredith v. Jefferson County), the best next option for those committed to an open, integrated society is an emboldened fair housing movement.
     Continued high levels of segregation in the nation's neighborhoods, fueled primarily by persistent discrimination in the housing market, will condemn a majority of public school students to a segregated and inferior education in the absence of either voluntary school desegregation initiatives or more integrated housing patterns.

Group-home dispute gets heated

January 16, 2007
A dispute over a group home that Brooklawn Child & Family Services wants to open off Newburg Road has split the neighborhood and has Louisville Metro Councilman Jim King -- who lives nearby -- warning of "nuclear war."
     The heated rhetoric and intensity of opposition caught Brooklawn by surprise, said David Graves, who runs the private residential center for emotionally disturbed youths on Goldsmith Lane.

Civil-rights crusader Galen Martin dies; led Ky. commission

December 20, 2006
(Editor's note: In addition to his work in Kentucky, Galen Martin founded the Tennessee Fair Housing Council, the organization that operates this web site. The staff and board of the Council extend our condolences to Galen's family on the passing of this civil rights pioneer.)
     Galen Martin, who labored for civil rights for more than four decades and helped influence civil-rights policy across the country, died yesterday at his home in Louisville. He was 79.
     He never fully recovered from a bicycle accident Aug. 23, 2003, near Bristol, Tenn., according to his son, Robert Martin, and his death was attributed to complications from the accident.
     Among his posts was serving as the first executive director of the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights, which investigated complaints of discrimination against minorities in housing and employment.
     Martin was inducted into the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame in 2000 for his leadership in drafting Kentucky's civil-rights law and his work to desegregate Jefferson County Public Schools.

Blacks still lag in home owning

October 03, 2006
Black homeownership continues to fall in Louisville, while greater shares of white and Hispanic households are buying houses and condominiums, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates released today.
     Despite local programs geared to help more African Americans buy homes, about 39 percent of the city's black households owned their homes last year -- a slight drop from 40 percent during the 2000 census, when the black homeownership rate was the lowest in three decades. Figures for both years include all of Jefferson County.

Vandals scrawl racial slurs on East End family's home

July 06, 2006
An east end family has become the target of vandalism in the form of racist slurs scrawled on their property. WAVE 3's Maureen Kyle reports.
     The Tutt family told us they woke up to "N-word" spray-painted on their front door and garage on the morning of June 26th. The vandals also tried to break the lock on their front door, and scattered roofing nails in the driveway of their English Station home.

Longtime social activist Anne Braden dead at 81

March 09, 2006
Anne Braden, a longtime social activist who was indicted on charges of sedition after helping a black couple integrate a 1950s white neighborhood in Louisville, Ky., died Monday. She was 81.
     Braden had been diagnosed with pneumonia and dehydration when she was admitted Saturday to Jewish Hospital in Louisville, said her biographer, Catherine Fosl.
     The cause of death was not announced.
     "It was a big, big life that she lived, and she was a teeny little woman who was so soft-spoken you could hardly hear her," Fosl said.
     As newspaper reporters in the 1940s and '50s, Braden and her husband, Carl, joined the struggle for social change in the South.
     The white couple found themselves in the headlines in 1954 when they agreed to buy a house and transfer the title to a black World War II veteran, Andrew Wade, and his wife, Charlotte. The Wades had tried unsuccessfully to purchase a home in the suburbs.

Group-home dispute gets heated

January 17, 2006
A dispute over a group home that Brooklawn Child & Family Services wants to open off Newburg Road has split the neighborhood and has Louisville Metro Councilman Jim King -- who lives nearby -- warning of "nuclear war."
     The heated rhetoric and intensity of opposition caught Brooklawn by surprise, said David Graves, who runs the private residential center for emotionally disturbed youths on Goldsmith Lane.

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